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of the United States authorized to enforce the navigation laws of the United States.

Exemptions Sec. 18. The proviso contained in the last paragraph of section 2 of the Act of May 11, 1918 (40 Stat. 549), shall apply also with like force and effect to motorboats as defined in this Act.

Motorboats as defined in this Act are hereby exempted from the provisions of Revised Statutes 4399, as amended (48 Stat. 125).

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Certificate of award of number; exemptions Sec. 21. The provisions of section 210 of title II of the AntiSmuggling Act, approved August 5, 1935 (49 Stat. 526; U. S. C., 1934 edition, Supp. IV, title 46, sec. 288), requiring a certificate of award of a number to be kept at all times on board of the vessel to which the number has been awarded shall not apply to any vessel not exceeding seventeen feet in length measured from end to end over the deck, excluding sheer, or to any vessel whose design of fittings are such that the carrying of a certificate of award of the number on such vessel would render such certificate imperfect, illegible, or would otherwise tend to destroy its usefulness as a means of ready identification.

REGULATIONS OF THE COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF THE

TREASURY

PILOT RULES FOR WESTERN RIVERS 24 332.01 General instructions. The regulations in this part govern the pilots of vessels propelled by steam, gas fluid, naphtha, or electric motors and of other vessels propelled by machinery, navigating the Red River of the North, the Mississippi River, and other rivers emptying into the Gulf of Mexico and their tributaries.

RULES FOR VESSELS PASSING EACH OTHER 25

332.02 Definitions and risk of collision.-In this part the words “steam vessel” and “steamer” shall include any vessel propelled by machinery.

Risk of collision can, when circumstances permit, be ascertained by carefully watching the compass bearing of an approaching vessel. If the bearing does not appreciably change, such risk should be deemed to exist.

332.1 Approaching from opposite directions.—When steamers are approaching each other from opposite directions, the signals for passing shall be one short and distinct blast of the whistle to alter course to starboard so as to pass on the portside of the other, and two short and distinct blasts of the whistle to alter course to port so as to pass on the starboard side of the other.

When two vessels are meeting end on, or nearly end on, so as to involve risk of collision, each shall alter her course to starboard, so that each may pass on the portside of the other. 24 Code of Federal Regulations, Title 33, Chapter III, Part 332. .35 Issued under the authority contained in R. S. 4412; 46 U.S. C.381 (p. 36).'

When an ascending steamer is approaching a descending steamer, the pilot of the ascending steamer shall give the first signal for passing, which shall be promptly answered by the same signal by the pilot of the descending steamer, if safe to do so, and both shall be governed accordingly; but if the pilot of the descending steamer deems it dangerous to take the side indicated by the ascending steamer, he shall immediately signify that fact by sounding the alarm or danger signal of four or more short and rapid blasts of the whistle, and it shall be the duty of the pilot of the ascending steamer to answer by a signal of four or more short and rapid blasts of the whistle, and the engines of both steamers shall be immediately stopped, and backed if necessary, until the signals for passing are given and answered. After sounding the alarm signal by both steamers, the pilot of the descending steamer shall indicate by his whistle the side on which he desires to pass, and the pilot of the ascending steamer shall govern himself accordingly, the descending steamer being entitled to the right of way.

Where possible, the signals for passing must be made, answered, and understood before the steamers have arrived at a distance of half a mile of each other.

Provided, however, That when a steamer on the Mississippi River is about to enter the Ohio River at the same time that a steamer on the Ohio River is about to enter the Mississippi River, at Cairo Point, the steamer on the Mississippi River shall give the first signal; but in no case shall pilots on steamers attempt to pass each other until there has been a thorough understanding as to the side each steamer shall take.

