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ACT OF 1913

ACT OF 1922

foreign country whenever he shall find as a fact that such country

Imposes, directly or indirectly, upon the disposition in or transportation in transit through or reexportation from such country of any article wholly or in part the growth or product of the United States any unreasonable charge, exaction, regulation, or limitation which is not equally enforced upon the like articles of every foreign country;

Discriminates in fact against the commerce of the United Srates, directly or indirectly, by law or administrative regulation or practice, by or in respect to any customs, tonnage, or port duty, fee, charge, exaction, classification, regulation, condition, restriction, or prohibition, in such manner as to place the commerce of the United States at a disadvantage compared with the commerce of any foreign country.

ACT OF 1930 (b) EXCLUSION FROM IMPORTATION.-If at any time the President shall find it to be a fact that any foreign country has not only discriminated against the commerce of the United States, as aforesaid, but has, after the issuance of a proclamation as authorized in subdivision (a) of this section, maintained or increased its said discriminations against the commerce of the United States, the President is hereby authorized, if he deems it consistent with the interests of the United States, to issue a further proclamation directing that such products of said country or such articles imported in its vessels as he shall deem consistent with the public interests shall be excluded from importation into the United States. [No corresponding provision in act of 1913.]

(b) If at any time the President shall find it to be a fact that any foreign country has not only discriminated against the commerce of the United States, as aforesaid, but has, after the issuance of a proclamation as authorized in subdivision (a) of this section, maintained or increased its said discriminations against the commerce of the United States, the President is hereby authorized, if he deems it consistent with the interests of the United States, to issue a further proclamation directing that such articles of said country as he shall deem the public interests may require shall be excluded from im

portation into the United States. (c) APPLICATION OF PROCLAMATION.-Any proclamation issued by the President under the authority of this section shall, if he deems it consistent with the interests of the United States, extend to the whole of any foreign country or may be confined to any subdivision or subdivisions thereof; and the President shall, whenever he deems the public interests require, suspend, revoke, supplement, or amend any such proclamation. [No corresponding provision in act of 1913.)

(c) That any proclamation issued by the President under the authority of this section shall, if he deems it consistent with the interests of the United States, extend to the whole of any foreign country or may be confined to any subdivision or subdivisions thereof; and the President shall, whenever he deems the public interests require, suspend, revoke,

supplement, or amend any such proclamation. (d) DUTIES TO OFFSET COMMERCIAL DISADVANTAGES.-Whenever the President shall find as a fact that any foreign country places any burden or disadvantage upon the commerce of the United States by any of the unequal impositions or discriminations aforesaid, he shall, when he finds that the public interest will be served thereby, by proclamation specify and declare such new or additional rate or rates of duty as he shall determine will offset such burden or disadvantage, not to exceed 50 per centum ad valorem or its equivalent, on any products of, or on articles imported in a vessel os, such foreign country; and thirty days after the date of such proclamation there shall be levied, collected, and paid upon the articles enumerated in such proclamation when imported into the United States from such foreign country such new or additional rate or rates of duty; or, in case of articles declared subject to exclusion from importation into the United States under the provisions of subdivision (b) of this section, such articles shall be excluded from importation. (No corresponding provision in act of 1913.)

(d) Whenever the President shall find as a fact that any foreign country places any burdens upon the commerce of the United States by any of the unequal impositions or discriminations aforesaid, he shall, when he finds that the public interest will be served thereby, by proclamation specify and declare such new or additional rate or rates of duty as he shall determine will offset such burdens, not to exceed 50 per centum ad valorem or its equivalent, and on and after thirty days after the date of such proclamation there shall be levied, collected, and paid upon the articles enumerated in such proclamation when imported into the United States from such foreign country such new or additional rate or rates of duty; or, in case of articles declared subject to exclusion from importation into the United States under the provisions of subdivision (b) of this section, such articles shall be excluded from importation.

