Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

mischief which had been going on during his absence, entered with Mrs. Selby and Eleanor. Meeting them near his lodgings, he had invited them in to see Fanny, and Mrs. Selby had accepted the invitation, glad of the opportunity of making some inquiry, without the cold formality which Mrs. Howard's manner had produced. They were received very distantly, but the recent indisposition formed some excuse, and they got on as well as they could. At first, Eleanor-as indeed she had generally been since her old playfellow's return-was somewhat timid and silent; but Charles, anxious to throw off the feeling of restraint which hung over them, rattled on, asking her whether she remembered this or that adventure of his boyhood, until at last they both almost forgot the present, and Mrs. Selby, finding it impossible to draw Mrs. Howard into conversation, sat listening, with a somewhat melancholy smile. In reply to some reminiscence of her childhood, Eleanor said, laughingly, “Oh, yes, dear Charlie !" the term which she had been accustomed to use in the time so vividly recalled to her memory---" Oh, yes, dear Charlie !”—and was going on, when Mrs. Howard started up suddenly, her face crimsoned with passion, and exclaimed:

“ This is too bad! Miss Selby, are you not ashamed to address a married man in such terms of familiarity before his wife ? And are not you ashamed, madam," addressing Mrs. Selby, “ to encourage your daughter in such unwarrantable freedoms ? Surely it is not too much to expect even Miss Selby to call my husband · Captain Howard' in my presence. I am his wife, and will not suffer any one to make love to him before my face.”

“ Fanny, are you mad?” exclaimed Captain Howard.

“ No, sir, neither mad nor blind; though had I been blind, perhaps I might have pleased you better. I can and do see what is going on; and even if I were blind, I could not avoid being made acquainted with it, unless deaf too. The whole town is ringing with your shameless conduct. They say that Mrs. Howard's sick room is deserted by her husband, and that all his time is spent with his mistress-Miss Eleanor Selby.”

“ Mamma!” gasped Eleanor, who was as pale as death, “ let us go home.”

“By Heaven ! Fanny,” cried Charles Howard, “ this is too bad! I have borne with your temper almost ever since the day when I was so unfortunate as to marry you ; but this I will not bear. Mrs. Selbymy dear Miss Selby, come with me. I deeply regret that through my means you have been exposed to such undeserved calumny from that insolent woman.”

We blush to write it, but as Charles approached Mrs. Howard, to take his hat, which lay on a chair near her, she snatched up a glass of water that stood on the table, and flung it in his face! His features, which had been before flushed with anger, in an instant faded to a deathlike hue ; he hesitated a moment, and then, wiping the water from his face, offered an arm each to Mrs. Selby and Eleanor, and left the room in silence.

Not a word was spoken, until they reached the quiet little cottage, in which poor Charles had passed so many happy days; but then, giving way to his feelings, he even wept before those whom he regarded as his mother and sister. Nelly's tears flowed too; only Mrs. Selby retained any appearance of composure:

“ I grieve at this, Charles,” she said; “ but I fear you must leave St.

Bennett's. Mrs. Howard must have heard some unpleasant remark, and for our sakes, you must leave ; Eleanor's name must not be made the theme of scandal.”

"And do not be angry with poor Mrs. Howard, Charles," said Eleanor ; “ she has been ill, is not well now, and then she loves you."

" Loves me!" replied Charles. " That dream was soon over-she deceived me- bitterly deceived me. But I was in fault too. Oh, how I regret my precipitancy now! Had I but seen you—I believe you are right, Mrs. Selby-I must, for your sake, leave St. Bennett's ; for your sake, I came, but it would seem as though I were doomed only to bring misery, where I would give the world to confer happiness. My mother-my darling sister, farewell! Pray for me, Nelly– I shall need your prayers."

In another moment, the garden-gate had closed, and Charles Howard was gone.

Hours had sped by before Charles could summon sufficient composure and self-command to return to his wife. Shall we attempt to trace his musings ? No-" The heart alone knoweth its own bitterness”-and, we fear, regret and sorrow on Eleanor's account mingled largely with his feelings of disgust and shame for his own wife-not unaccompanied by some thoughts—resisted but irrepressible—which caused more self-reproach than either.

