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were disabled and abandoned, and the men retired to Morristown. After the siege of Knoxville, the battery was ordered to recross the Cumberland Mountains and report at Camp Nelson. It was afterward engaged in various duties in Kentucky and Tennessee, until April 25, 1865, when it was mustered out.

Battery M achieved an enviable reputation for skill and gallantry, and received the praise of its commanding Generals. General Burnside was accustomed to speak of the men as “those boys who went through the knot-holes of Kentucky.”

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COMPLETE NUMERICAL LIST OF CASUALTIES BY REGIMENTS IN ARTILLERY, CAVALRY AND

INFANTRY-TOTAL NUMBER OF DEATHS TWENTY-EIGHT THOUSAND Eight HUNDRED AND FORTY-TWO.

O

T HE Bureau of the Provost Marshal General in Washington has

1 been busily engaged since the close of the rebellion in collating the vast statistics and other materials of immeasurable historic and scientific value, gathered under its auspices in the various loyal States during the progress of the war, with a view to its preservation in some permanent form for future instruction and guidance. With its net-work of organization, extending into every part of the country, no branch of the Government enjoyed greater facilities for collecting accurately such facts and figures pertaining to the history of the war as relate to its operations, and as are worth preserving.

Under the orders of Provost Marshal General Fry the Assistant Provost Marshals General in the several States, have succeeded in compiling complete and correct tables of the casualties from the beginning to the close of the war in all the organizations of all the States represented in the loyal armies. The subjoined table, showing the casualties in every regiment of cavalry and infantry, and every battery of artillery raised in Illinois for the war, from April, 1861, to April, 1865, was prepared under the direction of Brevet Brigadier-General Oakes, U. S. A., Assistant Provost Marshal General for Illinois, from the records of the Adjutant General's Office in Springfield, and afterward corrected from the rolls in the Adjutant General's Office in Washington. It is as nearly complete and correct as it can be made.

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2

A variety of highly interesting and instructive facts can be deduced from the table. As is known, Illinois furnished for the war, under all the calls, two hundred and fifty-eight thousand, two hundred and seventeen men, the numbers reduced to a three years' standard, two hundred and twelve thousand six hundred and ninety-four men. Of these, as shown below, twenty-eight thousand six hundred and forty-two were killed in battle or died of wounds and disease while in service, amounting to more than seven per cent.

The total casualties in the cavalry and artillery were comparatively much greater than in the infantry. In the cavalry they were nearly twenty;, in the artillery about the same proportion; while in the infantry, only about fifteen per cent.

In the cavalry the proportion of deaths in battle and of wounds to deaths from disease, was nearly as one to seven; in the artillery, as one to four, and in the infantry, as one to two. This proves that the cavalry was much more exposed to hardships than the other arms. In the cavalry, the proportion of the killed outright to the wounded is about as two to one; in the artillery, as three to one; in the infantry, as two to one. Of the killed in battle, there was in the cavalry one officer to every sixteen enlisted men; in the artillery one to every seventeen, and in the infantry, one to every fourteen. Of those died of wounds, there was in the cavalry one officer to every thirty-five enlisted men; in the artillery, one to every twentyone, and in the infantry, one to every twenty-three. Of those died of disease, there was in the cavalry one officer to every fifty-three enlisted men; in the artillery, one to every seventy-one, and in the infantry, one to every fifty-three. The relatively smaller number of deaths of officers by disease than in battle and by wounds, shows the effect of the greater physical comfort they enjoyed than the rank and file. In the cavalry, the 7th and 8th regiments lost the greatest number killed in action; the 12th and 18th the greatest number died of wounds, and the 5th and 13th the greatest number died of disease.

Of the artillery, the 1st regiment lost the greatest number killed in action and died of wounds; the 2d, the greatest number died of disease.

Of the infantry, the 9th and 36th regiments lost the greatest number killed outright; the 36th and 39th the greatest number died of wounds, and the 40th and 131st the greatest number of deaths from disease.

The largest total of deaths in the cavalry was in the 13th regiment, ( 376 ); in the artillery, the 1st, (292), and in the infantry, the 11th, (425).

The following is a detailed table of the losses in the infantry, cavalry and artillery, by regiments :

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