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a large number of men. At the conclusion of the disastrous Red River campaign, the 12th returned to New Orleans, and was almost immediately ordered to do picket duty on the Lafourche, from Donaldsonville to Thibodeaux, Louisiana, continuing on this line during the summer. In the early part of September, the regiment was ordered to report to General Lee, commanding the cavalry division, at Baton Rouge, where it was actively employed in scouting and picket duty. In the early part of November, 1864, the 12th (then brigaded with the 2d Illinois cavalry, the brigade commanded by Colonel Davis) and the other cavalry regiments, under General A. L. Lee, made an expedition to Liberty, Mississippi, where they had a severe action, driving the enemy and capturing a number of prisoners, cannon and small arms. Lieutenant-Colonel Dox, in charge of the outposts, repulsed several attacks of the enemy. Subsequently the regiment participated in General Davidson's expedition against Mobile, returned to Baton Rouge, and on the 7th of January, 1865, went up the river to Memphis, joining General Osband's division. In the latter part of January, with the other regiments of the division, it made a raid through Southeastern Arkansas, returning to Memphis, and did scouting and picket duty in the vicinity, until June, 1865, when it was ordered to join General Custar’s cavalry division at Alexandria, Louisiana. From there it marched with the division to Hempstead, Texas, at which place it remained until some time in September, when it marched to Houston, reporting to Major-General Mower, commanding the eastern district of Texas. From this time to the final mustering out, the regiment, distributed in detachments through the district, was actively employed in guard and escort duty, maintaining the United States' authorities, and protecting the Union men and freedmen.

While at Memphis, “ in pursuance of Circular No. 36, paragraph three, section two, from War Department, A. G. O., of 1864, the 12th Illinois cavalry was consolidated into an eight company organization; and the 4th Illinois cavalry, having previously been consolidated into a battalion of five companies, was, in compliance with instructions received from the War Department, transferred to and consolidated with the 12th Illinois cavalry. The organization to bear the designation of the latter regiment."

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The regiment was finally mustered out of the United States' service at Houston, Texas, on the 29th of May, 1866, and ordered to proceed to Camp Butler, Springfield, for payment and discharge. It left, Houston on the 2d of June, and arrived at Springfield on the 14th, and was paid off on the 18th-the last regiment from our state to return home.

The following is the muster-out roster of the regiment:

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Colonel, Hamilton B. Dox; Lieutenant-Colonel, Andrew H. Langholz, Major, Anthony T. Search ; Adjutant, William Crookes; Quartermaster, Asher B. Hall; Surgeon, Asa Morgan ; 1st Assistant Surgeon, Ralph D. Parsons; Commissary, Henry M. Stahl. .

Co. A-Captain, Isaac Conroe ; 1st Lieutenant, Joseph A. Addington ; 2d Lieutenant Frank G. Miller.

Co. B-Captain, Henry Lossburg; 1st Lieutenant, Edwin Kolkow; 2d Lieutenant, Oscar Charles.

Co. C-Captain, William H. Redman ; 1st Lieutenant, George R. Stowe ; 2d Lieutenant, Frank Meacham.

Co. D-Captain, John J. DeLacey ; 1st Lieutenant, Patrick Mahar; 2d Lieutenant, Robert Canfield.

Co. E-Captain, Edson H. Pratt; Ist Lieutenant, Solomon P. Emden ; 2d Lieutenant, William H. Estep.

Co. F-Captain, Edmund Luff; 1st Lieutenant, Charles L. Amet; 2d Lieutenant, Allen C. Hartwell.

Co. G-Captain, Abraham Donica; 1st Lieutenant, Henry Martin; 2d Lieutenant, David W. White.

Co. H-Captain, Robert Gray; 1st Lieutenant, Jesse C. Rodgers; 2d Lieutenant, Henry Richardson.

Co. -Captain, Edward Mann; 1st Lieutenant, Andrew J. Norton; 2d Lieutenant, James E. Sterling.

Co. K-Captain, William D. Wardlow; 1st Lieutenant, Benjamin J. Arnold; 2d Lieutenant, Cornelius W. Sparkes.

Co. L-Captain, John F. Wallace ; 1st Lieutenant; Sacia F. Taylor ; 2d Lieutenant, Edwin E. English.

Co. M-Captain, Charles H. Bussum ; 1st Lieutenant, John Few; 2d Lieutenant, Frederick Walker.

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General Hasbrouck Davis was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, April 23, 1827. His father, Hon. John Davis, was United States Senator and Governor of Massachusetts. Young Davis came to Chicago in 1855, and commenced the practice of law, and had very fair success till the war broke out, when he joined with Colonel Voss in raising the 12th Illinois cavalry, closed his law office and left for

BREVET BRIGADIER-GENERAL DAVIS.

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the seat of war as Lieutenant-Colonel of the regiment. He remained in service till August, 1865, when he resigned as Brevet BrigadierGeneral. He made an honorable record for bravery and sagacity, for courage and unflinching constancy to the country. .