“ I have but myself to blame," he thought; “ when my own little Nelly's beauty was destroyed, and by my hand too, I thought of her only as an object of pity and compassion. I have returned to find her glorious in her loveliness and her unsullied purity. She might have been taught to love me better than as a brother. Had she been maimed, and halt, and blind, she would still have been a treasure! But I must not think of that -for the sake of the unborn babe, I will be patient. I will leave St. Bennett's at once-to stay here now were torture."

When Charles reached his dwelling, he found Mrs. Howard still in the room where he had left her; and spoke to her calmly, but firmly, respecting her recent conduct. The first ebullition of passion over, she had herself felt ashamed of her behaviour ; but pride would not allow her to confess this, and she listened to her husband in silence : at length, however, she said,

“ Mrs. Carthew had been here telling me that your attentions to Miss Selby had attracted general remark, and I was vexed beyond endurance."

“ And you suffered that mischievous woman to speak in this way of one whom, as you well know, I so much respect! Fanny ! I must not say all I feel-but you must conquer your temper, or we must separate: I cannot, and will not endure such an indignity a second time from any one. Go to your room now, and send Mary Smith to me."

There was that in Charles's eyes which would not be disobeyed, as Fanny, somewhat subdued, withdrew.

The remainder of the evening was spent by Captain Howard, with Mary Smith's assistance, in packing ; and early next morning he went to take leave of Dr. Barfoot, Mr. Cooch, and some of his other friends. He paused for a moment to look at his former home-tears dimmed his sight, and he turned away.

In an hour after, Captain and Mrs. Howard were rolling along towards London.

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

PAGE 379

THE WAR IN THE EAST.
PALACE TALES: THE WHITE LADY; AND THE STORY OF PALE

SOPHIE . . . . . . . . . . . . . 400 A VOICE TO THE SAD. By G. W. THORNBURY . . . 421 EXTRACTS FROM THE COMMONPLACE-BOOK OF A LATELY DECEASED AUTHOR . . . .

. . . . . 422 AMERICAN AUTHORSHIP. BY SIR NATHANIEL. No. IX.-N. P.

WILLIS . . . . . . . . . . 425 THE Lady's Well. BY THE AUTHOR OF THE UNHOLY WISH” 430 GOSSİP FROM FLORENCE. A LETTER ADDRESSED TO THE EDITOR

OF THE “ New MONTHLY MAGAZINE" . i . . . 442 TALES OF MY DRAGOMAN. No. III. How MUFTIFIZ ROSE TO

GREATNESS. BY BASIL MAY . . . . . . 450 LITERARY LEAFLETS. BY SIR NATHANIEL. No. XIV.-MRS.

JAMESON . . . . . . . . . . . . 457 CHRONICLES OF A COUNTRY Town. Part IV. . . . 466 M‘Carthy's CALDERON . . . . . . . . 487 THE ELF-King's BRIDE. FROM THE DANISH OF HANS CHRISTIAN

ANDERSEN. BY MRS. BUSHBY . . . . . . 490 THE EPILOGUE OF 1853 . . . . . . . . 491

LONDON:
CHAPMAN AND HALL, 193, PICCADILLY.
To whom all Communications for the Editor are to be addressed.

*** REJECTED ARTICLES CANNOT BE RETURNED.

SOLD BY ALL BOOKSELLERS IN THE UNITED KINGDOM.

PRINTED BY CHARLES VIITING, BEAUFORT HOUSE, STRAND.

[graphic]

provided.

Attention re

Ye ATTENTION quested. · Of Travellers, and of the Public generally, is requested to

a few words about Coffee. Essentials of good Coffee. To obtain a Cup of good Coffee, it is requisite

1st. That the Coffee should be good.

