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can find a foreign market for that additional quan- Here is a difference of $89,000,000 in the way of That is the same, in effect, as it would be to retity. That is the difficulty. Cotton must find a debtor and creditor,

move the duties on foreign importations, and give market, if it is only at one cent per pound. You But let me call the attention of the gentleman to them a cheap and free transit. A tariff of thirty must put it into the hands of the manufacturer and from Massachusetts, (Mr. Rantoul,) and of the per cent. is an obstruction between New York and take such prices as he can afford to give.

House, to one other table, and that is the one London. The hills and rocks and rivers are the Having accounted for the increased amount of which shows the effects of the two tariffs upon the obstructions between Lowell and Missouri

. It exportation since 1846, by the fact that 160,000 | iron interest.

has been the business of England to use these hales of cotton, formerly manufactured here, were The importations of iron from 1843 to 1851, ! means to prevent the establishment of manufacsent abroad, I proceed to show that the amount inclusive, omiving fractions, was as follows:

tories on our “ Eastern slope," for many years. of exportation of articles of agricultural produce,

In 1844.

89,000 tons.

It has been ours to counteract them. The strug. other than cotton, have been greatly and uniformly

In 1845.

96,000

gle has continued during the whole period of diminished by the tariff of 1846, and increased by

our existence as a pation. I am afraid we are In 1846.

69,000 " that of 1842.

In 1847.

60,000 The tariff of 1842 did not, to any extent, get

about to pull down the barriers, and give up the In 1848.

.153,000

contest. "If we do, the gentleman's own logic into operation before 1843, nor was its career

In 1849.

.289,000 (+

shows that we will be to England what he wishes materially broken off before 1847. The capital in

In 1850.

.337,000 "

to make Missouri to his manufactories on the vested was not withdrawn to any considerable

In 1851...

..341,000 " “Eastern slope"-hewers of wood and drawers of extent until about the latter period. But in order

water and that, too, without any wood to hew, to be fair, I have put the year 1847-the year of

I have not the amount for the year 1843, but I or water to draw. The East will then be mere the famine-into each period, making the first believe it is larger than that of the succeeding conduit pipes, through which to carry the agriculperiod run from 1842 to 1847 inclusive, and the year.

tural products of the valley of the Mississippi to fatter from 1847 to 1851 inclusive. Here is the Here is another musical swell-steps up, up, Europe. In that state of things the gentleman table: and then down again; and yet the gentleman from thinks he sees the future glory of this country.

Mr. Speaker, my plan is the converse of all Value of breadstuffs and provisions exported annually | Massachusetts (Mr. RanTOUL) advances an argufrom 1843 to 1851, inclusive-omitting fractions.

ment designed to prove-if it was designed to prove this. I desire, so far as we reasonably can, to do In 1843..

anything that the importation of iron has been di- our own manufacturing; to live within our own

$11,000,000 In 1844.

minished by free trade, and increased by a protect- resources, and keep out of debt; to husband our 16,000,000

ive tariff. By this table, you will perceive the ex- means, and build our own roads with our own In 1845.

17,000,000

ports of iron, from '43 to '47 inclusive, runs down In 1846.

money, and not with money borrowed from Enga 27,000,000 In 1847

from 89,000 ions to 60,000 tons, and that from '48 land, and for which we are mortgaging the roads

68,000,000 In 1848.

to '5l inclusive, they run up from 153,000 to 341,000 as fast as made, as well as the lands through

37,000,000 In 1849.

tons. That is the importation of iron alone. which they pass. I think, Mr. Speaker, that bank

38,000,000 In 1850.

The gentleman from Massachusetts says, that ruptey will be the future of this country, if we

26,000,000 In 1851.

in 1840 we manufactured only 295,000 bales of follow out his views. 21,000,000

cotton, and that in 1850 we manufactured 641,000 But I will not follow the gentleman further. Now here is a regular flight of steps. You bales. For what purpose is that comparison niade: This is no place for a tariff speech. When a proper have to go up one set and come down the other.

Why, to prove that the tariff of 1846 has increased | occasion occurs, I may say more upon the subject. It is as plain as argument can make it. It is like

the amount of the manufacture of doinestic cotton. Mr. BENNETT obtained the floor. a swell in music. “And yet the gentleman from Does the gentleman believe that proposition? Can Mr. HUNTER. I wish to inquire whether Massachusetts argues to Missouri farmers that he believe it? The tables will show him, as I have the amendment of my colleague [Mr. Welcu) the quantity of exports of agricultural production said, that the domestic manufacture of cotton has was read yesterday simply for information, or has increased under the tariff of 1846, and dimin- fallen off 160,000 bales since 1846. Let him com- whether it is now under consideration? ished under the tariff of 1842. As I remarked, I pare the years 1846 and 1851, and he will see that The SPEAKER. It was read only for inforam bound charitably to conclude that he has not there is that difference in favor of the former year. || mation. looked over these tables. Commencing with 1843, He says, that the domestic manufacture of cotton Mr. GREY. I would ask the gentleman from the swell increases regularly till 1847, and then has quadrupled within the last twenty years. Sup- New York (Mr. BENNETT) to allow an amenddiminishes down to the present time, thus: 68, 37, | pose it has, what has effected the result? The ment, which I intend to offer at a proper time, to 38, 26, 21. At 1851 you are almost brought back | tariffs of 1828, 1832, and 1842. No thanks, for be read to this House. again to the original eleven millions from which that result, to the tariff of 1846. Its work has Mr. BENNETT. I have an amendment which you set out in 1843. If gentlemen do not believe been all in the opposite direction.

will consume considerable time. that the tariff of 1842 increased the quantity of The same may be said of iron, the domestic man- Mr. GREY. I only wapt my amendment read. exports, here are the figures, and they may ex. ufacture of which, says the gentleman, has in the Mr. BENNETT. Other gentlemen will desire amine them for themselves. But here is another table: This gives the entire ! 627,000 tons. That is the work of our protective last twenty years, increased from 165,000 tons to the same privilege. Mr. Speaker, before proceeding

with this debate, and to say what I have to say amount of exports, including cotton, and also the tariffs of 1828, 1832, and 1842. The effect of the about this bill, I desire to propose an amendment, entire amount of imports; showing, also, the tariff of 1846 on iron, is shown by the tables. It or rather a substitute for the bill

. I move that amount of specie exported, and the balance against increased the importation from 60,000 tons in the bill be recommitted, or referred back to the us, from 1843 to 1847, inclusive, omitting fractions. | 1846, to 341,000 tons in 1851. How can the gen- Committee on Public Lands, with instructions to These items the gentleman from Massachusetts tleman, then, take any credit to the tariff of 1846, has wholly omitted. This table shows that the from the increase of the domestic manufacture of to the Speaker's table.

report as a substitute for it the bill which I send exports from 1843 to 1847 were:

iron during the last twenty years? None is due The bill sent up to the Chair was the bill introDomestic produce..