ACT OF 1930 (e) DUTIES TO OFFSET BENEFITS TO THIRD COUNTRY.-Whenever the President shall find as a fact that any foreign country imposes any unequal imposition or discrimination as aforesiad upon the commerce of the United States, or that any benefits accrue or are likely to accrue to any industry in any foreign country by reason of any such imposition or discrimination imposed by any foreign country other than the foreign country in which such industry is located, and whenever the President shall determine that any new or additional rate or rates of duty or any prohibition herein before provided for do not effectively remove such imposition or discrimination and that any benefits from any such imposition or discrimination accrue or are likely to accrue to any industry in any foreign country, he shall, when he finds that the public interest will be served thereby, by proclamation specify and declare such new or additional rate or rates of duty upon the articles wholly or in part the growth or product of any such industry as he shall determine will offset such benefits, not to exceed 50 per centum ad valorem or its equivalent, upon importation from any foreign country into the United States of such articles; and on and after thirty days after the date of any such proclamation such new or additional rate or rates of duty so specified and declared in such proclamation shall be levied, collected, and paid upon such articles. ACT OF 1913

ACT OF 1922 [No corresponding provision in act of 1913.]

(e) Whenever the President shall find as a fact that any foreign country imposes any unequal imposition or discrimination as aforesaid upon the commerce of the United States, or that any benefits accrue or are likely to accrue to any industry in any foreign country by reason of any such imposition or discrimination imposed by any foreign country other than the foreign country in which such industry is located, and whenever the President shall determine that any new or additional rate or rates of duty or any prohibition herein

before provided for do not effectively remove such imposition or discrimination and that any benefits from any such imposition or discrimination accrue or are likely to accrue to any industry in any foreign country, he shall, when he finds that the public interest will be served thereby, by proclamation specify and declare such new or additional rate or rates of duty upon the articles wholly or in part the growth or product of any such industry as he shall determine will offset such benefits, not to exceed 50 per centum ad valorem or its equivalent, upon importation from any foreign country into the United States of such articles and on and after thirty days after the date of any such proclamation such new or additional rate or rates of duty so specified and declared in such proclamation shall be levied, collected, and

paid upon such articles. (f) FORFEITURE OF ARTICLES.-All articles imported contrary to the provisions of this section shall be forfeited to the United States and shall be liable to be seized, prosecuted, and condemned in like manner and under the same regulations, restrictions, and provisions as may from time to time be established for the recovery, collection, distribution, and remission of forfeitures to the United States by the several revenue laws. Whenever the provisions of this Act shall be applicable to importations into the United States of articles wholly or in part the growth or product of any foreign country, they shall be applicable thereto whether such articles are imported directly or indirectly. [No corresponding provision in act of 1913.)

(f) All articles imported contrary to the provisions of this section shall be forfeited to the United States and shall be liable to be seized, prosecuted, and condemned in like manner and under the same regulations, restrictions, and provisions as may from time to time be established for the recovery, collection, distribution, and remission of forfeitures to the United States by the several revenue laws. Whenever the provisions of this Act shall be applicable to importations into the United States of articles wholly or in part the growth or product of any foreign country, they shall be applicable thereto whether such articles

are imported directly or indirectly. (g) ASCERTAINMENT BY COMMISSION OF DISCRIMINATIONS.-It shall be the duty of the commission to ascertain and at all times to be informed whether any of the discriminations against the commerce of the United States enumerated in subdivisions (a), (b), and (e) of this section are practiced by any country; and if and when such discriminatory acts are disclosed, it shall be the duty of the commission to bring the matter to the attention of the President, together with recommendations. [No corresponding provision in act of 1913.)

(g) It shall be the duty of the United States Tariff Commission to ascertain and at all times to be informed whether any of the discriminations against the commerce of the United States enumerated in subdivisions (a), (b), and (e) of this section are practiced by any country; and if and when such discriminatory acts are disclosed, it shall be the duty of the commission to bring the matter to the attention of the President, together with recommendations.

