Black Ballots: Voting Rights in the South, 1944-1969

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Lexington Books, 1999 - 474 páginas
Black Ballots is an in-depth look at suffrage expansion in the South from World War II through the Johnson administration. Steven Lawson focuses on the "Second Reconstruction"--the struggle of blacks to gain political power in the South through the ballot-which both whites and black perceived to be a key element in the civil rights process. Examining the struggle of civil rights groups to enfranchise Negroes, Lawson also analyzes the responses of federal and local officials to those efforts. He describes the various techniques--from the white primary, the poll tax, literacy tests, and restrictive registration procedures through sheer intimidation--that were developed by white southerners to perpetuate disfranchisement and the sundry methods used by blacks and their white allies to challenge them.

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Contenido

The Strange Career of Black Disfranchisement
xix
The Rise and Fall of the White Primary
21
The Poll Tax Must Go
53
The South Fights Back Boswellianism and Bilboism
84
The Suffrage Crusade in the South The Early Phase
114
Politics and the Origins of the Civil Rights Act of 1957
138
Politics and the Passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1957
163
Justice Delayed Justice Denied
201
The Suffrage Crusade in the South The Kennedy Phase
248
We Shall Overcome
286
Free at Last?
327
Notes
351
Bibliography
427
Index
449
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Acerca del autor (1999)

Steven F. Lawson is Professor of History at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.

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