$529,000,000 to it. Had we been under its blighting influences duced, with the following additional sections: Specie. ... 28,000,000 during the whole period, that branch of business

Sec. 7. And be it further enacted, that there is herebyserReëxported

32,000,000 would have languished and died out, and Eng. erally granted to each State in which there are public lands,

land would now be furnishing us all onr iron; and to aid in the construction of railroads, except thnt State to Making in all.. $589,000,000 such will be the result, should that tariff be suf

which the largest amount has been granted for that purpose Total imports.... 558,000,000 fered to continue for twenty years to come.

a sufficient amount of the lands of the United States, in

cluding the amount (if any) heretofore granted for the pur But in the midst of the gentleman's free trade pose aforesaid, to each of said States respectively, to make Balance, for us.......... $31,000,000 argument, he says, among other things, "take off

each of said States equal according to representation by the Showing a balance of $31,000,000 in our favor, | your restrictions and limitations, and let the raw

last census, in the grants of land for railroad purposes, and

a grant of the right of way and to aid in the construction with an exportation of specie to only $28,000,000; materials come in free." Why, Mr. Speaker, that of railroads in said States respectively, to the amount aforeso that we might have kept our specie at home, and

is a tariff argument, and not a free trade argument. said, is hereby severally made to each of said States on the still been creditors to the amount of $3,000,000. What is that but a restriction and limitation on same terms, with the same reservations, and upon the same That is from the period from 1843 to 1847, in- commerce. It is nothing else, unless you propose

conditions in every respect as are contained in the act en

titled " An act granting the right of way and making a grad clusive. How is it with the period covered by to let everything come in free, and to raise your of land to the States of Illinois, Mississippi, and Alabama, the present tariff, from 1847 to 1851, inclusive? revenue by direct taxation. I, too, say, lei the in aid of the construction of a railroad from Chicago to Mo It is as follows: raw material come in free, or, at least, with dis

bile," passed September 20, 1850, and all the provisions of

said act are hereby extended and applied to the grants Total imports and exports from 1847 to 1851, in- criminations in favor of its importation. That is clusive, omitting fractions. one of the two leading principles of a protective

hereby made to the said several States, and to all railroads

in proportion to their length, made in any of said States
tariff; low duties on raw materials, and higher wholly, or in part, by means of the land granted by this
Exports.-Specie.....
$61,000,000 duties on the manufactured article. Both look to

The amount of land to which each of said States shall
Domestic produce... 724,000,000
Reëxported.....
the encouragement of the domestic manufacture.

be entitled under this act, shall be determined in conformity 41,000,000

thereto by the Commissioner of Public Lands, and located The gentleman favors one, but opposes the other. under such regulations as he may prescribe. Each State, Total exports....

The gentleman's leading idea seems to be to so far as may be, shall locate its lands within its own lim$826,000,000 open up roads to the West, as a

means" to preTot imports for the same

its : Prorided, The lands hereby granted, shall be used to

construct or aid in constructing railroads, and so much as period.....

vent the springing up of manufactures in the West. • $851,000,000

remains undisposed of for more than ten years after it has His means are good, but his end is, in my opin- been located, shall revert to the United States. ion, bad. Has it ever occurred to the gentleman

Sec. 8. And be it further enacted, that there is hereby Balance, against us........ $25,000,000 that here is another high protective tariff doctrine

severally granted to each State in which the United States This balance against us, added to the $61,000,000 of his? Means to keep down, or break down,

have no public lands, a sufficient amount of public lands of specie exported, makes a total balance against manufacturing in the West, for the benefit of spectively, according to representation by the last centes

;

for railroad purposes, to grant to each of said States te us, from 1847 to 1851, inclusive, of $86,000,000. | manufacturers" on the “ Eastern slope!" That one half the amount granted to the first mentioned States, In the other case, from 1843 to 1847, inclusive, doctrine from a free trade man! What means?

for the same purpose. The United States mail shall be u the same balance was $3,000,000 in our favor. || Why, to cheapen and facilitate the transportation.

all times transported on the railroads made, either wholis, or in part, by means of lands granted by this act, under the

act.

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directions of the Post Office Department, and for such prices California. ....

500,000.00 acres. Mr. DUNHAM, (interposing.) Mr. Speaker, as Congress may by law direct; and all the provisions of Minnesota Territory. the said act for aiding in the construction of the railroad

2,997,191.00 has not the morning hour expired ? from Chicago to Mobile, so far as the same can be made Oregon Territory .12,186,978.00

The SPEAKER. It has. applicable, are hereby extended and applied to all railroads New Mexico..

7,493,120.00

Mr. DUNHAM.. I then move that the House made wholly, or in part, by means of land hereby granted. Utah.... The amount to which each of the said last mentioned States

6,681,707.00 proceed to the business upon the Speaker's table. shall be entitled to be determined by the Commissioner of

(Cries of “No!” “No!” “Let him go on Public Lands, in conformity with this act, and located under Total......

.84,222,184.12 with his speech!") such regulations as he may prescribe; but no State shall

Mr. CLEVELAND. This is the only argulucate any of the lands bereby granted within the limits of any other state without its consent: Provided, The lands And there have been sold of the public lands

ment that has been advanced upon the other side

of the question. structing railroads, and shall not be sold for higher prices only one hundred and one millions and some odd than the United States lands are sold, and so much as reacres. So that there has been actually given away,

The question was taken, and, upon a division, mains undisposed of for more than ten years after the same by grants to the new States and to the Territories,

there were-ayes 45, noes not counted. has been located, shall revert to the United States. an amount of the public domain equal to all that

Mr. HOUSTON. I call for the yeas and nays. Sec. 9. And be it further enacted, That the amount of has been sold for the public benefit, less only by | It is important that the special order should be lands granted to the State of Missouri by this act, to aid in the construction of the railroads mentioned in the first sec

about 16,000,000 of acres. This fact ought to be disposed of. tion thereof, shall be dedueted from the amount to which borne in mind. So far as lands are sold, and the

The yeas and nays were not ordered. the State of Missouri shall be entitled under the sec- proceeds thereof paid into the Treasury of the

Mr. CLINGMAN called for tellers; which were tion of this act. United States, they are disposed of for the benefit

not ordered. The SPEAKER. There is a motion pending of all the States.

Mr. CLEVELAND. The gentleman from to commit the bill to the Committee of the whole New York was the first State that ceded her New York says that it is immaterial to him House on the state of the Union, and it is not in lands to the General Government, and in her ces- whether he proceeds now or waits until to-morrow order either to amend the bill, or to commit it to any sion thereof she expressly asserted that it was to

morning. He is willing to continue his remarks other committee, until the vote is taken upon the place them as "a common fund to defray the ex

on to-morrow, and I make this statement with the pending motion to commit.

penses of the war." Virginia, North Carolina, object of preventing the unnecessary consumption Mr. BENNETT. I did not suppose that my South Carolina, and Georgia, made similar ces of time. motion would be in order until the pending motion sions, and in every one of ihem it was expressed

The question was again taken upon the motion shall have been disposed of. But cannot the mo- | that the lands thus ceded were to be used for the to proceed to the business upon the Speaker's tion be entertained and decided after the pending "common benefit” of all the States.

table; and, upon a division, there were-ayes 59, motion has been voted upon?