ACT OF 1930

(b) RULES AND REGULATIONS OF SECRETARY OF TREASURY.—The Secretary of the Treasury with the approval of the President shall make such rules and regulations as are necessary for the execution of such proclamations as the President may issue in accordance with the provisions of this section. ACT OF 1913

ACT OF 1922 (No corresponding provision in act of 1913.)

(h) The Secretary of the Treasury with the approval of the President shall make such rules and regulations as are necessary for the execution of such proclamations as the President may issue in

accordance with the provisions of this section. (i) DEFINITION.—When used in this section the term "foreign country" means any empire, country, dominion, colony or protectorate, or any subdivision or subdivisions thereof (other than the United States and its possessions), within which separate tariff rates or separate regulations of commerce are enforced. [No corresponding provision in act of 1913.]

(i) That when used in this section the term "foreign country” shall mean any empire, country, dominion, colony, or protectorate, or any subdivision or subdivisions thereof (other than the United States and its possessions), within which separate tariff rates or separate regulations of commerce are enforced.

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SEC. 339. EFFECT OF REENACTMENT OF EXISTING LAW.

Notwithstanding the repeal by section 651 of the laws relating to the United States Tariff Commission and their reenactment in sections 330 to 338, inclusive, with modifications, the unexpended balances of appropriations available for the commission at the time this section takes effect shall remain available for the commission in the administration of its functions under this Act; and such repeal and reenactment shall not operate to change the status of the officers and employees under the jurisdiction of the commission at the time this section takes effect. No investigation or other proceeding pending before the commission at such time (other than proceedings under section 315 of the Tariff Act of 1922) shall abate by reason of such repeal and reenactment, but shall continue under the provisions of this Act.

ACT OF 1913 [No corresponding provision.) 13

ACT OF 1922 [No corresponding provision.]

ACT OF 1930

SEC. 340. DOMESTIC VALUE-CONVERSION OF RATES.

(a) CONVERSION OF RATES BY COMMISSION.—The commission shall ascertain, with respect to each of the ad valorem rates of duty, and each of the rates of duty regulated by the value of the article, specified in this Act, an ad valorem rate (or a rate regulated by the value of the article, as the case may be) which if applied upon the basis of domestic value would have resulted as nearly as possible in the imposition, during the period from July 1, 1927, to June 30, 1929, both dates inclusive, of amounts of duty neither greater nor less than would have been collectible at the rate specified in this Act applied upon the basis of value defined in section 402 of the Tariff Act of 1922.

(b) REPORT TO CONGRESS BY COMMISSION.-The commission shall, as soon as practicable, but in no event later than July 1, 1932, submit a report to the Congress setting forth the classes of articles with respect to which the conversion of rates has been made, together with the converted rates applicable thereto.

(c) DATA TO BE FURNISHED BY SECRETARY OF TREASURY AND SECRETARY OF COMMERCE.—To assist the commission in carrying out the provisions of this section, the Secretary of the Treasury and the Secree tary of Commerce are authorized and directed to furnish to the commission, upon request, any data or information in the possession or control of their respective departments relating to the importation, entry, appraisement, and classification of merchandise and the collection of duties thereon. (d) DEFINITIONS.--When used in this section(1) The term “domestic value," applied with respect to imported merchandise, means

(A) the price at which such or similar imported merchandise is freely offered for sale, at the time of exportation of the imported merchandise, packed ready for delivery, in the principal market of the United States to all purchasers, in the usual wholesale quantities and in the ordinary course of trade, or

(B) if such or similar imported merchandise is not so offered for sale in the United States, then an esti. mated value, based on the price at which merchandise, whether imported or domestic, comparable in construction or use with the imported merchandise, is so offered for sale, with such adjustments as may be necessary owing to differences in size, material, construction, texture, and other differences.

(2) The term "rate of duty regulated by the value of the article" means a rate of duty regulated in any manner by the value of the article, and includes the value classification by which such rate is regulated. ACT OF 1913

ACT OF 1922 [No corresponding provisions.]

[No corresponding provisions.]