332.2 Danger and cross signals.-If from any cause the signals for passing are not made at the proper time, as provided in paragraph 332.1, or should the signals be given and not properly understood, from any cause whatever, and either steamer become imperiled thereby, the pilot on either steamer may be the first to sound the alarm or danger signal, which shall consist of four or more short and rapid blasts of the whistle. Whenever the danger signal is given, the engines of both steamers shall be stopped and backed until the headway of the steamers has been fully checked; nor shall the engines of either steamer be again started ahead until the steamers can safely pass each other. Steamers approaching each other from opposite directions are forbidden to use what has become technically known among pilots as "cross signals”—that is, answering one whistle with two, and answering two whistles with one. In all cases, and under all circumstances, a pilot receiving either of the whistle signals provided in the rules in this part, which for any reason he deems injudicious to comply with, instead of answering it with a cross signal, shall at once observe the provisions of this section.

332.3 Narrow channels.-When two stea ers are about to enter a narrow channel at the same time, the ascending steamer shall be stopped below such channel until the descending steamer shall have passed through it; but should two steamers unavoidably meet in such channel, then it shall be the duty of the pilot of the ascending steamer to make the proper signals, and when answered, the ascending steamer shall lie as close as possible to the side of the channel the exchange of signals may have determined, as provided by paragraph 332.1, and

either stop the engines or move them so as only to give the boat steerageway, and the pilot of the descending steamer shall cause his steamer to be worked slowly until he has passed the ascending steamer.

332.4 Approaching bridge span or draw.—When two steamers are approaching a bridge span or draw from opposite directions and the passing signals as provided in paragraph 332.1 have been given and understood, should the pilot of the descending steamer deem it dangerous for the steamers to pass each other between the piers of such span or draw, he shall sound the alarm or danger signal, and it shall then be the duty of the pilot of the ascending steamer to answer with a similar alarm signal, and to slow or stop his engines below such span or draw until the descending steamer shall have passed.

332.5 Ascending steamer close on a bar or shore.—When a steamer is ascending and running close on a bar or shore, the pilot shall in no case attempt to cross the river when a descending steamer shall be so near that it would be possible for a collision to ensue therefrom.

332.6 Nearing short bend or point.-When any steamer, whether ascending or descending, is nearing a short bend or point where, from any cause, a steamer approaching in an opposite direction cannot be seen at a distance of 600 yards, the pilot of such steamer, when he shall have arrived within 600 yards of that bend or point, shall give a signal of one long sound of his whistle, as a notice to any steamer within hearing that may be approaching on the other side, and within half a mile of such bend or point; and should there be any such approaching steamer within hearing of such signal, it shall be the duty of the pilot thereof to answer such signal by one long sound of his whistle, when both steamers shall be navigated with the proper precautions, as required by the rules in this part.

332.7 Moving from dock.--When a steamer is moved from its dock or berth, and other steamers are liable to approach such steamer from any direction, such steamer and any approaching steamer shall give the same signals as in case of steamers meeting at a bend; but immediately after clearing the dock or berth so as to be fully in sight, they shall be governed by the rules in this part for passing.

332.8 Overtaking. When a steamer is overtaking another steamer, and the overtaking steamer shall desire to pass on the right or starboard side of the steamer ahead, the overtaking steamer shall give one short blast of the whistle, and if the steamer ahead answers with one blast, the overtaking steamer may pass on the starboard side of the steamer ahead; or if the overtaking steamer shall desire to pass on the left or port side of the steamer ahead, she shall give two short blasts of the whistle, and if the steamer ahead answers with two blasts the overtaking steamer may pass on the port side of the steamer ahead; or if the steamer ahead does not think it safe for the overtaking steamer to attempt to pass at that point, she shall immediately signify the same by giving not less than four short and rapid blasts of the whistle, and under no circumstances shall the overtaking steamer attempt to pass the steamer ahead until such time as they have reached a point where it can be safely done, when the steamer ahead shall signify her willingness by blowing one blast of the whistle for the overtaking steamer to pass on the starboard side of the steamer ahead, or two blasts of the whistle for the overtaking steamer to pass Every steamer overtaking another shall keep out of the way of the overtaken steamer. Every steamer coming up with another steamer from any direction more than two points abaft her beam shall be deemed to be an overtaking steamer, and no subsequent alteration of the bearing between the two steamers shall make the overtaking steamer a crossing steamer within the meaning of the rules in this part, or relieve her of the duty of keeping clear of the overtaken steamer until she is finally passed and clear. If the overtaking steamer is in doubt as to whether she is forward of or abaft this direction, she shall assume that she is an overtaking steamer and keep out of the way.

