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WANTED.—By a young Lady, aged nineteen, of pleasing Few can doubt the eligibility of this candidate countenance, good figure, agreeable manners, general in, for the marriage noose. But he is in a bad fix, formation and varied accomplishments, who has studied every thing, from the creation to crochet, a situation in and honestly says that he wants a wife to take the family of a gentleman. She will take the head of the care of him. And, really, his brilliant and subtable, manage his household, scold his servants, nurse his stantial accomplishments should recommend babies (when they arrive), check his tradesmen's bills, ac- him to some of the new families of Murray company him to the theatre, cut tho leaves of his new book, sew on his buttons, warm his slippers, and generally Hill, who would find such a son-in-law a rare make his life happy. Apply in the first place, by letter, acquisition. to Louisa Caroline, Linden Grove, ---, and afterward to The next, quoted from the New York Herald, Papa, upon the premises. Wedding-Ring, No. 4, Small.

is modest with all the virtue of innocence: The following, of the same gender, is equally

WANTED. —A situation as son-in-law in a respectable as explicit :

family. Blood and breeding no object, being already supA HIGHLY RESPECTABLE WIDOW, A LITTLE OVER THIR- plied; capital essential. No objection to going a short disTY, unincumbered, and possessing her own pin-money, is tance into the country. of a kind and affectionate disposition, and capable of making a home happy, would like to correspond with a widow

Another young man is hunting after a hander older than herself (has no objection to a family), with a some income: view to matrimouy. Can give good references and reasons for this mode of making her wishes known. Will re

MATRIMONIAL.-WANTED.--A Wife, possessing intelliceive letters for one week. Address, etc., etc.

gence and a moderate allowance of beauty, by a young

man of twenty-five, passably good-looking, and enjoying a The “highly respectable widow," for the handsome income. Any young lady of property, inatribenefit of the coming husband, is “unincum- monially inclined, may find a corre-pondent of like in.

Williamsburg Poebered," but graciously says in advance that she clination by addressing Harry

office, New York. “has no objection to a family." She is, however, particular that the future husband should The gem of matrimonial advertising, howbe “ a widower older than herself,” fancying, ever, is the following. The writer is evidently perhaps, that “old birds are caught with chaff," a coward; but still, under certain circumstances, or rather, maybe, that widowers of experience displays a remarkable degrec of cominon sense: make the most pliant husbands, if perchance A YOUNG GENTLEMAN, on the point of getting married, they have gone through a hard mill. Never- is desirous of meeting a man of experience who will distheless, those disposed to reply to such an ad-suade him from guch a step. Address, etc. vertisement should remember Sam Weller's Experience “after marriage" produces also immortal advice, " Beware of the vidders !" some curious features in the advertising col

Here is another, which is really tantalizing: umns. For example, a man out West thus MATRIMONIAL.-A young Lady, aged eighteen, of good

posts his truant wife: appearance, now visiting in the country, wishes to corre. On the 6th of July, on the night of Monday, eloped from spond with a gentleman between the ages of twenty and her husband, the wife of Jolin Grundy. His grief for her thirty with a view to matrimony. Money no object, as absence ench day growing deeper, should any man find the advertiser possesmes ample means to support them her he begs him to keep her. handsomely through life. Please address Miss S

Another husband is disconsolate, and calls Street, New York.

upon an absent wife to return to his "bed and Sweet "cighteen, money no object," "am- board;" and in any event of non-compliance, to ple means to support them handsomely through send the next best thing--the key of the cuplife.” Great inducements! and, doubtless, a board : great humbng. But still, it may be that Miss

JANE-Your absence will ruin all. Think of your bus. S-- is “honest." Nevertheless, we can not band—your parents—your children. Return-return- all help questioning the “good appearance" of the may be well--happy. At any rate, inclose the key of the advertiser.

cupboard where the gin is. Very young men are also guilty of advertis- In the columns of the Albany Times we find ing for matrimonial companions. A promising the following advertisement, which we copy ver. young gentleman thus advertised in the New batim, free from charge: York Dispatch:

$3 REWARD.-The above reward will be paid to whoI AM TWENTY-THREE YEARS OF AGE, five feet eleven ever will cause the return to me of my wife Mary. She is inches and a half in height, a figure and face said to be of middle size, light complexioned, freckles on face, short the model of symmetry and beauty-a gentleman by birth hair, trimmed behind, and wears beau-catchers, and inheritance (there was never a mechanic in my family), 15 years of age, and of a loving disposition, and had on educated in a European University, an accomplished mu- three rattan hoops. WM. Snow, Corner of Lodge and sician, a thorough linguist—and utterly incapable of earn. Maiden. ing a living. I should like to marry into a wealthy fami.