2nd. That such good Coffee should be properly roasted. By whom

We alone provide these two essentials. Supposing, for a moment, that our prominent position in the trade, and our large Reasons. sale of Coffee, afford us no advantage in purchasing, and that it is likely that the small why Dakin's

's buyer with money, can purchase as well as the large buyer with money, still no plan Coffee is the best. of Roasting Coffee has yet been devised equally good with that invented, patented,

and used by us.

Coffee, in common with other vegetable products, contains vegetable acids, which acids act upon all base metals, and hence it is evident that when cylinders made of iron, &c., are used for the roasting of coffee, an acid and metallic product must be produced, which, being imparted to the coffee, gives it those acid and disagreeable flavours that cause the beverage to be avoided by many, and to be ultimately injurious

to more. Patent By our patent process of roasting only in cylinders made of pure metal (as silver), Roasting ap- all this injurious action is avoided, and the acid vapour, by mechanical arrangement,

paratus. frees itself from the berry as soon as generated. Greatly ap. Gentlemen of the greatest eminence in the scientific and medical world have exproved. pressed their approbation of our apparatus. It is open to all, and the public generally

are invited to inspect it.

Prices parti.

moderate.

Prices parti- The present Prices of Coffee supplied by us vary from

10d. per lb. upwards.
DAKIN and COMPY., PATENTEES

For Roasting Coffee in Silver Cylinders.
NUMBER ONE, SAINT PAUL'S CHURCHYARD, LONDON.

To remem

ber

How to save Visitors to London may save a considerable portion of their Railway expenses by money. purchasing their Teas and Coffees at NUMBER ONE, SAINT PAUL'S CHURCH.

YARD, which is in the very centre of England's Metropolis, and a position more easily identified than any in London.

NEW MONTHLY MAGAZINE.

THE WAR IN THE EAST. It is impossible not to allow that the policy of Great Britain in the present crisis in the East, so far as it has yet gone, has been simple and straightforward. It has been directed by all possible efforts to obtain a peaceful arrangement of the differences that have arisen between the Sultan and his powerful neighbour, to oppose the aggrandisement of Russia, and to preserve the integrity of Turkey. Failing in peaceful measures to ensure these objects, England is prepared to go to war with the greatest military power in the world in concert with her chivalrous and warlike ally-France. This, however, not till every possible means of bringing about an adjustment shall have been exhausted; even to trauquilly permitting the occupation of the Danubian Provinces, or allowing the Russians and Turks to fight out the battle themselves, until some great catastrophe happening to the latter, or a triumphant march upon the Sultan's capital, shall actually force the allies to more energetic steps.

The reason of this policy is as simple as the policy itself; it is adopted because, were the Crimea occupied by British or French troops, Sebastapol taken by land, the Black Sea fleet destroyed, Odessa blockaded, and Russia placed in the last straits, should, indeed, probably any reverse occur to the Russian arms, Austria would come forward to the help of one to whom she is largely indebted for her own integrity. Russia crippled would be the signal for an uprise in Poland, which will involve the interference of Prussia, otherwise friendly disposed towards us and the cause of Turkey, in favour of Russia. Thus England and France would soon find themselves at hand with three of the most powerful states in Europe, the whole Germanic Confederation would be brought into the trouble, and a battle originally begun on the Bosphorus might be concluded on the Rhine. Any necessity imposed upon Austria to interfere in favour of Russia would involve insurrection in Hungary, to whom any disasters happening to either power are so many opportunities. Indeed, it would be difficult to say if the Hungarians are not prepared to rise at the first turn of fortune that should happen to Russian arms, for the results of the last war satisfied them that they could cope with the Austrians single-handed. Again, Austria engaged in subjugating Hungary in insurrection, the Lombards would seize the opportunity to assert their nationality. Thus Russia, Austria, and Prussia, would have, in case of a general war, enough on their hands without the threatening aspect of things in the East. It would also be difficult, in the actual state of things in Russia itself, to determine that the commerce and wellbeing of the vast populations which compose that empire, could be Dec.-VOL. XCIX. NO. CCCXCVI.

2 c

« AnteriorContinuar »