The Annals and Magazine of Natural History, Volumen1

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Taylor & Francis., 1838
 

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Página 115 - In a small apartment they are audible at the distance of twelve feet. "The sounds obviously proceed from the mouth of the animal ; and, at the instant of the stroke, we observe the lips suddenly separate, as if to allow the water to rush into a small vacuum formed within. As these animals are hermaphrodites, requiring mutual impregnation, the sounds may possibly be a means of communication between them ; or, if they be of an electric nature, they may be the means of defending from foreign enemies...
Página 4 - In this year the red appearance continued from the month of November till May, and its unusual exuberance was supposed to originate from the great mildness of the winter, and the consequent smaller elevation of the water of the lake being favourable to the development of the matter, which was evidently organic, and caused the redness. During the early hours of the day the lake presented nothing remarkable, but soon after there appeared long, red, very regular and parallel lines along its borders...
Página 229 - From a close inspection of the locality, Mr. Lees is inclined to think that the tree alluded to is not there indigenous, although probably entitled to an antiquity of not less than 400 years. The vestiges of a habitation and garden, he thought, might be traced in some bricks and remains near the spot, and in the presence of solitary specimens of Liguslrum vulgare and Prunus domeslica, the only ones which he observed in the whole forest.
Página 147 - MOLLUSCOUS ANIMALS, including SHELL-FISH; containing an Exposition of their Structure, Systematical Arrangement, Physical Distribution, and Dietetical Uses, with a reference to the Extinct Races.
Página 407 - Oriental nations, where amaenitas, and not utilitas alone, must have been the object in the cultivation of flowers. He next alluded to the gardens mentioned in the Latin classics, and contended that the garden of Lucullus, so often referred to, ought not to be regarded as a specimen either of the art or the taste of his time, as it was censured by his own contemporaries Cicero and Varro, the latter expressly stating " Hortos Luculli non floribus fructibusque sed tabvlis fuisse insignes.
Página 171 - Two of the finest of the climbers are the beautiful large-flowered Solandra grandiflora, which, diffusing itself among the branches of the largest trees of the forest, gives them a magnificence not their own ; and...
Página 230 - The tree, when visited in 1836, was much dilapidated, and presented the appearance of extreme old age in the battered state of its bole, great height, broken lower branches, and tenuity and tortuosity of the upper ones, which only bear flowers from the young shoots at their very ends. Fruit is produced annually, and is eagerly gathered as a curiosity by the country people, who look upon it as a charm, suspending it in their habitations, and appearing to consider it a safeguard, while to the mountain...
Página 266 - These hollows are inhabited by a light brownish ant, about two or three tenths of an inch long, which inflicts the most painful bites. Its antenna? are placed near the middle of the anterior portion of the head ; mandibles triangular ; peduncle of the abdomen with two rings ; the anus hairy and provided with a sting or piercer (Myrmica, Latr., nova species). They fall upon their prey with the greatest virulence, and insert their mandibles almost instantly, as soon as they come in contact with any...
Página 462 - ... does not injure from exposure to the damp ; and twenty years experience has proved that in that time it will not rot, though in a wet soil under the ground. For ship-building it is a most valuable wood; as the injury which it has received from being perforated in various places by a large...
Página 214 - ... Totara, only longer and narrower. It bears a red berry ; of which the natives are particularly fond, and which has latterly become an article of barter among themselves. The first visitors to New Zealand were much disappointed in this tree. It is, what has commonly been called, the white pine ; but it is of so soft and spongy a nature, as to rot in a few months, if exposed to the weather. It absorbs so much wet, that, in the damp climate of New Zealand it is almost impossible to season it; and...

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