A repentant husband, of Conway, N. H., thus ly, which, wanting the prestige of birth, would be elevated by an alliance with me. I could minko myself generally exposes his weakness to the gaze of the public: useful in such a family by teaching the younger members

WHEREAS I, DANIEL CLAY, through misrepresentation, manners, and accustoming the elder to the easy carriage way induced to post my wife Rhoda in the papers, now brg and grace of well-bred people. There are many wealthy leave to inform the public that I have taken her to wife, families who have boxes at the opera, who, under my di- after settling all our domestic broils in an amicable manrection, would speedily learn to look as aristocratic and ner; so that every thing, as usual, goes on like clock-work. important as they try to persuade themselves that they

On the other hand, although not so commonSuch a family, after a few lessons from me, would pass for well-bred people—in a crowd--and I should make ly, we have women advertising for truant hasthem understand the opera, which now they do not. bands. In these, however, there is but little vi

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riety. Yet now and then the reader may meet confess that our ingenuity is entirely at fault with one of an emphatic character, as, for in- here, and that we can not venture upon even a stance, when a woman thus closes her advertise- probable solution of this advertising riddle. ment: “Daniel may be known by a scar on his We therefore leave it among the unsolved mysnose-where I scratched him."

teries. Here is a whole romance contained in four lit- That the Irish are in America we find luditle lines. What pictures of life in a great city crous evidence even among advertisements. they open up to the mind's eye! They lead the The following appeared during last year in one mind to imagine a wcak, and it may be an err- of the New York dailies : ing woman, contending against evils and out

NOTICE.-If the gentleman who keeps a store in Cedar rages that menaced her very existence, helped Street with a red head, will return the umbrella he borout of trouble by some Good Samaritan, and re- rowed from a lady with an ivory handle, he will hear of

solving to obey that injunction that may have something to his advantage. • been long sounding in her car, “Go, and sin Another, in the same paper, setting forth the no more :"

many conveniences and advantages to be deMr. C., of 132 B. W.-Spring Street was a good place rived from metal window-sashes, among other for me on the 18th--evening. You have saved my life particulars enumerates as follows: “ Those and little money. God bless you and help you out of your sashes will last forever; and afterward, if the trouble. I left town forever.

MARIE B.

owner has no use for them, they might be sold Every day we find just such bits of romance for old iron.” lurking among the “ Personals.”

Listen to The above can only be matched by an anthis wail of affection from a faithful woman's nouncement contained in transatlantic newsheart:

paper: ALONZO.-Received. I implore you to guffer me to come Missing from Killarney, JANE O'FOGARTY, she had in

Your society (even in poverty) I should prefer to her arms two babies and a Guernsey cow, all black, with all the world besides. Pray give me hope of seeing you red hair and tortoise-shell combe behind her ears, and I am truly miserable. Write to same address.

large spots all down her back, which squints awfully. ELIZA A.

Here is another which is “confusion worso As an offset, we often find fugitive friends or relatives implored to return to their deserted confounded,” but is certainly a bona fide adver

tisement : homes. Here are two such, addressed to the same person on different days:

Tuus is to certify that I, DANIEL O'FLANAGAN, am not

the person who was tarred and feathered by the liberty M. I. S.-Dolly, we are very anxious about you. Write, mob on Tuesday last; and I am ready to give twenty or return home. All will be forgiven. W. R. S. guineas to any one that will bet mo fifty that I am the

M. I. S.-Dolly, why don't you come home? Have you other man who goes by my name. not any sympathy for me? If you could appreciate my

Witness my hand, this 30th of July, 1865. love for you, you would never desert your home and

DAN. O'FLANAGAN. friends. We are only mortal, and liable to err. will return, your word shall be law. Take pity on me, do,

Among “Personals” in the London Times, a for Heaven's sake!

