Purity of Diction in English Verse

Portada
Chatto & Windus, 1952 - 211 páginas
The author defines and exemplifies the principles of purity in dictation, with reference for teh most part to poetry of the late eighteenth century, and then applies these principles to some later poetry.

Dentro del libro

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Contenido

The Diction of English Verse
5
The Chastity of Poetic Diction
18
The Language of the Tribe
29
Derechos de autor

Otras 12 secciones no mostradas

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Acerca del autor (1952)

Donald Davie was at the forefront of the poetic school of the 1950s known as the Movement. The group's aesthetic was characterized by simplicity, in contrast to the extravagant rhetoric and stylistic excesses that they felt marked neoromantic poetic trends. Unlike other Movement poets, though, Davie generally eschews a casual tenor or informal voice, resorting instead to a more traditional prosody and affirming the influence of late Augustan poets. Davie's most durable contribution to poetic debates of the period was a work of literary criticism called Purity of Diction in English Verse (1952). The laws of poetic syntax, he argues, are as momentous as the laws of human society and should be appreciated equally. Davie was born in Barnsley, a place that figures gloomily in much of his work. He has taught at universities in both Great Britain and the United States.

Información bibliográfica