What is the practical effect of these grants ?

noes 48-no quorum. The SPEAKER. It cannot. The practical effect, and the claim here set up is,

Mr. TAYLOR. It is very evident that the Mr. BENNETT. Then I give notice that I || that as far as the lands are granted to the States,

House did not understand the question, and I intend to submit such a motion. Mr. Speaker, I entertain some views upon this and you may go on granting as much as you they belong exclusively to the twelve land States, hope tellers may be ordered.

Mr. CABELL, of Florida. Tellers have been

refused. subject differing somewhat from those which have choose; and yet the old States have no right to been presented to the House. In regard to this bill, || share in these grants. My opinion may be very

Mr. MARSHALL, of Kentucky. I move for it will be remarked that it is only one, and the first different from that of other gentlemen here, but

a call of the House. of a series of bills, to be hereafter introduced, of a | my opinion is, that it is not justice to the old

Mr. ORR. By unanimous consent I think telsimilar character. This is the first of the railroad States to grant so much land to the Western States.

lers may be ordered. bills. There have been presented to the Commit- I claim for the old States only justice, and I am Mr. MARSHALL withdrew his motion for a tee on Public Lands probably some thirty bills for willing to do justice and to be generous to the call. their consideration, of a liké character with this; | Western States. I do not want lo be unjust or There being no objection, tellers were ordered; and from this number some thirteen or more are ungenerous to them. I do insist, however, that and Messrs. P. King and Fowler were appointed. to be reported upon favorably to this House. As | while large grants are made to them for railroad The question upon the motion to proceed to the many more have been presented in the Senate and purposes, the old Siates have a right to ask

grants business upon the Speaker's table, was again are under consideration. If these bills succeed, for the same purpose, to some extent at least. And taken, and decided in the affirmative—the tellers they will make immense grants-amounting to it is as right for the one as for the other. We having reported—ayes 76, noes not counted. many millions of acres of the public domain—to have but one Constitution, and all the States are Mr. JONES, of Tennessee. I move that he aid in the construction of railroads. There is no upon an equal footing by the Constitution and House resolve itself into the Committee of the State in which there are public lands but will ap- || the laws, and these lands are the common prop

Whole on the state of the Union. ply for this aid for one or two or more roads. "Il erty of all the States. I should like to know how

KOSSUTH'S LETTER OF THANKS. am not one of those who believe that grants of one or a dozen of these States are constitutionally this kind are unconstitutional. Neither do I think | entitled to these grants, and yet it is unconstitu

The SPEAKER. The first business in order that an open question. If anything can be settled tional to make them to the others? Upon what is on the motion to print the communication from by the action of the Government, that question is principle is it? If it is right to grant lands for one the President of the United States, transmitting a settled; because it has been the practice of the road, it is right to make grants for another.

letter of thanks from Louis Kossuth to the Gov. Government, for thirty years, to grant these lands

There is an ingenious argument used here, which ernment and Congress of the United States, upon to the several States for the construction of roads I shall notice. It is this: You have no right to which the gentleman from Maryland (Mr. Evans) and canals; so that the whole argument of the gen- | ask these grants for the old States. Why? Be- || is entitled to the floor. tleman who last but one addressed the committee | cause the western States double the value of the

Mr. ANDREWS. Some two weeks since I on this subject, [Mr. Orr,] to show the constitu- | alternate sections on each side of the road, and introduced to the House resolutions passed by the tionality of it, it seems to me, was to prove a point | therefore you have no right to ask these lands for Legislature of Maine. I intended then to have decided. This is no objection to me. I believe it the old States, for they cannot do that

. If gen- | submitted some remarks upon them, but had not is constitutional to make these grants; and I be- tlemen will look into these railroad bills, they will the opportunity. I would bey as a favor of the lieve that that question has been settled by the

find that the roads proposed for the purpose of gentleman from Maryland, that he will yield me action of the Government, by every Congress, and getting their sections have a range of thirty miles the floor, that I may now present my views. by the decisions of the courts. -fifteen on each side of the road-to locate their

Mr. EVANS yielded for that purpose. But in justice, some provisions should be made sections upon. Every one knows that railroads

Mr. ANDREWS then addressed the House in for the old States, also, out of these public lands; are not made where there are no settlements. || favor of the Maine resolutions and on the quesand it is to that I wish to call the attention of the They are constructed for business purposes bestion of intervention. His remarks will be found House upon this occasion. It is not known gen- ween settlements, and villages, and cities. They in the Appendix. erally what the amounts of these grants are, and are usually made through the most settled parts

Mr. A. having concludedI have taken some pains to ascertain how much of the country, and consequently will pass through The SPEAKER. The gentleman from Maryhas already been granted to the new States and lands located and settled. For this reason it is | land (Mr. Evans) is entitled to the floor. to the Territories. For that purpose 1 have an that they must have thirty miles in width from Mr. DUNHAM. I hope now that the gentleofficial statement from the Land Office, which which to make their selection, in order to get their man from Maryland will yield for a motion that shows that there has been granted to the land lands, which they are to take in alternate sections. || the House resolve itself into the Committee of the States--some twelve in number—for all purposes, | How is it with the other sections left for the Gov- Whole on the state of the Union. and to the Territories, 84,000,000 and over of the ernment? By the law they are doubled for only Mr. EVANS. If it is the desire of the House public lands. There has been granted to a part of six miles on each side of the road, making in all that the consideration of the bounty land bill shall these States, as follows:

twelve miles; therefore less than one half as be proceeded with, as I am indebted to my friends Ohio....

2,273,858.77 acres. much land as is granted to the roads is doubled in for many favors, I will yield the floor until toIndiana.

3,267,460.61 price in point of fact. Only the land lying in a morrow. In thus yielding, it is understood that I Illinois..

5,584,167.94 strip two fifths as wide as is granted to the roads still retain my right to the floor. Missouri

3,242,627.00 from which to make their selection, is doubled in Mr. DUNHAM moved that the House resolve Alabama

2,094,284.00 price to the Government. This two fifths lying itself into the Committee of the Whole on the state Mississippi

4,151,011.00 along the road is the part most thickly settled, and of the Union; which motion was agreed to. Louisiana...

.10,210,122.58 on which, therefore, will be found the least land The House accordingly resolved itself into Michigan.

6,170,866.00 in proportion for the road. I believe it may be Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union, Arkansas.

6,250,813.00 safely said that these road bills will not double the (Mr. Olds in the chair.). Florida.

2,022,993.00 price of one half as much land as is granteil to The CHAIRMAN. The special order before Iowa.

2,713,955.22 the roads; and in addition to that, not one half the committee is joint resolution No. 1, explanaWisconsin.