W. R. S. few years ago, the following challenge appeared The following is evidently from a coxcomb from one of the “softer sex:" who has been carrying on a correspondence with I, ELIZABETH WILKINSON, of Clerkenwell, having had some romantic unknown:

some words with Hannah Hyfield, and requiring satisfac.

tion, do invite her to meet me on the stage, and box mo TRUTUFCL's lettere all received. She is earnestly re

for three guineas, ench woman holding half-l-crown in quested to throw aside the impenetrable veil of secre- each hand, and the first woman that drops the money to cy which now envelop3 her, and grant an interview. lose the battle. She shall have rare sport. Charles has loved sincerely, earnestly, devotedly; but believed his fragrance was wasted on the desert air. Should

This evoked an answer on the next day, the object of his affections prove to be the fair unknown, couched in the following language: happiness may yet be in store for both. When they meet Charles will describe his palace by the lake of Como,

1, HANNAU IIYFIELD, of Newgate Market, hearing of which, with himself, his ten thousand a year, his shooting the resoluteness of Elizabeth Wilkinson, will not fail, God box on the Mississippi, and all his other jewels, shall be willing, to give her more blows than words. Desiring hers.

home-blows, and from her no favor, she may expect a

good thumping. To close these “personals” of a special character, see what loose ideas of American etiquette

The London Times, by-the-way, is not very far and English grammar break out in the following behind he New York press in the singularity of announcement:

many of its advertisements. As an example of

the peculiar things found in its columns, take If the young lady who bowed to a gentleman in a rin. dow on Broadway, near Broome Street, who had on a blue the announcement of the wants of a pious and dress and black silk mantilla, will address a note to 0. II., affluent elderly lady, who, desirous of having Broadway Post Office, and state how an introduction cau the services of a domestic like-minded with herbe obtained, she will confer a great fnvor.

self, appeals to the public for “a groom to tako What on earth could a gentleman in a blue charge of two carriage-horses of a serious turn dress and black silk mantilla have been doing in of mind.” So, also, the simple-hearted inna window on Broadway ? and why should a keeper, who advertises his “limited charges and young lady who had never been introduced bow civility ;” and the description given by a disto him, unless she took him for a lay figure in- tracted family of a runaway member, who contended to represent a Chinese mandarin? We sider that they are affording valuable means for

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his identification, by saying, “Age not precisely vertising on an extensive scale that they can known, but looks older than he is.”

now meet with any degree of success by now Only a few weeks ago, the “Thunderer,” un- and then catching a flat. But people in search der its “Wants" advertised for “a nurse in a' of employment, and others disposed (for the small gentleman's family.” The size of the gen- purpose of inquiry or speculation) to the purtleman might, probably, be esteemed a matter chase of undesignated trinkets for ornamentaworthy of mention, as female servants nowa- tion, or articles “useful to every housekeeper," days, even in Old England, are growing dainty. have a right to complain of the many deceptive The nuisance in this country, so long endured advertisements contained in the daily and weekwithout complaint, has at length grown to such ly press by which the public are not only gulled proportions that the press, with its ten thousand but cheated. For instance, seventy-five cents is tongues, has condescended to come to the aid sent by some person to a firm in which of the persecuted housekeeper. And even the advertises “Lincoln Watches," and receives in advertising column is sometimes used to contain return a small quantity of very poor ointment, a piece of wholesome satire hitting at the do- “warranted to cure certain cutaneous diseases mestic evil. The New Huren Palladium lately as surely as a watch keeps time," packed in a published the following:

piece of tin soldered together in the shape of a WANTED TO Blire.—A lady, having a pleasant home, watch; another sends one dollar to — no incumbrances but a busband and one child, wishes to “Patent time-keeper, warranted never to get place herself at the disposal of some servant who can come out of order," and receives in return a common well recommended from her last place. She would prefer card, on which is printed a wood-cut representone who would be willing to remain within doors at least five minutes ufter the work is finished. She would also ing the face of a sun-dial, which, with an acstipulate for the privilege of going to church herself once companying shawl-pin, is worth nearly one cent. each Sunday, having been compelled to refuse the last ap- These are but two out of two thousand instances plicant, who was not willing to allow her but half a day of dishonest advertising flooding the press weekonce a fortnight. Wages satisfactory, is under $10 : week.

She is deeply conscious of the utter inability of Indies ly, and are of a class which is bringing adverin general to comply with the present demands of servants, tising into disrepute, and daily proving the nebut she hopes by strict attention to please in all respects

. cessity of some kind of censorship to insure the The best of references can be given; also, a good recom- public against misrepresentation and fraud. mend from one who has now left her to the fute of many housekcepers. Please apply before 6 A.M.

