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Statement of moneys appropriated by the Commissioners for the Hospital for the Insane,

at Independence, Iowa.

David Armstrong's first contract .... $88,114.00
Subsequent contract for additional work .. 2,658.03
Commissioners' per diem and expenses... 3,655.05
Advertising proposals.

112.00
Architect, plans, specifications, etc... 3,600.00
Superintendent, per diem, stationery, ex-
penses

2,157.81

Total

$100,296-89

Amonnt appropriated by the legislature... 125,000.00
Balance unappropriated by commissioners,

December 1st, 1869.

$24,703.

[B.]

Estimated cost for the erection of a barn, for fencing in the land, setting out trees, and improving grounds, aud constructing a horse railroad from the Hospital to

the Dubuque & Sioux City Railroad.

Barn ....
Fence, 1280 rods at $300

per

rod Setting out trees and improving grounds . Horse railroad, 500 rod at $6.50 per rod

$ 4,000.00

3,840.00 1,500.00 3,250.00

$12,590.00

GEORGE JOSSELYN, Superintendent of Construction.

[C.]

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF CONSTRUCTION TO THE

COMMISSIONERS.

To the Board of Commissioners for the State Hospital for the

Insane at Independence, Iowa. GENTLEMEN : I submit to you the following statement of the present condition of the portion of the new building for an additional hospital for the insane, now in progress of erection under the contract of David Armstrong, and of the amount of money paid on the estimates made for labor and materials furnished for the building up to this time:

In consequence of the past summer and fall be unusually wet, the contractor has been unable to get the wall of the building any higher than one story above the basement. He has, however, a considerable portion of the joists for the second floor on, so that he has been able to cover the walls in such a manner as to protect them effectually from the snow and rain. The foundation walls, both inside and out, have also been banked up with earth and straw, to prevent any frost getting under them, and drains cut through the basement to carry off any accumulation of water, so that the building is thoroughly protected for the winter.

The contractor has succeeded in making on the west end of the hospital farm, where excellent brick clay has been found, some 800,000 brick, of which 580,000 have been laid in the building, leaving about 220,000 on hand for use in the spring. He is also contracting for a sufficient quantity of wood to be delivered at the brickyard this winter, to burn the remaining amount of brick necessary to fill his contract, which will be about 600,000 more. A large quantity of sand has already been hauled on the ground and a sufficient quantity to do all the mason work and plastering will be delivered there this winter, should the roads be in such a condition that hauling can be done.

Although the roads, the greater portion of the season, have been very bad, the amount of stone that have been hauled will be sufficient to carry the walls of the building up another story, and by having them cut this winter, which he is doing, with the amount of brick on hand, the work can commence early in the spring without delay, and by the middle of June or the first of July, the walls can be ready for the roof. He purposes, also, having all the doors, sash, door and window frames made this winter, so as to have them ready when needed, and by that means have the work thoroughly seasoned before placing it in the building.

The iron stairways, iron floor beams for bath rooms and water closets and the register frames are all on the ground ready for use the iron window guards, iron cornices and slate for the roof will be ordered early in the spring.

The work has not progressed as rapidly as it might have done, had the contractor not had many difficulties to contend with, such as bad weather, at times impassable roads over which heavy material had to be hauled, and the delay caused in testing the quality of the clay for making brick; besides, the yards being new and kept wet by the constant rains, the brick could not dry as rapidly as they otherwise would. But I see no reason, with the amount of material on hand, if the work is vigorously pushed in the spring, why the contractor should not complete the building by the time specified in his contract

The whole amount estimated for labor and materials in the building, as well as on hand to this date, Dec. 1st, 1869, $34,668.70, twenty-five per cent of which has been retained, $8,749.67, leaving a balance of $26.249.03, which amount has been paid the contractor.

Very respectfully yours,

GEO. JOSSELYN, Superintendent of Construction.

OF THE

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

OF THE

STATE AGRICULTURAL

COLLEGE AND FARM,

TO THE

GOVERNOR OF IOWA

AND THE

THIRTEENTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY.

JANUARY, 1870.

DES MOINES:
F. M. MILLS, STATE PRINTER.

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