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[ No. 20.]

COMMUNICATION from the Executive, transmitting names of per

sons pardoned, and the reasons therefor, up to the first of January, 1857.

EXECUTIVE OFFICE,

Lansing, February 12, 1857. To the Legislature:

I transmit herewith the names of the persons pardoned up to the first of January last, and the reasons therefor, in conformity to the requirements of the Constitution.

Ami Filley, convicted in the county of Wayne, September 1, 1851., of the crime of conspiracy, and sentenced to ten years' imprisonment. Pardoned January 5, 1855.

This was the only one of the “ railroad conspirators,” so called, remaining in prison, all the others having been pardoned by my prede

The prosecutors in the case joined with a great number of citizens in asking his liberation.

Henry Hoch-Convicted in the county of Hillsdale, October, 1851, of the crime of perjury, and sentenced to ten years’ imprisonment. Pardoned February 12, 1855.

Upon the most satisfactory evidence that he was improperly convicted.

Lyman Nelson-Convicted in the county of Lenawee, Marcb, 1853,

cessor.

of the crime of forgery, was sentenced to two years' imprisonment. Pardoned February 13, 1855.

This young man was pardoned but a few days before the expiration of his sentence, upon the solicitation of the prosecuting attorney and others, with the hope that it would prove an incentive to good behavior.

Alonzo B. Hoyt-Convicted in the county of Monroe, in April, 1851, of the crime of larceny, and sentenced to six years' imprisonment. Pardoned January 31, 1855.

This man was pardoned upon the certificate of the physician of the prison that he was far gone with the consumption, and would not probably live six months; his friends earnestly desired that they might have the care of bim.

Henry H. Whaley—Convicted in the county of St. Joseph, in December, 1853, of the crime of seduction, and sentenced to two years' imprisonment. Pardoned March 20, 1855.

Pardon was granted in this case upon proof that the prisoner had been a respectable man, and affidavits that the complainant was not a person of good character, and had admitted that he was wrongly convicted.

Hon. J. S. Barry, H. H. Riley, Chas. Upson and several hundreds of others, joined in the petition, which was concurred in by Judge Whipple, who sentenced him.

Cornelius Bixby, convicted in the county of St. Joseph, in September, 1853, of the crime of receiving stolen property, and sentenced to two years' imprisonment. Pardoned April 11, 1855.

Judge Whipple, before whom this man was convicted, represented to me that he was a dupe of a band of plunderers who were brought to justice through his instrumentality, and he united with Hon. Charles Upson, Prosecuting Attorney, and a great many others in recommend ing his pardon.

Eliza Beesly, convicted in the county of Wayne, in December, 1854, of the crime of receiving stolen property, and sentenced to two years' imprisonment. Pardoned March 17, 1855.

This was a colored woman whose situation was such that the State might be involved in great expense to take care of her. She was par

condition that she should leave the State forever.

doned upon

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William Bowen, convicted in the county of Branch, in October, 1852, of the crime of larceny, and sentenced to three years' imprisonment. Pardoned June 12, 1855.

Pardon was granted in this case, upon the certificate of the Prison Physician that the convict was confined to the hospital with inflammatory rheumatism, with no prospect of his being able to labor before the expiration of his sentence. The officers of the Prison, Hon. J. E. Beebe and others, united in the request.

John Smith, convicted in the county of Wayne, in June, 1855, of the crime of illegal voting, and sentenced to sixty days' imprisonment. Pardoned July 4, 1855.

In this and the succeeding case, William A. Cook, Esq., counsel for defendant, produced the certificate of the Board who received these votes, and other testimony, that the votes were cast under a misapprehension, and not with the intent to violate the law.

Peter Ohsut, convicted, sentenced and pardoned as above.

William Barrett, convicted in the county of Calhoun, in July, 1850, of the crime of burglary, and sentenced to twenty-one and a half years? imprisonment. Pardoned July 10, 1855.

This was an old negro who, in his petition, said he was sixty-six years of age, forty-five of which had been passed in slavery and fourteen in State Prison. His pardon was asked by all the officers of the Prison, and was pardoned upon condition that he would forever leave the State.

Joseph Gary, convicted in the county of Berrien, in September, 1852, of the crime of counterfeiting, and sentenced to thrce years' imprisonment. Pardoned June 20, 1855.

