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25.1-5 Visibility.-Every white light prescribed by these regulations shall be of a character as to be visible at a distance of at least 2 miles. Every colored light prescribed by these regulations shall be of such character as to be visible at a distance of at least 1 mile. The word“visible” when applied to lights shall mean visible on a dark night with clear atmosphere.

25.1–6 Approved lights.-Six months after the termination of the Unlimited National Emergency proclaimed by the President, May 27, 1941, navigation lights installed, fitted, or replaced on motorboats shall be of an approved type: Provided, That navigation lights installed, fitted, or replaced on a motorboat prior to the termination of the aforesaid period may be continued in service on said motorboat provided they are of such character, and so located, arranged, and illuminated as to comply with the requirements in this part: Provided further, That any such navigation lights temporarily removed and later placed in the position from which removed on any such motorboat shall not be considered as an installation, fitting, or replacement.

25.1–7 Running lights. -- The lights provided for in section 3 of the Act of April 25, 1940 (54 Stat. 164, 46 U. S. C. 526b), are running lights for motorboats subject to the provisions of that act in lieu of the lights prescribed, respectively, by Article 2 of the Act approved June 7, 1897 (30 Stat. 96, 33 U.S. C. 172) (covering certain harbors, rivers, and inland waters of the United States); Rule 3 of the act approved February 8, 1895, as amended (28 Stat. 645, as amended, 33 U. S. C. 252) (covering the Great Lakes and their connecting and tributary waters); and Rules 3, 5, 6, and 7 of R. S. 4233, as amended (28 Stat. 672, 33 U. S. C. 312, 314-316) (covering western rivers and the Red River of the North). These running lights are required to be carried on all motorboats when under way on navigable waters of the United States, in all weathers, from sunset to sunrise, but not on the high seas. Motorboats, when on the high seas, shall exhibit the lights prescribed by the International Rules of 1890, as amended (26 Stat. 321-325, as amended, 33 U. S. C. 71–82).

25.1-8 Running lights not in conflict with anchor lights and other lights.—The provisions of section 3 of the Act of April 25, 1940 (54 Stat. 164, 46 U. S. C. 526b), requiring running lights on motorboats are not in conflict with the provisions of the acts cited in paragraph 25.1-7, requiring anchor lights and other lights in addition to the running lights on pilot, towing, and fishing vessels. It will be observed that the penalties for violations of existing laws not in conflict with the Act of April 25, 1940 (54 Stat. 163-167, 46 U. S. C. 526-526t), remain unchanged.

WHISTLES OR OTHER SOUND-PRODUCING DEVICES

25.2–1 Where required.—(a) Motorboats shall be provided with an efficient whistle, horn, or other sound-producing mechanical device as follows:

(1) Class A. None.

(2) Class 1. Mouth-, hand-, or power-operated, capable of producing a blast of 2 seconds' or more duration and audible for a distance

(3) Class 2. Hand- or power-operated, capable of producing a blast of 2 seconds' or more duration and audible for a distance of at least 1 mile.

(4) Class 3. Power-operated, capable of producing a blast of 2 seconds' or more duration and audible for a distance of at least 1 mile.

(5) Commercial fishing motorboats may carry any device specified in this section.

(6) Whistles or other sound-producing mechanical devices which comply with the requirement in effect on April 24, 1940, may be continued in service until 6 months after the termination of the Unlimited National Emergency proclaimed by the President May 27, 1941.

25.2-2 Where not required. The provisions of sections 4 and 5 of the Act of April 25, 1940 (54 Stat. 164, 165, 46 U. S. C. 526c, 526d, 526h), requiring whistles and bells on motorboats do not apply to motorboats propelled by outboard motors while competing in any race previously arranged or announced, nor do they apply to such boats if they are designed and intended solely for racing, while they are engaged in such navigation as is incidental to the tuning up of the boats and engines for the race.