13 Sections 705 and 709 of the Revenue Act of 1916, which follow, are related to section 339 of the Act of 1930. SEC. 705. That upon the organization of the commission, the Cost of Production Division in the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce in the Department of Commerce shall be transferred to said commission, and the clerks and employees of said division shall be transferred to and become clerks and employees of the commission, and all records, papers, and property of the said division and of the former tariff board shall be transferred to and become the records, papers, and property of the commission.

SEC. 709. That there is hereby appropriated, for the purpose of defraying the expense of the establishment and maintenance of the commission, including the payment of salaries herein authorized, out of any money in the Treasury of the United States not otherwise appropriated, the sum of $300,000 for the fiscal year ending June thirtieth, nineteen hundred and seventeen, and for each' fiscal year thereafter a like sum is authorized to be appropriated.

ACT OF 1930

SEC. 341. INTERFERENCE WITH FUNCTIONS OF COMMISSION.

(a) IXTERFERING WITH OR INFLUENCING THE COMMISSION OR ITS EMPLOYEES.-It shall be unlawful for any person (1) to prevent or attempt to prevent, by force, intimidation, threat, or in any other man. ner, any member or employee of the commission from exercising the functions imposed upon the commission by this title, or (2) to induce, or attempt to induce, by like means any such member or employee to make any decision or order, or to take any action, with respect to any matter within the authority of the commission.

(b) PENALTY.-Any person who violates any of the provisions of this section shall, upon conviction thereof, be fined not more than $1,000 or imprisonment for not more than one year, or both.

(c) DEFINITION.-As used in this section the term “person” includes an individual, corporation, association, partnership, or any other organization or group of individuals.

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ACT OF 1930 SEC. 401. MISCELLANEOUS.

When used in this title or in Part I of Title III

(a) VESSEL.—The word “vessel” includes every description of water craft or other contrivance used, or capable of being used, as a means of transportation in water, but does not include aircraft.

ACT OF 1913

ACT OF 1922

[No corresponding provision.)

SECTION 401. When used in this title

(a) VESSEL.—The word “vessel” includes every description of water craft or other contrivance used, or capable of being used, as a means of transporta

tion in water or in water and in air. (b) VEHICLE.—The word "vehicle” includes every description of carriage or other contrivance used, or capable of being used, as a means of transportation on land, but does not include aircraft. (No corresponding provision in act of 1913.)

(b) VEHICLE.—The word “vehicle” includes every description of carriage or other contrivance used, or capable of being used, as a means of trans

portation on land, or through the air. (C) MERCHANDISE.-The word “merchandise” means goods, wares, and chattels of every description and includes merchandise the importation of which is prohibited. (No corresponding provision in act of 1913.)

(c) MERCHANDISE.—The word “merchandise" means goods, wares, and chattels of every description and includes merchandise the importation of

which is prohibited. (d) PERSON.—The word “person" includes partnerships, associations, and corporations. i [No corresponding provision in act of 1913.)

(d) PERSON.-The word “person" includes

partnerships, associations, and corporations. (e) MASTER.—The word “master” means the person having the command of the vessel. (No corresponding provision in act of 1913.)

(e) MASTER.- The word “master” means the

person having the command of the vessel. (f) DAY.-The word "day" means the time from eight o'clock antemeridian to five o'clock postmeridian. [No corresponding provision in act of 1913.)

(1) DAY.-The word "day" means the time from eight o'clock antemeridian to five o'clock post.

meridian. (g) Night.-The word "night” means the time from five o'clock postmeridian to eight o'clock antemeridian. (No corresponding provision in act of 1913.)

(g) NIGHT.-The word "night” means the time from five o'clock postmeridian to eight o'clock

antemeridian. (h) COLLECTOR.-The word "collector” means collector of customs and includes assistant collector of customs, deputy collector of customs and any person authorized by law or by regulations of the Secretary of the Treasury to perform the duties of a collector of customs. [No corresponding provision in act of 1913.)

