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were, by the different spokes of a wheel extending from the hub toward the rim, and this whether you move directly by the chord or on the inside arc, hugging the Blue Ridge more closely. The chord-line, as you see, carries you by Aldie, Haymarket, and Fredericksburg; and you see how turnpikes, railroads, and finally the Potomac, by Aquia Creek, meet you at all points from Washington; the same, only the lines lengthened a little, if you press closer to the Blue Ridge part of the way.

The gaps through the Blue Ridge I understand to be about the following distances from Harper's Ferry, to wit: Vestal's, 5 miles ; Gregory's, 13; Snicker's, 18; Ashby's, 28; Manassas, 38 ; Chester, 45; and Thornton's, 53

should think it preferable to take the route nearest the enemy, dis

I

The gaps

abling him to make an important move without your knowledge, and compelling him to keep his forces together for dread of you. would enable you to attack if you should wish.

For a great part of the way you would be practically between the enemy and both Washington and Richmond, enabling us to spare you the greatest riumber of troops from here.

When at length running for Richmond ahead of him enables him to move this way, if he does so, turn and attack him in rear. But I think he should be engaged long before such point is reached. It is all

easy

if troops march as well as the enemy, and it is unmanly to say they cannot do it. This letter is in no sense an order.

Yours truly,

A. LINCOLN.

our

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL

MCCLELLAN

October 24 (25?], 1862.

Will you par

I HAVE just read your despatch about sore-tongued and fatigued horses. don me for asking what the horses of your army have done since the battle of Antietam that fatigues anything ?

A. LINCOLN.

EMANCIPATION PROCLAMA

TION

January 1, 1863.

WHEREAS, on the twenty-second day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two, a proclamation was issued by the President of the United States, containing, among other things, the following, to

wit:

“That on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves within any State, or designated part of a

State, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free; and the Executive Government of the United States, including the military and naval authority thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of such persons, and will do no act or acts to repress such persons, or any of them, in any efforts they may make for their actual freedom.

“That the Executive will, on the first day of January aforesaid, by proclamation, designate the States and parts of States, if any, in which the people thereof respectively shall then be in rebellion against the United States; and the fact that any State, or the people thereof, shall on that day be in good faith represented in the Congress of the United States

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