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which were found two cart-loads of large size revolvers loaded and capped, 200 stand of loaded muskets and ammunition. Also seized two boxes of guns concealed in a room in the city. Also arrested Buck Morris, Treasurer of the Sons of Liberty, having complete proof of his assisting Shanks to escape, and plotting to release prisoners at this camp.

"Most of these rebel officers were in the city on the same errand in August last, their plan being to raise an insurrection and release the prisoners of war at this camp. There are many strangers and suspicious persons in the city, believed to be guerrillas and rebel soldiers. Their plan was to attack the camp on election-night. All prisoners arrested are in camp. Captain Nelson and A. C. Coventry, of the police, rendered very efficient service.

“B. J. Sweet, Colonel Commanding." "CAMP DOUGLAs, Nov. 7th, 4 A. M.”

The city was horrified, and none knew certainly that the storm would not yet burst. Husbands and fathers. shuddered at the thought of the city given up to the brutal control of that mob of eight thousand rebel prisoners and their more brutal allies! · Never were so many citizens armed in Chicago as that day. Patrols rode to and fro, and the city wore the appearance of a military camp. The election progressed peacefully, additional arrests were made, and arms seized, but the life was gone, and the conspiracy collapsed.

“Early in January, 1865, pursuant to the order of Major-General Joseph Hooker, commander of the Northwestern Department, and the Department of the Ohio, a military commission assembled in Cincinnati--the headquarters of the military department-to try by court martial, the alleged ringleaders in the conspiracy. After one or two informal meetings, the Court formally assembled January 9th, being constituted as follows: Colonel Charles T. Murray, 89th Indiana, President; Colonel M. M. Wisewell, 6th V. R. C. ; Colonel R. Spooner, 83d Indiana; Colonel R. H. DeHart, 138th Indiana ; Lieutenant-Colonel P. Van Radowitz, A. D. C., U. S. A.; Lieutenant-Colonel S. H. Lathrop, A. I. G., U. S. V.; Lieutenant-Colonel Allen Heath, 100th Indiana, and Major S. R. Lee, 6th V. R. C. The Judge Advocate of the Court was Colonel H. S. Burnett, assisted by Colonel J. R. Jackson. Benn Pittman, Esq., acted as recorder. On the 18th of January the prisoners were arraigned upon the following charges, with suitable specifications:

Charge First Conspiring in violation of the laws of war, to

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release the rebel prisoners confined by authority of the United States, at Camp Douglas, near Chicago, Illinois.'

Charge Sccond-- Conspiring in violation of the laws of war, to lay waste and destroy the city of Chicago, Illinois.'

66 The prisoners thus charged were Buckner S. Morris, of Chicago; Charles Walsh, Chicago; Colonel George St. Leger Grenfell, C. S. A., of London, England; Colonel Vincent Marmaduke, C. S. A., Saline County, Missouri; Raphael S. Semmes, Chicago; Charles Travis, alias Charles Daniels, alias Charles Travis Daniels, of Missouri ; Benjamin Anderson, St. Louis, Missouri; George Cantrill, Scott County, Kentucky. Of these, the prisoner Cantrill was granted a separate trial, on the ground of his manifest sickness. The others first attempted to gain separate trials, but failed; then with equal unsuccess, appealed from the jurisdiction of the tribunal ; and finally, after wasting much time in useless pleas, entered a plea of 'not guilty' to the charges and specifications. Of the evidence adduced, nothing need be recapitulated, the testimony being still fresh in the memories of all our readers.

“ The trial slowly progressed until about the middle of April, when the cases for the Government and the defendants were alike concluded, and the sealed findings of the Court transmitted to the commanding general for approval. They were approved without exception, and were to the following effect: Charles Walsh, BrigadierGeneral of the Sons of Liberty--guilty, and sentenced to three years' imprisonment with hard labor in the Ohio State Penitentiary. Buckner S. Morris--not guilty. Vincent Marmaduke--not guilty. G. St. Leger Grenfell-guilty of both charges and specifications, and sentenced to the extremest penalty---death. Raphael S. Semmes --guilty, and sentenced to two years' imprisonment. The prisoner Anderson, on the 19th of February, committed suicide by shooting himself while confined in McLean Barracks; and on the 16th of the same month, Travis alias Daniels, escaped from the custody of a careless guard, during a momentary recess of the court, in the Court House.

« The above sentences were none of them carried into effect, and on the glorious victories of the Federal armies, annihilating the rebellion, the convicted Chicago conspirators, with other military pris

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oners, received the benefit of executive clemency. The sentence of Grenfell was commuted from death to imprisonment for life in the Dry Tortugas, and the other convicts were pardoned and allowed to return to their homes, after an absence and confinement in durance vile of nearly nine months." .

So ended the conspiracy trials, and the punishment of the conspirators. Perhaps it was well that executive clemency was extended, but no pardon could remove the withering disgrace which had come upon the conspirators. They were free to go or come, but they were none the less outlaws. The Northern conspirators in behalf of rebellion, slavery, prisoner-starvation and assassination, must forever wear the brand of infamy.

CHAPTER XXXI.

GENERAL GRANT.

FORMER ESTIMATE-HIS WESTERN CAREER-ARMY OF POTOMAC-ITS LEADERS-MCCLELLAN--POPE BURNSIDE-HOOKER-MEADE-GRANT'S PLANS-LEE'S PRESTIGE-WILDERNESS-PETERSBURG-RESULTS--CRITICISM-PEOPLE'S ANSWER--GRANT IN CHICA60-RECEPTION IN BRYAN HALL_HOOKER'S SPEECH-GRANT'S--YATES-SHERMAN AND GRANT AS ORATORS-RECEPTION BY BOARD OF TRADE--FAIRCHILD AND WASHBURN--SECOND VISIT-OVATION IN CANADA AND MICHIGAN-EN-ROUTE FOR GALENA

MARSHAL JONES—THE TRAIN-ON THE WAY~THE GENERAL AT HOME-WELCOME BY HON. E. B. WASHBURN-GRANT-VINCENT-GRADE OF GENERAL.

TN the resume of General Grant's character and services in the

I first volume it was intimated that time was to test the sagacity of his great plans, the wisdom of his strategy, and the power of his endurance. Time has proven. The analysis of his character given in advance of his consummated victories was not inaccurate, and General Grant has taken his place among the great Captains of the world. As our fellow-citizen his final services demand special recognition in this volume.

His commands in the West have been traced from Cairo to Missionary Ridge, and an outline has been given of his service in the Army of the Potomac. That gallant army had fought bravely as ever men fought, but some strange fatality seemed to have rested upon it. The country had been impatient. Our leaders sought Richmond; the rebel leaders sought Washington. The failure of ours was subject of indignant comment, and the army of Lee was surrounded by a haze of invincibility. It had failed to reach its objective point, but yet the press spoke of it as though accomplish

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