3,128,799.00 of the land doubled in price will probably ever be tory of the act approved September 28, 1850, Tennessee.. 3,353,824.00 sold at that double price.

granting bounty land to certain officers and sol

cases.

diers who have been in the military service of the the Revolution. W by these troops stationed there his length of service; or in case of the death of any such United States. would have been in their proper place. When

soldier or othcer, the warrant to be issued may be granted When the committee rose on yesterday, the men engage in the service of the United States

to such person or persons as would be entities under the

act of 1850, above mentioned, or any other act, as if this question pending was the motion of the gentleman they obey the officers, and remain where they are

enactment had constituted a part thereof: Prorided, That from Ohio (Mr. CartTER) to amend the amend- ordered to be placed while they are in such ser- nothing herein contained shall be so construed as to grant

more than one hundred and sixty acres of land to any pera ment of his colleague, (Mr. GAYLORD,) to strike | vice. It seems to me a narrow, straightened, ab

son who may already be entitled to it under the act above out the third section of the joint resolution, and to surd, and most erroneous construction, to say that mentioned for his services in any one war. insert in lieu thereof the fourth section of the Sen- those troops who did not get to Mexico-ihose And be it further enacted, That the warrants of one hunate bill,

stationed upon our frontier, upon our sea-coast, or dred and sixty acres, so as above to be issued, shall be asThe amendment of Mr. CARTTER was read, as upon the border of the Rio Grande—for a lar signable. follows: body of them were there—should be excluded from

ind be it further enacted, That the act of September 28,

1850, is hereby extended to all naval officers, sailors, tintilla And it is further provided. That the persons entitled to

the benefits of this bounty. I regard the case of men, and marines serving with land troops in cases where bounty land under the provisions of this act, or of the act these persons, therefore, as coming within the they could not be entitled to prize money. to which this is an annendment, and who may be residents

equitable provisions of that act, as well as its plain Mr. E. said: I am aware that there are persons of said 'Territory of Oregon at the date of the passage of

meaning. There is but one single company in this act, or wbo may hereafter become residents of said

upon the floor of this House, who think, because Territory, shall be permitted to locate their warrants upon

that situation to be included in my amendment, this bill is just, it will be lost. I have, however, any unclained lands in said Territory, and that upon such and I hope the committee will adopi it. They are a better opinion of the judgment, and discretion, survey and location patents shall issue therefor, as in other desirous of being included among those entitled to

and probity of members. There seem to be many this bounty, and having received many letters on words coniained in the additional section I have Upon this question tellers were ordered, and

this subject, I have felt that it was my duty to Messrs. HEBard and TOWNSHEND appointed.

offered, but the whole matter may be embraced in make the motion, and I hope the committee will The question was taken upon the amendment of adopt the amendment.

a statement or two. The last section proposes to Mr. Carter, and it was disagreed to-the tellers

give bounty land to those marines who served on Mr. DUNHAM. What is the section?

shore with the land troops, in ses where they having reported—ayes 22, noes not counted. Mr. CLINGMAN. It is the fifth section of the would not be entitled to prize money. I will give

The question then recurring upon the amend- act approved July 19, 1848, and my motion is the committee an illustration of the justice of such ment of Mr. GAYLORD, to strike out the third sec

80 to amend the bill as to extend its provisions to a provision. In the war with Great Britain there tion, and in lieu thereof to insert the fourth section

those individuals. I think the act ought to be of the Senate bill, it was put and agreed to.

was a battle fought at a place called Bladensburg, construed so as to embrace them without any furMr. CLINGMAN. I offer the following amend

not a great way from this Capitol. It is a fact in ther provision. The Department does not put that ment, to come in as an addition to the section that

the knowledge of all those who pretend to know consiruction upon it. has just been adopted:

anything of the history of their country, that every The question was then taken upon Mr. Cling-body ran away from there except a few of the And that the provisions of the fifth section of the act of Man's amendment, and it was rejected.

flotisla men and marines, under Commodore BarJuly 19, 1848, granting three months' extra pay to the soldiers and officers of the Mexicau war, be extended so as to

Mr. BELL. I propose to amend the same sec- ney. Those who ran away have received or are include the North Carolinia recruits, taken into the sertion by adding the following, viz:

entitled to bounty land, but Barney and his men vice by Lieutenant James W. Tathanı, and discharged at That the provisions of the act entitled “ An act granting l got none. I know it has been heretofore a part of Fort Moultrie, after nearly twelve months' service.

bounty land to certain officers and soldiers who have been The CHAIRMAN. This is the same amendengaged in the military service of the United States,” passed

the principle of those who were engaged in these September 28, 1850, be and are hereby intended to and for transactions, to reward the unmeritorious and neg. ment that was offered when we were in committee the service or any commissioned officer, musician, or pri- lect those who are really meritorious. I hope upon the Senate bill. The Chair thinks the amend. vate, who engaged to serve for a detinite or indefinite period

that practice will be now abandoned. I hope, in ment is in order, but he feels constrained, in con

of time, and actually did serve some time, though less than
thirty days in any of said wars enumerated in the first sec-

view of this great series of compromise land meassequence of the decision of the committee then tion of said act, so as to allow to such person or persons en

ures, that a little returning sense of justice will made, to rule it out of order. titled thereto forty acres.

actuate the members of the House, and that they Mr. CLINGMAN. I will beg leave to say that Mr. BELL. I have but a word or two to say will see the necessity of putting this matter right. this is a different bill from the other one. I then upon this amendment. If it should prevail, it The other section proposes also, that any man thought the decision of the Chair was right, and I will relieve all those enumerated in the act of who was actually in any battle or encounter with hope the Chair will decide this question independ. 1850, who actually served in war the length of the enemy of his country, no matter whether he had ently of that decision. The gentleman who at time they agreed to serve, or had served any served a month or not, shall receive bounty land that time took exception is now satisfied that it is length of time, although it was less than thirty days. for his service. I take it for granted that gentle in order.

It is placed upon the same principle, so far as re- men will not attempt a contradiction of what I The CHAIRMAN. This is precisely a similar gards that, embraced in the section referred to by say, that the man who has been actually engaged amendment, and the Chair rules it out of order. ihe honorable gentleman from North Carolina in a serious encounter with the enemy, as some of Does the gentleman take an appeal?