()ccasionally, however, we may find in an ad

vertisement honesty intensified. Here, for inWhile on the subject of servants, among the stance, is one from the Pall Mall (London) Gamany curiosities with which the advertising col- zelle: umns of the London Times are daily studded, we do not remember to have ever met with so

Dog.-Required a kind master for an excellent black

retriever dog. Owner parts with him on no other account splendid an effort as the following, which ap- than his savage tendencies. Addrces P. A. P., Post-office, peared recently: DO YOU WANT A SERVANT ? — Necessity prompts the

The second is from the same paper: question. The advertiser offers his services to any lady

A COUNTRY CLERGYMAN would feel most thankful to or gentleman, company, or others, in want of a truly faithful, confidential servant in any capacity not meniai, any benevolent lady that would kindly take into her serr. where a practical knowledge of human nature in various

ice a strong motherless girl of sixteen, whom he is anxious parts of the world would be available. Could undertake

to get from home, but whom he can not r.commend for any affair of small or great importance, where talent, in honesty and truthfulness. Address, etc., etc. violable recrecy, or good address would be necessary. Ilas moved in the best and worst societies without being shoes and fancy articles, in an Eastern paper,

Coming near home, an advertisement of cheap contaminated by either; has never been a servant, but begs to recommend himself as one who knows his place; says: “N.B. Ladies who wish cheap shoes will is moral, temperate, middle-aged. No objection to any do well to call soon, as they will not last long." part of the world. Could advise any capitalist wishing We give the advertiser thc benefit of the double to increase his income and have the control of his own money. Could act as accretary or valet to any lady or

entendre. gentleman. Can give advice or hold his tongue, eing, The following was lately contained in a Westdance, play, fence, box, preach a sermon, tell a story, be crn paper : grave or gay, viiiculous or sublime, or do any thing, from the curling of a peruke to the storming of a citadel, but friends and others to let me have liquor, which is hurtful

WIIEREAS, at particular time, I may importune my never to excel his master.

to me and detrimental to society: This is, therefore, to The public, it is feared, have too much rea

forbid any persons selling me liquor, or letting me son to complain that it is too frequently the itikan any account or pretende: for if they do I will pas

itively prosecute them, notwithstanding any promise I case that advertisements give an uncertain may make to the contrary at the time they may let me sound. Newspaper columns are open to the have it.

Joux lIOLES. honest and the dishonest alike, so that even the It is evident that John wrote the above when high-toned, moral, or religious character of the he was sober and repentant, and meant to be journal publishing a certain advertisement af- honest and faithful to himself and to others. fords no guarantee to the public that respond- For being similarly addicted to the foible al. ents may not be swindled. In this connection luded to, “Polly Lines” advertises her better. it is not necessary to refer to lotteries, gift en half: terprises, etc. Such concerns are being gener- NOTICE. - Whereas Benjamin F. Lines has become so ally correctly estimated, and it is only by ad- I addicted to the use of the critter" as to render himself

Clinton,

have soon.

riety. Yet now and then the reader may meet confess that our ingenuity is entirely at fault with one of an emphatic character, as, for in- here, and that we can not venture upon even a stance, when a woman thus closes her advertise- probable solution of this advertising riddle. ment: “Daniel may be known by a scar on his We therefore leave it among the unsolved mysnose—where I scratched him."

terics. Here is a whole romance contained in four lit- That the Irish are in America we find luditle lines. What pictures of life in a great city crous evidence even among advertisements. they open up to the mind's eye! They lead the The following appeared during last year in one mind to imagine a weak, and it may be an err- of the New York dailies : ing woman, contending against evils and out

NOTICE.-If the gentleman who keeps a store in Cedar rages that menaced her very existence, helped Street with a red head, will return the umbrella he borout of trouble by some Good Samaritan, and re- rowed from a lady with an ivory handle, he will hear of solving to obey that injunction that may have something to his advantage. been long sounding in her ear, “Go, and sin Another, in the same paper, setting forth the no more:”

many conveniences and advantages to be deMr. C., of 132 B. W.-Spring Street was n good place rived from metal window-sashes, among other for me on the 18th—evening. You have saved my life particulars enumerates as follows:

" Those and little money. God bless you and help you out of your sashes will last forever; and afterward, if the trouble. I left town forever.

MARIE B.

owner has no use for them, they might be sold Every day we find just such bits of romance for old iron." lurking among the “ Personals.”

