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as committed against a righteons God, and a merciful Redeemer? And have we cordially, unreservedly, unchangeably, and forever devoted ourselves to His service? If so, the blessed Spirit has subdued us to Himself. The characteristic exercises of a saving change of heart, have been experienced by us. We are born again. And no one, thus born again, who has seen and felt the evil of his own heart, the blindness of his stupid mind, and his natural aversion from the service of God, but what is ready to exclaim, in admiration of the power and freedom of the grace of God, which has made him willing to submit,-"Not 'unto us, Oh Lord, but unto thy name give glory, for thy mercy, and for thy truth's sake." Whether rude or learned, noble or ignoble, Hindoo, Hottentot, Caffre, Indian, or the civilized son of science, he will relate, essentially, the same experience, and evince the same impressions of truth upon the mind. To what other general and extensive cause, can we assign these mental exercises and transformations of character, than to the Spirit's gracious agency. He is their author, and His be all the glory and all the praise.

From the above general account, of the change of characteristic exercises in Regeneration, produced by the Spirit of God, it is obvious, that there are objects existing, and that facts have transpired, which are, in their nature, adapted to produce impressions and excitement, necessary, according to the constitution of the human mind, to rouse the will into appropriate action;---that these objects and truths are presented to, and may be apprehended through the exercise of our constitutional capacities, as rational and sensitive crcatures;--that the word of God is the great theatre where they are displayed;--that men are naturally averse from the contemplation of them, and treat them, as though they were false and illusory, being unwilling to pursucihem, as the meansof their enjoyment;and that this aversion is overcome, by the special influence of the Holy Spirit, who, in some way entirely unknown to us, but in perfect consistency with the established laws, which regulate the exercise of our capacities, gives an impressiveness to these truths and objects, excites the feelings, secures the attention, engages the affections, and so making the man willing and determined to embrace and cleave to them for ever as to realities substantial and eternal, revolutionizes his whole character and conduct, and develops in him a new life.

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as committed against a righteons God, and a merciful Redeemer? And have we cordially, unreservedly, unchangeably, and forever devoted ourselves to His service? If so, the blessed Spirit has subdued us to Ilimself. The characteristic exercises of a saving change of heart, have been experienced by us. We are born again. And no one, thus born again, who has seen and felt the evil of his own heart, the blindness of his stupid mind, and his natural aversion from the service of God, but what is ready to exclaim, in admiration of the power and freedom of the grace of God, which has made him willing to submit,-"Not 'unto us, Oh Lord, but into thy name give glory, for thy mercy, and for thy truth's sake." Whether rude or learned, noble or ignoble, ļlindoo, Ilottentot, Caffre, Indian, or the civilized son of science, he will relate, essentially, the same experience, and evince the same impressions of truth upon the mind. To what other general and extensive cause, can we assign these mental exercises and transformations of character, than to the Spirit's gracious agency. He is their author, and His be all the glory and all the praise.

From the above general account, of the change of characteristic exercises in Regeneration, produced by the Spirit of God, it is obvious, that there are objects existing, and that facts have transpired, which are, in their nature, adapted to produce impressions and excitement, necessary, according to the constitution of the human mind, to rouse the will into appropriate action;--that these objecis and truths are presented to, and may be apprehended through The exercise of our constitutional capacities, as rational and sensitive crcatures; that the word of God is the great theatre where they are displayed;--that men are naturally averse from the contemplation of them, and treat them, as though they were false and illusory, being unwilling to pursue them, as the meansof their enjoyment; and that this aver

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sion is overcome, by the special influence of the Holy Spirit, who, in some way entirely unknown to us, but in perfect consistency with the established laws, which regulate the exercise of our capacities, gives an impressiveness to these truths and objects, excites the feelings, secures the attention, engages the affections, and so making the man willing and determined to embrace and cleave to them for ever as to realities substantial and eternal, revolutionizes his whole character and conduct, and develops in him a new life.

termining character. But in all this, there is no new foundation laid in nature, by any creative act-no production of a new principle or cause of action sui generis, but simply the eliciting of constitutional susceptibilities in new exercise, and of such sort-s0 vivid, so strong, so influential, as to secure their easy and frequent repetition. It is philosophy that talks of some peculiar adaptation of created nature, that is the specific cause of those acts and exercises, which as they are strung together in series, or become habitual, we denominate dispositions. And it is, as we apprehend, an improper use of the term-one which common sense will not sustain, to designate, as a dispo. sition, a mere modification of created nature; for such according to the philosophical use of the term just noticed, it must mean. We use it commonly, to denote any particular class of acts, and exercises towards given objects as they operate on our constitutional capacities and susceptibilities, and not as efficient causes per se, lodged in the structure of the soul, or super added to its properties.

3. Neither does spiritual illumination consist in the commanication of any new faculty, or sense, or instinct, to the soul. For if so, then it follows, as in the former case, that the subject of it ceases to be a human being. We may be unable to know what they might do with it, yet we can conceive it possible that there should be creatures, whom the power of God may create, having all our senses, and

more superadded. The addition of these new senses, would constitute them creatures of a different constitutional nature from ourselves; and should we, by any exercise of divine power, become similarly endowed, we should cease to be human beings. The same things hold true, with respect to our intellectual, as well as to our sensitive nature. Say that our minds have been rendered ca pable of new, or angelic modes of thought, and we have ceased to be med. Beside, if illumination consists in per

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