(Mr. Clingman) in the Mexican bounty land bill. our gallant friends have been, only for a few Mr. CLINGMAN. I do as a matter of form, There is in the law of 1850, a restriction to those hours, is at least as deserving of bounty land as understanding that the objection has been with- who shall have served thirty days. I know men those who ran away from Bladensburg, or disdrawn.

in the State of Ohio, who marched from near the graced themselves by surrender.. He who has The question was put, and the decision of the city of Cincinnati to Sandusky, and who were been five years in the service of his country, and Chair was overruled-ayes 35, noes not counted. | discharged there. Their time was not counted, performed garrison duty, is not more meritorious

Mr. CLINGMAN. I beg leave to call the at- | although they actually served from the time they ihan the soldier who has periled his life on the tention of the committee, for a moment, to the pro- left home, and were recognized as being accepted battle-field. If the committee think otherwise, I visions of the law, which I wish to make applica- into the company until they were discharged at hope they will vote down my amendment. I hope ble to one company-a company who enlisted for Sandusky, from twenty-four, twenty-five, and it will be made a test here, and before our constitthe Mexican war as volunteers. They were taken twenty six, and in one case twenty-nine days. iuents, whether those who have really fought the from my district down to Fort Moultrie, and when know men in that region of country who were in battle, whether those who came on shore and susthey arrived there, the Government did not sup-battle-volunteers—who ran risks and hazards tained the brunt of action when others were runpose

that it was necessary to send them to Mexico, much more than those even who will draw one ning away, shall also have their reward; or whether but they were kept for about twelve months at that hundred and sixty acres. This amendment recog- | the undeserving and unmeritorious only, who ran point and discharged. They were placed in a cli- nizes the smallesi grade of service, and embraces away, shall receive the bounty of this Government. mate which was as unpleasant to them as any to the principle of the law granting forty acres to Thai is the question for the committee to deter: be found in Mexico. They were extremely anx- those who were engaged to serve and were honor- | mine now. I leave that question with them, conious to go forward and serve in Mexico, but they ably discharged in the Mexican war. I might call fiding in their sense of justice. I have a high were denied that privilege, and regulars were sent the attention of gentlemen from New York, Ver- opinion of their probity, and do not believe they forward into Mexico in their stead, while they were mont, and other Eastern States, to those who will make this unjust distinction. thus obliged to take their places as a garrison. I were engaged in battles upon Lakes Champlain Mr. WALSH. I desire to say but a few words, desire simply to read the provisions of the law, and Erie, and those who left their homes at the partly in support of the amendment and partly which I think the committee will see is clearly ap- first intelligence of hostilities, and marched to the against it. plicable to this case, and ought to be held by the battle-fields of Plattsburg, Chippeway, and Lun- The CHAIRMAN. The Chair will inform the Department, to include them now:

dy's Lane, and who did service in other short | gentleman that he can say what he desires to say And be it further enacted, That the officers, non-commis- campaigns. All I ask is, to vote for a provision against the amendment, but not that in favor of it. sioned officers, musicians and privates engaged in the mili- which will bring that class of men in the same Mr. WALSH. I understand that I have a tary service of the United States, in the war with Mexico, footing upon which you have placed the soldiers right, under the five minutes rule, to speak against and who served out the time of their engagement, or may have been honorably discharged, &c., shall be entitled to who have served in the other wars; and I believe il the amendment, and I oppose

it for the reason that receive three months' extra pay, provided this provison of this House will sanction that principle.

I do not suppose it embraces Barney's fotilla men. the 5th section shall only apply to those who have been in Mr. BELL demanded tellers upon his amend- I should like to have them described by the proper actual service during the war.

ment; which were not ordered. Now, the Secretary of War has decided that The question was then taken, and decided in Mr. EVANS. What is it? those troops who did not get into Mexico are not the negative.

Mr. WALSH. They were seamen, and die to receive the bounty. No one will pretend that So the amendment was rejected.

fact that they were seamen constitutes their claim all troops engaged in Mexico were in actual bat- Mr. EVANS. I propose the following amend- for compensation at the hands of this House ! tle. A great many of them had no opportunity ment as an additional section:

will give you their history briefly. Commodore of engaging with the enemy. The only limitation

And be it further enacted, That one hundred and sixty Barney came into the city of Balúmore and vicinis, that they shall have been in the service of the acres of land be, and the same are hereby granted to every ity, and got sailors from the mercantile marine. United States during the war with Mexico. Sup

officer and soldier, whether of regulars, inilitia, or voluni-
teers, who may have been actually engaged in any action

He put them on board of gun boats, and as the pose Mexico had brought an armament to Fort

or encounter with the enemy, in any of the wars specified enemy advanced he destroyed those boats to preMoultrie, as Great Britain did during the war of in the act approved September 28, 1850, without regard to vent their falling into the hands of the British fleet.

name.

Those men were then entitled to their discharge, kept upon the frontier one, two, three, or four “Be it resolved." I offered an amendment with and nine men out of ten would have fled from the months in active service of the most arduous de- the form of "And be it further enacted." Now, danger, but not so with them. They volunteered scription.

I do not care which is adopted, but for the sake of under their immortal leader, came to Bladensburg, The question now being upon striking out and uniformity, I want to have the form settled, and and the British record of that battle says that the inserting, it was put, and there were-ayes 38, either mine changed to conform with the bill, or valor and gallantry evinced by these sailors and noes 30-no quorum voting.

the bill changed to conform with mine. the marines was never exceeded upon the field of (Cries of " Tellers !" " Tellers !” and “Call the Mr. JONES, of Tennessee. I make a question battle. I wish I had the book here to show you roll!'']

of order upon that amendment. The question what the British historian says of them.

Tellers were ordered; and Messrs. CartTER and which the gentleman from Maryland (Mr. Evans) Sir, these men were engaged in the general de- CLEVELAND were appointed.

raises is one which has never been settled. The fence; they were not acting on the battle field, The question was then taken, and the tellers Committee of the Whole on the state of the in defense of their own firesides; they were not reported—ayes 47, noes 63-no quorum.

Union has had a joint resolution under considerarushing to the protection of their own homes, for (Loud cries of "Call the roll!'']

tion, and they report it back to the House, having they scarcely had homes; but they came here to l'he Clerk then proceeded to call the roll, and first adopted the amendment of the gentleman from defend your capital, and in that point of view, the absentees having been noted, the committee Georgia, (Mr. STEPHENS,) to change it from a were engaged in the general defence.

rose, and the Speaker having resumed the chair, ll joint resolution to an act. Before the House acted Justice requires the grafting of exceptions on all the Chairman (Mr. Olds] reported that the Com- upon that amendment, it was referred to a select general rules and general laws. This case consti- || mittee of the Whole on the state of the Union committee, who reported back a substitute for it tutes such an exception, and we have acted on having found itself without a quorum, had directed as a joint resolution. The House has, therefore, this principle in the case of the pensions granted the roll to be called and the absentees noted, and never decided whether it should be a joint resoluto the seamen who were entitled to pensions had instructed him to report the facts to the House tion or an act. under the law relative to the Mexican war. We with the names of the absentees.

Mr. EVANS. I ask the permission of the comhave singled out those men to bestow our bener

A quorum now being present, the committee mittee to strike out of my amendment the words olence upon them; and here is a case of men who again resumed its session.

“ Be it resolved," and to insert “ Be it enacted." left their native element, came on land, and put The tellers again resumed their places, and the There being no objection, it was so ordered. themselves under the control of a military com- question being taken, they reported—ayes 62, Mr. MARSHALL, of Kentucky. I move mander-men who, the British historian tells you, noes 58.

that the committee do now rise, and report the managed their guns with a skill and success un- So the amendment was agreed to.

bill. exampled in European war.

Mr. JONES, of Tennessee. I am satisfied that

Mr. SACKETT. I desire to offer an amendSir, I have a word now to say, with the permis- we cannot do anything by remaining here, and I

ment. sion of the House, for the purpose of correcting move that the committee do now rise.