Listen to The above can only be matched by an anthis wail of affection from a faithful woman's nouncement contained in a transatlantic newsheart:

paper: Alonzo.--Received. I implore you to guffer me to come MISSING from Killarney, JANE OʻFOGARTY, she had in to you. Your society (even in poverty) I should prefer to her arms two babies and a Guernsey cow, all black, with all the world besides. Pray give me hope of seeing you red hair and tortoise-shell combe behind her cars, and I am truly miserable. Write to same address.

large spots all down her back, which squints awfully. ELIZA A.

Here is another which is confusion worso As an offset, we often find fugitive friends or relatives implored to return to their deserted confounded,” but is certainly a bona fide adver

tisement: homes. Here are two such, addressed to the same person on different days:

This is to certify that I, DANIEL O'FLANAGAN, am not

the person who was tarred and feathered by the liberty M. I. S.-Dolly, we are very anxious about you. Write, mob on Tuesday last; and I am ready to give twenty or return home. All will be forgiven. W. R. S.

guineas to any one that will bet me fifty that I am the M. I. S.-Dolly, why don't you come home? Have you other man who goes by my name. Dot any synıpathy for me? If you could appreciate my

Witness my hand, this 30th of July, 1865. love for you, you would never desert yoаr home and

DAN. O'FLANAGAN. friends. We are only mortal, and liable to err. will return, your word shall bo law. Take pity on me, do,

Among “Personals” in the London Times, a for Heaven's sake!

W. R. S. few years ago, the following challenge appeared The following is evidently from a coxcomb from one of the “ softer sex:" who has been carrying on a correspondence with I, ELIZABETH WILKINSON, of Clerkenwell, having had some romantic unknown :

some words with Hannah Hyfield, and requiring satisfac.

tion, do invite her to meet me on the stage, and box mo TBUTIFUL'S letters all received. She is enrnestly re- for three guineas, ench woman holding half--crown in quested to throw aside the impenetrable veil of secre- each hand, and the first woman that drops the money to cy which now envelops her, and grant an interview. lose the battle. She shall liave rare sport. Charles has loved sincerely, earnestly, devotedly; but believed his fragrance was wasted on the desert air. Should

This evoked an answer on the next day, the object of his affections prove to be the fair unknown, couched in the following language: happiness may yet be in store for both. When they meet Charles will describe his palace by the lake of Como,

1, HANNAU HYFIELD, of Newgate Market, hearing of which, with himself, his ten thousand a year, his shooting the resoluteness of Elizabeth Wilkinson, will not fail, God box on the Mississippi, and all his other jewels, shall be willing, to give her more blows than words. Desiring hery.

home-blows, and from her no favor, she may expect a

good thumping. To close these “personals” of a special character, sce what loose ideas of American etiquette

The London Times, by-the-way, is not very far and English grammar break out in the following behind the New York press in the singularity of announcement:

many of its advertisements. As an example of If the young lady who bowed to a gentleman in a win. the peculiar things found in its columns, take dow on Broadway, near Broome Street, who had on a blue the announcement of the wants of a pious and dreze and black silk mantilla, will address a note to 0. 11., affluent elderly lady, who, desirons of having Broadway Post Office, and state how an introductiou can the services of a domestic like-minded with herbe obtained, she will confer a great favor.

self, appeals to the public for “a groom to tako What on earth could a gentleman in a blue charge of two carriage-horses of a serious turn dress and black silk mantilla have been doing in of mind.” So, also, the simple-hearted inna window on Broadway? and why should a keeper, who advertises his limited charges and young lady who had never been introduced bow civility ;” and the description given by a disto him, unless she took him for a lay figure in- tracted family of a runaway member, who con. tended to represent a Chinese mandarin? We sider that they are affording valuable means for

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to emanate from a confirmed and crusty bach- day the pronunciation of the now popular inelor:

quiry is that of the original hand-bill. BOALD AND REPOSE WANTED. - In some sensible fr- The examples given will show that the art of mily, uninfested with cats, poodle dogs, canary-birds, ju- advertising, if not one of the fine arts is certainvenile jewsharpe, mimicking old maids, scheining wid- ly one of the most useful. In fact, it has beowe, feminine "hopefuls' with match-making mammas, or other nuisances. Ilot dinuer required on Sunday. Terms come almost necessary both to buyer and seller. not to exceed $50 per month. Address, Comfort-Seeker, There are those, however, who have endeavored - Madison Square, N. Y.

to make it in reality a fine art. Packwood, some The Boston Traveler lately contained, in the fifty years ago, led the way in England of liberal form of an advertisement, a fair hint at the un

and systematic advertising, by impressing his scemly, inconvenient, and ridiculous custom of razor-strop indelibly on the mind of every beardyoung men and hobbledehoys who every Sun-ed member of the kingdom. Like other great day annoy the public by impudently obstructing potentates, he boasted a laureate in his pay, and the passages in front of the churches an evil every one remembers the reply made to the inwhich unfortunately exists in many other vil- dividuals so curious to know who drew up his lages besides Boston, Massachusetts :

advertisements: “La! Sir! we keeps a poet."