He is now one of the Editors of the Chicago Evening Post, an evening paper of this city, is a suecessful journalist, and sustains with his pen the policy for which he fought with his sword.

Thus in our country the citizen becomes the soldier, and the soldier is merged in the citizen. War calls up an army line a million strong, while peace finds so many accessions to her sons of toil !

General Hamilton Bogart Dox, was born in Albany, New York, April 28, 1827. He resided there until 1848, when he removed to Buffalo, New York, where he remained till 1854, and then took up his residence in Chicago. Here he was Cashier of the Exchange Bank of H. A. Tucker & Co., until 1860, when he was appointed Cashier of the Bank of Milwaukee. He returned the same year to Chicago, to take the cashiership of the Marine Bank. In the fall of 1863, he was authorized to recruit three companies for the 12th cavalry, which duty he performed, and joined the regiment with a battalion, on its return home on veteran furlough, and was appointed Lieutenant-Colonel. On the resignation of Colonel Davis he was commissioned Colonel and commanded the regiment from August, 1865, until its muster out. He was subsequently brevetted a Brigadier-General for gallant and meritorious services--a promotion he richly deserved.

CHAPTER XXIV.

GRANT'S ARMY_VICTORY.

GRANT'S ARMY-SIEGE OF PETERSBURG--FUTILE EFFORTS-OPENING OF SPRING_LOSSES

-GRANT'S STRATEGY-REBEL IRON-CLAD DASH-EXTENSION OF UNION LEFT-SHERI-
DAN'S COMMAND-His GREAT RAID-REACHES WHITE HOUSE-LEE'S DASH ON FORT
STEEDMAN—RECAPTURED—REBEL PRISONERS—IMPORTANT POSITION GAINED-AD-
VANCE ON THE UNION LEFT-FIFTH AND SECOND CORPS-FACE NORTHWARD-WHITE-
OAK ROAD-FIVE FORKS REACHED AND ABANDONED-SHERIDAN REINFORCED-Long-
STREET COMES TO HELP LEE'S RIGHT-AYER'S DIVISION BROKEN— GRIFFIN AND HUM-
PHREYS-THE REBEL LION AT BAY~SHERIDAN 'AGAIN AT FIVE FORKSDEVINS AND
DAVIES ENEMY CONCENTRATE ON SHERIDAN-NIGHTFALL—AYERS' DIVISION_SHERI-
DAN'S ADVANCE-FIVE FORKS AGAIN-ORDERS TO WARREN–His REMOVAL-UNION
ASSAULT_VICTORY-PETERSBURG-PARK'S ASSAULT_WRIGHT--HUMPHREYS'--GIB-
BONS TAKES GREGG AND ALEXANDER—MILES GOES TO SHERIDAN-ENEMY DRIVEN
SUTHERLAND'S DEPOT-HILL KILLED-LEE'S RIGHT WING GONE--TEN THOUSAND
LOST_DESPERATION-LEE'S TELEGRAM TO DAVIS-EXCITEMENT IN RICHMOND-WEIT-
ZELL-ENTRANCE INTO RICHMOND-" RICHMOND OURS!”_EXCITED AFRICAN—THE
COUNTRY--GRANT'S POLICY-LEE ATTEMPTS RETREAT-CHESTERFIELD--AMELIA COURT
HOUSE-SHERIDAN REACHES JETERSVILLE-Cuts DANVILLE RAILWAY-DEEP CREEK-
PAINE'S CROSS ROADS-DEATONVILLE-CROOKS--EWELL'S CORPS CAPTURED-ORD
GENERAL THEODORE REED-LEE OVER THE RIVER-HUNGER IS KING-LEE'S OFFICERS
SAY SURRENDER-BLOODY FIGHTING-GRANT DEMANDS THE SURRENDER OF LEE'S
ARMY-LEE'S ANSWER-GRANTS TERMS-SHERIDAN MISTAKEN-LEE HEADS TOWARD
LYNCHBURG-CHANGES AND COMES BETWEEN LEE AND SUPPLIES-APPOMATTOX STATION
-LEE PROPOSES DIPLOMACY ATTEMPTS TO CUT THROUH SHERIDAN'S CAVALRY-
“WHAT! INFANTRY !”_WHITE FLAG-GRANT'S ANSWER-LEE PROPOSES SURREN-
DER-CORRESPONDENCE-THE ARMY OF “NORTHERN VIRGINIA"-GRANT GOES TO
WASHINGTON-His REPORT—HIS PLANS SUCCESSFUL.

THE siege before Petersburg went slowly on. Efforts had been

I made and failed to secure the South-side Railroad, and Hancock sustained a severe assault from Lee, but repulsed it. The army of the James attempted to drive the enemy on the Williamsburg and York River railroads, but failed, though a work of considerable importance was carried, and so the army rested from any grand movement from October until the opening of the spring campaign. The army under Grant and Meade had lost from May 5, 1864, to

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