Mr. MARSHALL. The bill has been read history. It is said that the Maryland troops ran Mr. MARSHALL, of Kentucky. I hope the through, and acted upon by sections; now I ask from the field of Bladensburg. Sir, they ran only committee will not rise now. There is but one

if it is not competent for the committee to rise, and when no other troops could have stood. They more section of the bill, and I hope we shall first

report the bill? We have gone through the bill, ran only when their ammunition was exhausted. | dispose of it.

and if gentlemen are allowed still to offer amendI call the attention of the House to that same Mr. DUNHAM. I move to strike out the fifth

ments, the opponents of the bill may prevent the British record, which says that the fifth regiment section of the bill under consideration, and insert

bill from ever being brought to a vote. of Maryland militia drove back the first advances the seventh section of the bill reported by the The CHAIRMÅN. The Chair supposes it is of the British army, and these were raw militia, select committee. I would suggest that the subwho had scarcely got upon the field of fight before stance of that section has already been adopted, || the bill to amend them, but it is competent to

not competent to return to any of the sections of the fight began. and the section will of course be stricken out. I

amend by adding additional sections. The question was then taken on Mr. Evans's move to insert the whole of the seventh section of

Mr. SÅCKETT. I desire to offer an additional amendment, and on a division there were-ayes 46, || the bill of the select committee, with an amend section to the bill. noes 17-no quorum voting. ment which I have added.

Mr. WALSH. I submit this question of orTellers were accordingly ordered, and Messrs. The fifth section proposed to be stricken out is der. Until the question is put upon the motion of HAMILTON and Chandler appointed. And the as follows, viz:

the gentleman from Kentucky (Mr. MARSHALL) question being again put, there were-ayes 78, “Sec. 5. And be it further resolved, That in all cases

that the committee rise, the gentleman from New noes 44.

where the militia or volunteers, or State troops were called So the amendment was agreed to. out under the laws or executive authority of any State, and

York (Mr. SACKETT) cannot get the floor to offer who served in defence of the country, and whose services

his amendment. The Clerk then reported the fourth section, as have been recognized and paid by the United States Gov. The CHAIRMAN, The Chair decides that follows:

ernment, shall be considered as having been in the service Sec. 4. And be it further resolved, That nothing in of the United States, and shall be entitled to the benefit of

so long as gentlemen desire to offer amendments the first section of the act of the twenty-eighth of Septemthe act of which these resolutions are explanatory."

which are in order, it is not competent, under the ber, eighteen hundred and fifty, granting bounty land to cer- That proposed to be inserted by Mr. Dunham | rules, for the committee to rise and report the tain officers and soldiers who have been engaged in the mili- is as follows, viz:

bill. tary service of the United States, shall be so construed as to exclude any commissioned or non-commissioned officer,

And be it further enacted, That the proviso to the sec

Mr. MARSHALL. Do I understand the Chair ond section of the act of which this act is explanatory be

to decide that after the bill has been read through, musician, or private, whether of regulars, volunteers, rangers, or militia, who was mustered into the service of the and the same is hereby repealed.

so long as gentlemen may choose to offer amendUnited States for the suppression or prevention of Indian The question was then taken, and the amend- | ments, it is not competent for the committee to rise hostilities, and served the length of time required by said ment was not agreed to.

and report the bill? act, or whose services were subsequently recognized by the Mr. HUNTER. I I move to strike out the fifth The CHAIRMAN. The Chair decides that, United States. section of the bill.

under the rules, it is not competent for the commitMr. DUNHAM. The committee, in adopting the fifth section of the Senate bill, have already || agreed to.

The question was taken, and the motion was tee to rise and report the bill so long as gentlemen

desire to offer amendments which are in order. adopted the substance of this section, and there is

Mr. MOORE, of Pennsylvania. I move the But it is not in order to return to any sections of therefore no necessity for keeping it in. following as an additional section:

the bill to amend them. I move to strike out the fourth section, and insert in lieu thereof the fourth section of the bill

Mr. JONES, of Tennessee. I understand that And be it further provided, That every male citizen of

the United States of twenty-one years of age, or upwards, it is in order to offer a proviso to the last section, reported from the select committee, with a provi- who has served his country by paying its taxes and attend- or an additional section. so thereto which I have added, and which I send ing to those peaceable pursuits of life which have placed it to the Clerk's desk. in a position second to none in the world, shall be entitled

The CHAIRMAN. It is in order to offer an The Clerk read the matter proposed to be in

to enter upon and take any one quarter section of the public additional section to the bill.

lands which may be open to entry at private sale, for the Mr. DUNHAM. I would inquire if the Chair serted, as follows:

purpose of residence and cultivation, and that when such SEC. 4. And be it further enacted, That in computing citizen shall have resided on the same land for three years,

decides that an amendment may be offered when the term of service of the officers and soldiers of militia, and cultivated the same, or if dying in the meantime, the

a mution has been made to rise and report the

bill? volunteers, and rangers, for the purposes of this act, or of

residence and cultivation shall be held and carried on by his the act of which this act is explanatory, such term shall be

widow or his beirs, or devisees for the space of full three The CHAIRMAN. It is not competent to encomputed from the time they were mustered into the ser

years from and after making entry of such land, then a patvice of and paid by the United States to the time they were ent to issue for the same to the person making entry, or

tertain a motion to rise and report, as long as gendischarged therefrom: Provided, That this section sball otherwise to his heirs or devisees, as the case may require:

tlemen choose to offer amendments which are in

order. not extend to the cases provided for in the second section,

Provided nevertheless, That such person so entering and and in the provisos to the first section of the act of which

taking the quarter section as aforesaid, shall not have, nor Mr. DUNHAM. In this instance the motion this act is explanatory. shall his devisees or heirs have, any power to alienate such

to rise was made first. land nor create any title thereto in law or equity, by deed, Mr. DUNHAM. I will explain to the com- transfer, lease, or any other conveyance except by devise by

The CHAIRMAN. The Chair supposes that mittee the purport of the section which I propose

such a motion does not change the order of busito insert in lieu of the fourth section. It is simply The CHAIRMAN. The Chair decides that ness at all, and gentlemen have still a right to offer to provide that in computing the time of service of the amendment is not in order.

amendments in order. the soldiers, it shall be computed from the time Mr. MARSHALL, of Kentucky. I move that Mr. SACKETT then offered the following they were first engaged in service until they were the committee do now rise, and report the bill. amendment as an additional section, which was discharged; in other words, that you shall com- Mr. EVANS. I rise to a point of order. read: pute the full term that they were in active service. want to put this bill right. When this matter was And be it further enacted, That the word " children,"