FOG BELL

25.3-1 Where required.-Motorboats shall be provided with a bell which produces, when struck, a clear bell-like tone of full round characteristics, for sounding bell signals according to class as follows:

(a1. None.

(6) Classes 2 and 3. One such bell. Part 26_Requirements for Motor Vessels Except Those of More Than 15 Gross

Tons Carrying Passengers for Hire NAVIGATION LIGHTS AND SOUND-PRODUCING DEVICES 26.1-1 Pilot rules applicable.—Motor vessels are subject to the provisions of the pilot rules regarding navigation lights, whistles, bells, and other sound-producing devices applicable to the waters navigated. Part 27—Requirements for Motorboats and Motor Vessels of More Than 15

Gross Tons Carrying Passengers for Hire

NAVIGATION LIGHTS AND SOUND-PRODUCING DEVICES 27.1-1. Requirements, all vessels.-Motorboats shall comply with the requirements of Part 25 concerning navigation lights, whistles, other sound-producing mechanical appliances, and fog bells. Motor vessels are subject to the provisions of the pilot rules regarding navigation lights, whistles, bells, and other sound-producing devices applicable to the waters navigated.

RESUSCITATION OF THE APPARENTLY DROWNED

When a person has been rendered unconscious by fumigation gas, by electric shock, drowning, or any other cause, and breathing ceases or becomes very shallow, artificial respiration should be begun at

Proceed as follows: 1. Lay the patient on his belly, one arm extended directly overhead, the other arm bent at elbow, and with the face turned outward

once.

and resting on hand or forearm, so that the nose and mouth are free for breathing

2. Kneel straddling the patient's thighs with your knees placed at such a distance below his hip bones as will allow you to reach his waist easily. Place the palms of the hands on the small of his back with fingers resting on his ribs, the little finger just touching the lowest rib, with the thumb and fingers in a natural position, and the tips of the fingers just out of sight.

3. With arms held straight, swing forward slowly, so that the weight of your body is gradually brought to bear upon the patient. Your shoulder should be directly over the heel of your hand at the end of the forward swing. Do not bend your elbows. This operation should take about 2 seconds.

4. Now immediately swing backward so as to remove the pressure completely.

5. After 2 seconds swing forward again. Thus repeat deliberately 12 to 15 times a minute the double movement of compression and release, a complete respiration in 4 or 5 seconds.

6. Continue artificial respiration without interruption until natural breathing is restored, 4 hours or longer if necessary, or until a physician declares the patient is dead.

7. As soon as this artificial respiration has been started, and while it is being continued, an assistant should loosen any tight clothing about the patient's neck, chest, or waist. Keep the patient warm. Do not give any liquids whatever by mouth until the patient is fully conscious.

8. To avoid strain on the heart when the patient revives, he should be kept lying down and not allowed to stand or sit up. If the doctor has not arrived by the time the patient has revived, the patient should be given some stimulant, such as 1 teaspoonful of aromatic spirits of ammonia in a small glass of water or a hot drink of coffee or tea, etc. The patient should be kept warm.

9. Resuscitation should be carried on at the nearest possible point to the place where the patient received his injuries. He should not be moved from this point until he is breathing normally of his own volition, and then moved only in a lying position. Should it be necessary, due to extreme weather conditions, etc., to move the patient before he is breathing normally, resuscitation should be carried on during the time that he is being moved.

10. A brief return of natural respiration is not a certain indication for stopping the resuscitation. Not infrequently the patient, after a temporary recovery of respiration, stops breathing again. The patient must be watched, and, if natural breathing stops, artificial respiration should be resumed at once.

11. In carrying out resuscitation, it may be necessary to change the operator. This change must be made without losing the rhythm of respiration. By this procedure, no confusion results at the time of change of operator, and a regular rhythm is kept up. The treatment must not be given up until at least 4 hours of steady, unremitting resuscitation have been tried, unless, of course, the patient commences to breathe strongly and naturally of his own volition.

NAVIGATION CHARTS, MIDDLE AND UPPER

MISSISSIPPI RIVER

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