Arboretum Et Fruticetum Britannicum: Or, The Trees and Shrubs of Britain, Native and Foreign, Hardy and Half-hardy, Pictorially and Botanically Delineated, and Scientifically and Popularly Described; with Their Propagation, Culture, Management, and Uses in the Arts, in Useful and Ornamental Plantations, and in Landscape Gardening; Preceded by a Historical and Geographical Outline of the Trees and Shrubs of Temperate Climates Throughout the World, Volumen2

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Página 900 - He then pledges him in a curious toast : the company follow his example with all the other oxen, addressing each by his name. This being finished, the large cake is produced, and, with much ceremony, put on the horn of the first ox, through the hole above-mentioned.
Página 876 - Indians for making arrows and pipe stems ; and it is thence termed by the Canadian voyagers Bois de fleche. Its berries, which are about the size of a pea, are the finest fruit in the country ; and are used by the Cree Indians both in a fresh and in a dried state. They " make excellent puddings, very little inferior to plum-pudding.
Página 699 - Nasus, chief of the Hussites, was so touched with this spectacle, that he received the young supplicants, regaled them with cherries and other fruits, and promised them to spare the city. The children returned crowned with leaves, holding cherries, and crying...
Página 786 - ... stems. *= ^ =* #= But in this delicious garden of Negaaristan, the eye and the smell are not the only senses regaled by the presence of the Rose. The ear is enchanted by the wild and beautiful notes of multitudes of nightingales, whose warblings seem to increase in melody and softness with the unfolding of their favorite flowers. Here, indeed, the stranger is more powerfully reminded that he is in the genuine country of the nightingale and the Rose.
Página 905 - Whether the fall of his house gives the tenant warning to quit, I cannot say, but quit he does, and that almost immediately. He leaves the core, crawls along his breathing and clearing-out gallery, the mouth of which, before nearly closed, he now gnaws into a smooth round hole, which will permit him free passage, without hurting his fat, soft, round body; then out he comes, and, for the first time in his life finds ,himself in the open air. He now wanders about on the ground till he finds the stem...
Página 757 - England, by Master Nicholas Lete, a worthy merchant of London, and a great lover of flowers, from Constantinople, which (as we hear) was first brought thither from Syria, but perished quickly both with him. and with all other to whom he imparted it; yet afterward it was sent to Master John de Frangueville.
Página 962 - Right in the middest of that Paradise There stood a stately mount, on whose round top A gloomy grove of...
Página 838 - Where the great Sun begins his state Robed in flames and amber light, The clouds in thousand liveries dight; While the ploughman, near at hand, Whistles o'er the furrowed land, And the milkmaid singeth blithe, And the mower whets his scythe, And every shepherd tells his tale Under the hawthorn in the dale.
Página 786 - I was struck with the appearance of two rose-trees, full fourteen feet high, laden with thousands of flowers, in every degree of expansion, and of a bloom and delicacy of scent that imbued the whole atmosphere with the most exquisite perfume.
Página 839 - How often have I paused on every charm, The sheltered cot, the cultivated farm, The never-failing brook, the busy mill, The decent church that topt the neighbouring hill, The hawthorn bush, with seats beneath the shade, For talking age and whispering lovers made...

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