The proviso is designed to obviate the difficulty first introduced into the House, it was introduced whenever it occurs in this act, shall be construed to mean in reference to that section, suggested by my col- as a joint resolution; and, on motion by the gen

descendants from the soldier. league (Mr. Fitch) a few days ago. It is simply tleman from Georgia, it was changed into an en- The CHAIRMAN. The Chair hardly supto meet the case where soldiers who had been actment, and the word “resolved" stricken out. poses that amendment in order. It is merely excalled out in Indian wars and for the suppression It was then referred to a select committee who

planatory of the act itself. of Indian hostilities were, after peace was made," reported back a substitute for it, with the form of Mr. SACKETT. If I could have the attention

will.

to the same.

ent.

of the committee for a few moments, they will being bounty land to certain officers and soldiers who have of Pennsylvania, petitioning Congress to pass a law to proable to see the propriety of it.

been engaged in the military service of the United States," hibit absolutely the deportation, banishment, or immigra. The CHAIRMÁN.' The Chair decides it out

approved september 28, 1850, and shall receive lands for tion from foreign countries of all convicts, felons, and pan.

their services according to the provisions of said act, upon of order.

pers, publicly recognized as such. proof of length of service as therein required; and that the By Mr. KUHNS: The memorial of Benjamin WakeMr. SACKETT. I can satisfy the chairman last proviso of the ninth section of the act of 11th of Feb- field, praying to be allowed the difference of pay between that the amendment is in order, if I can have his

ruary, 1847, be and the same is hereby repealed : Provided, that of master's mate and boatswain while periorming the

That nothing herein contained shall authorize bounty land attention.

duties of the latter grade on board the United States ship to those who have heretofore received or become entitled Preble. The CHAIRMAN. The question is not de

By Mr. ALLISON: Two petitions signed by Anthony batable.

Sec. 5. And be it further engcted, That one hundred and Henderson and 152 others, citizens of Lawrence county, Mr. HOWARD. I desire to offer a proviso to sixty acres of land be, and the same are hereby, granted to Pennsylvania, for a grant of land to be made to the State of

every officer and soldier, whether of regulars, militia, or the last section of the bill.

Pennsylvania, for the purpose of aiding the Pittsburg and volunteers, who may have been actually engaged in any ac- Erie Railroad Company in the construction of their road. The proviso was then read, as follows:

tion or encounter with the enemy, in any of the wars speci- By Mr. ROBBINS: A petition signed by George AlberProvided, That nothing in the first section of the act of

fied in the act approved September 28, 1850, without regard son and 38 other citizens of the county of Philadelpliin, the twenty eighth of September, eighteen hundred and fifty,

to his length of service; or in case of the death of any such stating that the extension of the Woodworth patent had granting bounty land to certain officers and soldiers who

soldier or othcer, the warrant to be issued inay be granted to been obtained by fraud and false information, and ask that have been engaged in the military service of the United

such person or persons as would be entitled under the act a committee be appointed with power to send for persons States, shall be so construed as to exclude any commis

of 1850, above mentioned, or any other act, as if this en- and papers, with a view to inform your honornble bodier sioned or non-commissioned officer, musician, or private,

actment had constituted a part thereof: Provided, That of the truths and merits of all matters pertaining to said palwhether of regulars, volunteers, rangers, or militia, who

nothing herein contained shall be so construed as to grant ent and its several extensions. was mustered into the service of the United States for the

more than one hundred and sixty acres of land to any per- Also, the petition of P. M. Manus and 49 other citizens suppression or prevention of Indian hostilities, and served

son who may already be entitled to it under the act above of the county of Philadelphia, asking for the extension of the length of time required by said act, or whose services mentioned for his services in any one war.

the Woodworth patent by act of Congress. were subsequently recognized by the United States.

Sec. 6. And be it further enacted, That the warrants of Also, the petition signed by Levi Lancaster and 19 other

one hundred and sixty acres, so as above to be issued, shall citizens of Penn district, in the county of Philadelphia, The CHAIRMAN. Has not this amendment be assignable.

Pennsylvania, asking Congress to modify the bounty land been once offered in the committee?

SEC. 7. be it further enacted, That the act of Sep- act of September 28, 1850, so as to give to each person is Mr. GAYLORD. I would inquire if the fourth || sailors, flolilla men, and marines serving with land troops

tember 28, 1850, is hereby extended to all naval officers, tended to be benefited by said act, and the seamen and masection does not cover it?

rines who served in said wars, not less than one hundred in cases where they could not be entitled to prize money: and sixty acres of land. The CHAIRMAN, The Chair thinks this Sec. 8. And be it further enacted, That in computing By Mr. HENDRICKS: The petition of Thomas Wil proposition has been voted upon already.

the term of service of the officers and soldiers of militia, liams and W. W. Painey, of Johnson county, Indiana, Mr. HOWARD. It is a distinct proposition.

volunteers, and rangers, for the purpose of this act, or of praying that additional compensation be made to the as

the act of wbich this act is explanatory, such term shall be The CHAIRMAN. The committee have acted

sistant

marshals for services in taking the Seventh Censis. computed from the time they were mustered into the ser- By Mr. MOORE, of Pennsylvania : A remonstrance of upon a similar proposition.

vice of and paid by the United States to the time they citizens of Philadelphia against the extension of the Wood Mr. GAYLORD. There is a similar provision

were discharged therefrom: Provided, That this section worth patent. in the fourth section of the Senate bill.

shall not extend to the cases provided for in the second sec- Also, five memorials from citizens of the county of pl.

tion, and in the provisos to the first section of the act of The CHAIRMAN. The Chair is of the opin- which this act is explanatory.

adelphia in favor of the extension of the Woodworth pation that it is out of order.

The SPEAKER, The question is now upon protection to American labor and the industrial interests of

Also, memorial of citizens of Pennsylvania, asking for Mr. LANE. I desire to offer the following as

the amendments reported by the committee. an additional section to the bill,

our country, by an alteration of the present tariff system.

Mr. BRECKENRIDGE demanded the pre- Also, resolutions of the Legislature of Pennsylvania, reThe amendment was then read, as follows:

vious question, and also tellers upon that motion. ative to appropriations for piers in the Delaware river, to And be it further provided, That all persons who are en- Tellers were ordered, and Messrs. Davis of In- complete the Delaware breakwater, and for an ice haber titled to a bounty of land for services rendered, and who are

near Reedy Island. at this time residents of Oregon Territory, shall be entitled diana, and BRECKENRIDGE were appointed.

By Mr. CHANDLER: The memorial of George R. and permitted to locate their warrants upon any unclaimed

The question was then taken, and the tellers i Childs and many other citizens of Philadelphia, asking la lands in said Territory, and upon such survey and location reported—ayes 98, noes 28; so the previous ques the renewal of the patent for Woodworth's planing machine, patent shall issue therefor as in other cases. "tion received a second.

for a grant of land to aid in the construction of a railroad The CHAIRMAN. This amendment is so

Mr. GOODENOW. I move to lay the bill from Lafayette, via Peoria and Burlington, to the Missouri nearly like the one voted upon already, that it is il upon the table.

river. out of order. Mr. MARSHALL, of Kentucky. Upon that Nelson

Ferris

, assistant marshals of St. Joseph county, In

By Mr. FITCH: The petition of Eber Woolman and Mr. MARSHALL, of Kentucky. I move that I demand the yeas and nays.

diana, asking additional compensation for services in taking the committee rise and report the bill to the

Mr. HENN. Will it be in order to call for the the census. House. reading of the amendments ?