This was a young man who was convicted of passing a twenty-five cent piece of counterfeit coin. Judge Whipple, before whom he was convicted, in a letter to me doubted his guilt, and strongly urged the exercise of clemency. His good conduct was certified to by the officers of the prison, who joined with his friends in desiring his pardon.

Theodore Barker, convicted in the county of Calhoun, in July, 1852, of the crime of larceny, and sentenced to five years' imprisonment. Pardonod August 18, 1855.

This man, well educated and of highly respectable connections, in a fit of intoxication committed larceny. The Rev. J. S. Smart, the Rev. H. N. Strong, and many others who know him, interceded earnestly in his behalf, and a pardon was granted upon condition that he abstain forever from intoxicating drinks.

Joseph Warren, convicted in the county of Wayne, in August, 1855, of libel. Pardoned August 10, 1855.

The reasons for granting this pardon were that the libelous matter of the publication of which he was convicted, was in all probability intended for mere political effect and not the personal injury of the prosecutor. This publication was followed by others of a retaliatory kind on the part of the prosecutor, personally charging the accused with crime, for which the accused instituted suits for damages. The prosecutor before the indictment was found gave in evidence in mitigation of damages, the very article set forth in the indictment, and thus substantially defeated a recovery, and it was upon the whole thought best to put an end to the irritating strife by interposing a pardon.

Edmund Grandy, convicted in the county of Lenawee, in April, 1854, of the crime of rape, and sentenced to three years' imprisonment. Pardoned September 19, 1855.

This man was proved to have borno a character of great respectability and had a family. Hon. R. R. Beecher and others, expressed great doubts of his guilt. His aged father and his brother of the Society of Friends, believe him to have been the victim of a conspiracy.

Margaret Mandiville, convicted in the county of Wayne, of the crime of assault and battery, in April, 1855, and sentenced to one year's imprisonment. Pardoned October 17, 1855.

Pardon was granted at the end of six months' imprisonment upon the discovery of some addittional testimony which rendered her guilt doubtful. Hon. D. Stuart and others took a deep interest in obtaining her release.

Gardiner Chappell, convicted in the county of Clinton, in May, 1855, of the crime against nature, and sentenced to two years' imprisonment. Pardoned October 31st, 1855.

This boy was pardoned on account of bis extreme youth, with the hope that he might yet become a good citizen, and because bis mother was importunate. R. Strickland, prosecuting attorney, A. Baker and many others, signed the petition.

David E. Powers, convicted in the county of Kalamazoo in September, 1853, of the crime of forgery, and sentenced to five years' imprisonment. Pardoned December 6, 1855.

This was a young man who obtained money upon a forged note. The prison physician certified that he was partially insane, and his pardon was recommended by Marsh Giddings, Dwight May and many others.

Andrew Lepper, convicted in the county of Kalamazoo, in November, 1853, of the crime of rape," and sentenced to four years' imprisonment. Pardoned September 19th, 1855.

This was a boy but fifteen years of age when the crime was committed, and the Hon. Dwight May, prosecuting attorney, certified that the petition for his pardon was signed by high minded, honorable, intelligent mer, comprising lawyers, mechanics and farmers, and that the county contained no persons of a higher grade of morals.

Robert Cary, convicted in the county of Wayne, in September, 1854, of the crimes of burglary and larceny, and sentenced to two years' imprisonment. Pardoned December 6, 1855.

Pardon asked by John Winder, A. Sheley, S. M. Holmes, N. B. Carpenter, and a great number of respectable citizens of Detroit, and recommended by H. D. Perry who prosecuted, and Judge Douglass who sentenced him, who said if he had known of his previous good character, he should only have sentenced him for one year.

George Tefft, convicted in the county of St. Joseph, in December, 1847, of the crime of rape, and sentenced to ten years' imprisonment. Pardoned December 11, 1855.

This was a young man convicted before Judge Ransom. The Judge, prosecuting officer, the county officers of St. Joseph, and a large number of citizens united in an appeal for his liberation after service in the State prison for eight years.

William Hentman, convicted in the county of Branch, in April, 1856, of the crime of counterfeiting, and sentenced to five years' imprisonment. Pardoned November 22, 1856.

The pardon of this man was asked for by Hon. E. H. C. Wilson, Circuit Judge, and J. W. Turner, prosecuting attorney of Branch county, to whom he had made disclosures that would convict his confederates.

Melvin D. [lazzard, convicted in the county of Hillsdale, in April, 1855, of the crime of larceny, and sentenced to five years' imprisonment. Pardoned November 21, 1855.

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