The History of the Parliament of England: Which Began November the Third, M.DC.XL.; with a Short and Necessary View of Some Precedent Years

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Imprinted by M. Bell, for G. Thomason, 1812 - 337 páginas
Contents: Reprint of 1647 edition, imprinted by Moses Bell, for George Thomason, London.
 

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Página 74 - I, AB, do in the Presence of Almighty God promise, vow and protest, To maintain and defend as far as lawfully I may, with my life, power and estate, the True Reformed Protestant Religion, expressed in the Doctrine of the Church of England...
Página 7 - O All-seeing Light, and eternal Life of all things ! to whom nothing is either so great that it may resist, or so small that it is contemned ; look upon my misery with thine eye of mercy, and let thine infinite power vouchsafe to limit out some proportion of deliverance unto me, as to thee shall seem most convenient.
Página 85 - ... of his saintly exercises, a prayer stolen word for word from the mouth of a Heathen woman praying to a Heathen God, and that in no serious book, but in the vain amatorious poem of Sir Philip Sidney's Arcadia...
Página 258 - But, I assure you, on the word of a king, I never did intend any force, but shall proceed against them in a legal and fair way, for I never meant any other.
Página 301 - That shall have power to assemble and call together all and singular his majesty's subjects within the county of as well within liberties as without, that are meet and fit for the wars, and them to train, exercise, and put in readiness, and them, after their abilities and faculties, well and sufficiently, from time to time, to cause to be arrayed and weaponed, and to take the muster of them in places most fit for that purpose.
Página 258 - I must tell you, gentlemen, that so long as these persons that I have accused, for no slight crime, but for treason, are here, I cannot expect that this house will be in the right way that I do heartily wish it. Therefore I am come to tell you, that I must have them wheresoever I find them.
Página 226 - ... provisions and remedies which might, by the wisdom of your Majesty and counsel of your Parliament, be opposed against them. For preventing whereof, and the better information of your Majesty, your Peers and all other your loyal subjects, we have been necessitated to make a declaration of the state of the kingdom, both before and since the assembly of this Parliament, unto this time, which we do humbly present to your Majesty, without the least intention to lay any blemish upon your royal person,...
Página 257 - That they have traitorously endeavoured to subvert the rights and very being of Parliaments. 6. That for the completing of their traitorous designs, they have endeavoured (as far as in them lay), by force and terror to compel the Parliament to join with them in their traitorous designs, and to that end have actually raised and countenanced tumults against the King and Parliament.
Página 85 - God, and that in no serious book, but in the vain amatorious poem of Sir Philip Sidney's Arcadia : a book in that kind full of worth and wit, but among religious thoughts and duties not worthy to be named nor to be read at any time without good caution, much less in time of trouble and affliction to be a Christian's prayer-book...
Página 314 - What would you have ? Have I violated your laws ? Have I denied to pass any one bill for the ease and security of my subjects ? I do not ask you what you have done for me.

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