By Mr. SEYMOUR, of New York: Remonstrance of 30 The question was then taken on the motion, The SPEAKER. It will be in order.

citizens of Troy, New York, against the extension of the and it was agreed to.

Mr. CLINGMAN. I desire to make a privi

Woodworth patent.

By Mr. ALLEN, of Illinois: The petition of Jesse The committee accordingly rose, and the Speaker | leged motion, in order to enable the House to un- York and 85 other citizens of White county, and State of having resumed the chair, the chairman of the derstand what the condition of the bill is. I move Illinois, for the extension of the present nail route leading

from Benton to McLanesboro', via Carmi and Phillipstowil, committee reported that the Committee of the the House do now adjourn. Whole on the state of the Union had had the state (Cries of “No!” “ No!” “No!”]

to New Harmony, Indiana, &c.

By Mr. FAULKNER: The petition of William T. Parof the Union generally under consideration, and Mr. JOHNSON, of Arkansas. Upon that mo- cell and other citizens of Jefferson county, Virginia, praying particularly the special order of the House, joint | tion I demand tellers.

for the establishment of a post road from Charlestown to resolution No. 1, being an act " explanatory of Mr. STANTON, of Ohio, demanded the yeas

Kabletown.

Also, the petition of Lewis B. Willis, of Virginia, late a the act approved September 28, 1850, entitled and nays; which were not ordered.

paymaster in the Army of the United States, praying the An act granting bounty land to certain officers Tellers were also refused.

payment of a judgment rendered in his favor against the and soldiers who have been engaged in the mili- Mr. STUART. The House will understand United States by the district court of Louisiana.

Also, the petition of John H. King, of Harper's Ferry, tary service of the United States," and had di- this question in one moment. rected him to report the same to the House with (Cries of “Order!” “Order !")

praying to be paid for his services as a director of the ridle

factory bundry amendments thereto.

The question was then taken on the motion to Also, the petition of same, praying to be paid for certain The bill as adopted by the committee, is as fol- adjourn, and it was agreed to.

improvements of his invention used at the national & lows: So the House adjourned to to-morrow, at twelve more

By Mr. HARPER: The petition of Samuel McArthur Sec. 1. Be it enacted, &c., That from and after the paso'clock.

and 85 other citizens of Muskingum and Guernsey consage of this act, the registers and receivers of the United

ties, Ohio, praying that the law authorizing the transportaStates land offices shall each be entitled to receive fifty

NOTICE OF A BILL.

tion of the mail on Sunday may be repealed. cents for his services in locating each bounty land warrant

Also, the petition of Mary Young, of Morgan county, by him located, to be paid by the person or persons locating

Mr. CHURCHWELL gave notice that be would ask

Ohio, asking for a pension as heir of William Liggett, 8 the same; but this act shall not be so construed as to allow

leave to-morrow, or on some subsequent day, to introduce soldier of the Revolution.

a bill granting public lands to the several States of the any register or receiver to receive any greater maximum of

By Mr. DEAN: A remonstrance of C. B. Morsė, A. salary and fees than by law he is now entitled. Union for the establishment of a permanent and efficient

Wager,

and 70 other citizens of Rhinebeck, Dutchess cousSec. 2. And be it further enacted, Thatif any officer or system of common schools.

ty, New York, against the further extension of the Woodsoldier who would, it living, have been entitled io the ben

worth patent. efit of the act of Congress, passed September 28, 1850, shall

PETITIONS, &c.

By Mr. KING, of Rhode Island: The petition of Richard have died leaving no widow surviving him, the child or

The following petitions, memorials, &c., were presented buoy on the south point of Goat Island, in the harbor of

Borden and others, for the establishment of a dolphin er children of such officer or soldier shall be entitled to the benefit of said act; and if there are no children living, then

under the rule, and referred to the appropriate committees : Newport, Rhode Island. the father and mother of such officer or soldier shall be en- By Mr. HIBBARD: The petitiou of Content Hutchin- Also, the memorial of Colonel William Gates, praying titled, or in default of father or mother, the right shall de- son, praying that certain money lost in the mail may be re- for the return

to him of certain moneys presented to him by scend to the brothers and sisters of such officer or soldier in funded to him.

citizens of Tampico, on his retiring from command there, as full a manner as though said soldier or officer had him- By Mr. FLORENCE : The memorial of Isaac Weaver, and paid by him into the Treasury of the United States sell received the bounty, any act to the contrary notwith- James McCann, Enoch Thorn, and others, citizens of the By Mr. PHELPS: The petition of citizens of Taney standing.

city and county of Philadelphia, remonstrating against the county, Missouri, for a post road from Forsythe, via Big Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That in the event of extension of the Woodworth patent for planing boards, &c. Beaver Creek, to Hartville, Wright county, the death of a commissioned or non-commissioned officer, Also, the memorial of Michael Wartinan & 00., E. & A. Also, the petition of citizens of Wright county, Missouri, musician, or private, who shall have made application for Kern, George Fites, P. George Warrington, C.D. James, for the relief of Littleton Freeman. bounty land under the provisions of said act, during the Charles S. Close, Daniel Kane, Henry M. Weaver, G. S. Also, the petition

of citizens of Lawrence and Greene pendency of such application, any warrant issued in the Hendrickson, and more than 800 others, cigar-makers, and countics, Missouri, for a post road from Monnt Vernon, via name of any such deceased applicant, such warrant so is- residents of the city and county of Philadelphia, represent- Dunkle's store, to Orleans, Polk county, sued shall not become void, but shall inure to and for the ing that in consequence of the existing tariff regulations and By Mr. RIDDLE: Thé .memorial of certain citizens, benefit of those entitled thereto, the same as if such officer the frauds practiced under the law, they are subjected to cigar-makers in the city of Wilmington, State of Delaware, or soldier had been deceased at the passage of said act. ruinous competition with foreign cigars, especially those praying Congress to make such an alteration of the tariffen

Sec. 4. And be it further enacted, That in all cases made in the German States, and praying for an alteration cigars of a less valuation than $10 per thousand, as will where the militia or volunteers or State troops of any State of the tariff on cigars of a less valuation than $10 per afford them employment at fair remunerating prices, or Territory were called into military service, and whose thousand, so as to afford employment for American work- Also, resolutions of the

General Assembly of the State of services have been paid by the United States, the ofñcers men at fair and remunerating prices.

Delaware, in reference to public lands. and soldiers of such militia, volunteers, or troops, shall be Alsn, the memorial of Joseph Ritchie, John C. Mont- By Mr. 'HASCALL: The petition of Ennice Gilbert

, for entitled to all the benefits of the act entitled "An act grant- gomery, Benjamin Orne, and others, citizens of the State compensation for property destroyed in the war of 1812.

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