But by universal consent, the world has acA Card.— The Donkey Club of this city would respect- corded to the late George Robins the palm in fully inform the public that they have made arrangements the fine style of commercial puffing. His ad. for an extensive demonstration, on the sidewalk opposite Winter Street Church, at the close of divine service on vertisements were really artistically written. Sunday, the 4th instant. Mocstacur, Corresponding Like Martin, he had the power of investing Secretary and Chairman of the Street Lounging Com- every landscape and building that he touched mittee.

with an importance and majesty not attainable Advertising stratagems are sufficiently nu- by meaner hands. He did, perhaps, go beyond merous to merit almost a sheet of examples. the yielding line of even poetical license, when One of the most curious, “whereby hangs a he described one portion of a paradise he was tale," belongs to England, and deserves a place about to subject to public competition as adorned, in Harper's Monthly, the receptacle of all things among other charms, with "a hanging wood," literary worth preserving. The story is that, which the astonished purchaser found out meant some few years ago, a hatter in London specu- nothing more nor less than an old gallows. But lated purchase of the entire stock of a then he redeemed slight manæuvres of this kind bankrupt brother tradesman; but, soon after his by touches which displayed a native and overpurchase, he found that he had overstocked him- flowing genius for puffing. On one occasion he · self. He was on the point of reluctantly dis- had made the beauties of an estate so enchantmissing some of his “hands” when a sharp- ing that he found it necessary to blur his dewitted friend came to the rescuc. By his ad- scription by a fault or two, lest it should prore vice a hand-bill, announcing the cheapness of too bright and good " for human nature's daily the hatter's wares, was prepared and distributed food." “But there are two drawbacks to this exactly as had been already done for some time, property," sighed out this apostle of the mart, except in one particular item. The bill was the litter of the rose leaves and the noise of the headed, “Who's your Atter ?” and throughout nightingales." Certainly the rhetoric of csquiits contents the goods were invariably mentioned site puffing could no further go. as “ats:" "Youth's Silk Ats"-"Best Beaver We can not refrain from giving a part of one Ats”—“Ladies Riding Ats”—and so forth. The of his advertisements, which were always of conremainder of the advertisement was in unex- siderable length, sometimes occupying an enceptionable English. The result perfectly jus- tire column of the Times. The following es. tified the inventor's anticipations. These bills tract refers to the sale of Fort Abbey in Dorset. were sought after as typographical curiosities. shire. After the usual introduction, Mr. Robins Men shouted with laughter at the ludicrous ef- went on to say: fect of what many considered ignorance on the

And in the description that necessarily must follow, Mr. part of the printer or of the writer. They car- Robins, without the slightest affectation, proclaims that ried these bills in their pockets and merrily he approaches the task with fear and trembling. The showed them to their friends. One or two only eaving clause by which he can well seek to soften the elderly gentlemen, prev usly perf strangers,

reproaches of an enlightened nnd deeply-read community

is alone to be found in the liberty the composer will tako came to the shop, bought “ats," and expostu- with authors so highly-gifted, that he must indeed be a lated gravely with the “atter" upon the sole- bold man who will not yield assent to his researches. Dngcism. Young fellows purchased gossamers for dale is no mean anthority, and with this and a few introthe fun of the thing, begged for hand-bills, and ductory facts, the herculenn task must be approached. held jocular conversations with the shopkeeper. distant dny, and it has ever since maintained it: proud

The Fort Abbey Demesnes are to be traced back to a very The shop became known, and the proprietor superiority over every other monastery in England. It is frequently smiles as he hears the street-boys call- a splendidly grand and unique building, altogether realizing out the established phrase of "Who's your ing Lord Byron's glowing description of Norman Abbey: Atter?” the origin of which, but for the publi- “An old, old monastery once, and now

Still older mansion, of a rich and rare cation of this curious little episode in advertising, might, possibly in a few short years, have

Few specimens yet left us can compare." been lost forever to the antiquarian. To this Its classic front extends to near 800 feet. The order of

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