(h) COLLECTOR.—The word “collector" means the collector of customs, and includes a deputy collector of customs and any person authorized by law or by regulations of the Secretary of the Treas

ury to perform the duties of collector of customs. (i) COMPTROLLER OF CUSTOMS.—The term “comptroller of customs” includes assistant comptroller of customs and any person authorized by law or by regulations of the Secretary of the Treasury to perform the duties of a comptroller of customs. [No corresponding provision in act of 1913.]

[No corresponding provision in act of 1922.]

ACT OF 1930 (j) APPRAISER.– The word “appraiser” means appraiser of merchandise and includes chief assistant appraiser and any person authorized by law or by regulations of the Secretary of the Treasury to perform the duties of an appraiser, but does not include the United States Customs Court or any division or judge thereof. ACT OF 1913

ACT OF 1922

[No corresponding provision in act of 1913.)

(i) APPRAISER.--The word “appraiser" means the person authorized by law, or by the Secretary of the Treasury, to appraise imported merchandise

and to make a return of the value thereof. (k) UNITED STATES.-The term “United States" includes all Territories and possessions of the United States, except the Philippine Islands, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and the island of Guam. (No corresponding provision in act of 1913.)

(j) The term “United States" includes all Terri. tories and possessions of the United States, except the Philippine Islands, the Virgin Islands, and the islands of Guam and Tutuila.

ACT OF 1930 SEC. 402. VALUE.

(a) BASIS.-For the purposes of this Act the value of imported merchandise shall be(1) The foreign value or the export value, whichever is higher;

ACT OF 1913

ACT OF 1922

[No corresponding provision.]

SEC. 402. VALUE.--(a) For the purposes of this Act the value of imported merchandise shall be

(1) The foreign value or the export value ,which

ever is higher; (2) If the appraiser determines that neither the foreign value nor the export value can be satisfactorily ascertained, then the United States value; (No corresponding provision in act of 1913.)

(2) If neither the foreign value nor the export value can be ascertained to the satisfaction of the

appraising officers, then the United States value; (3) If the appraiser determines that neither the foreign value, the export value, nor the United States value can be satisfactorily ascertained, then the cost of production; [No corresponding provision in act of 1913.)

(3) If neither the foreign value, the export value, nor the United States value can be ascertained to the satisfaction of the appraising officers, then the

cost of production; (4) In the case of an article with respect to which there is in effect under section 336 a rate of duty based upon the American selling price of a domestic article, then the American selling price of such article. (No corresponding provision in act of 1913.]

(4) If there be any similar competitive article manufactured or produced in the United States of a class or kind upon which the President has made public a finding as provided in subdivision (b) of section 315 of Title III of this Act, then the American

selling price of such article. (b) REVIEW OF APPRAISER'S DECISION.-A decision of the appraiser that foreign value, export value, or United States value can not be satisfactorily accertained shall be subject to review in reappraisement proceedings under section 501; but in any such proceeding, an affidavit executed outside of the United States shall not be admitted in evidence if executed by any person who fails to permit a Treasury attaché to inspect his books, papers, records, accounts, documents, or correspondence, pertaining to the value or classification of such merchandise. [No corresponding provision in act of 1913.]

[No corresponding provision in act of 1922.1 (c) FOREIGN VALUE.—The foreign value of imported merchandise shall be the market value or the price at the time of exportation of such merchandise to the United States, at which such or similar merchandise is freely offered for sale to all purchasers in the principal markets of the country from which exported, in the usual wholesale quantities and in the ordinary course of trade, including the cost of all containers and coverings of whatever nature, and all other costs, charges, and expenses incident to placing the merchandise in condition, packed ready for shipment to the United States. [No corresponding provision in act of 1913.)

(b) The foreign value of imported merchandise shall be the market value or the price at the time of exportation of such merchandise to the United States, at which such or similar merchandise is freely offered for sale to all purchasers in the principal markets of the country from which exported, in the usual wholesale quantities and in the ordinary course of trade, including the cost of all containers and coverings of whatever nature, and all other costs, charges, and expenses incident to placing the merchandise in condition, packed ready for shipment to the United States.

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