The steamer ahead shall in no case attempt to cross the bow or crowd upon the course of the overtaking steamer.

332.9 Approaching at right angles or obliquely.—When two steamers are approaching each other at right angles or obliquely so as to involve risk of collision, other than when one steamer is overtaking another, the steamer which has the other on her own port side shall hold her course and speed; and the steamer which has the other on her own starboard side shall keep out of the way of the other by directing her course to starboard so as to cross the stern of the other steamer, or, if necessary to do so, slacken her speed or stop or reverse. The steamer having the other on her own port bow shall blow one blast of her whistle as a signal of her intention to cross the bow of the other, holding her course and speed, which signal shall be promptly answered by the other steamer by one short blast of her whistle as a signal of her intention to direct her course to starboard so as to cross the stern of the other steamer or otherwise keep clear.

If from any cause whatever the conditions covered by this situation are such as to prevent immediate compliance with each other's signals, the misunderstanding or objection shall be at once made apparent by blowing the alarm signal, and both steamers shall be stopped, and backed if necessary, until signals for passing with safety are made and understood.

332.10 Passing signals.— The passing signals, by the blowing of the whistle, shall be given and answered by pilots, in compliance with the rules in this part, when approaching each other; and, wherever possible, the signals shall be given and answered before the steamers have arrived at a distance of half a mile of each other.

332.10a Visual signal.—All whistle signals shall be further indicated by a visual signal consisting of an amber colored light so located as to be visible all around the horizon for a distance of not less than one mile. This light shall be so devised that it will operate simultaneously and in conjunction with the whistle sounding mechanism, and remain ignited or visible during the same period as the sound signal: Provided, That the installation, use, or employment of the amber visual signal required by this section shall be optional in the case of (a) vessels operating upon the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway; (6) vessels operating on the Mississippi River below mile 237 AHP (Belmont Landing) as set forth in map No. 40,"Maps of the Mississippi River, Cairo, Illinois, to the Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana (1944 ed.)”, published by the Mississippi River Commission; (c) newly constructed vessels while en route from point of construction to a point

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in waters where the aforementioned amber visual signal is not required; (d) motorboats of class A and class 1; and (e) motorboats of class 2' and class 3 not engaged in trade or commerce.

332.11 Departure from rules.- In obeying and construing the rules in this part due regard shall be had to all dangers of navigation and collision, and to any special circumstances which may render a departure from said rules necessary in order to avoid immediate danger.

332.12 Fog signals.--In fog, mist, falling snow, or heavy rainstorms, whether by day or night, the signals described in this rule shall be used by steam vessels:

(a) A steam vessel under way in fog or thick weather shall sound, at intervals of not more than 1 minute, a prolonged blast of the whistle, of from 4 to 6 seconds' duration, except that when towing one or more vessels she shall sound three blasts of the whistle in quick succession.

(6) A steam vessel when at anchor in fog or thick weather shall, at intervals of not more than 1 minute, ring the bell rapidly for about 5 seconds.

(c) Steamers on rivers whose waters flow into the Gulf of Mexico, lying to during fog or thick weather, when the fog whistle or any sound is heard indicating the approach of another steamer, shall, if lying on the right shore, or right bank, give one tap of the bell; if lying on left shore, or left bank, give two taps of the bell, at intervals of not more than 1 minute, to indicate their presence, which signals shall continue until the approaching steamer has passed. Right and left shore or bank is understood by facing downstream or with the flow of the current.

332.13 Speed in fog; posting of rules; diagrams.-(a) Moderate speed in fog.-Every steam vessel shall, in thick weather, by reason of fog, mist, falling snow, heavy rainstorms, or other causes, go at moderate speed. A steam vessel hearing, apparently not more than four points from right ahead, the fog signal of another vessel shall at once reduce her speed to bare steerageway, and navigate with caution until the vessels shall have passed each other.

(6) Posting of Pilot Rules.-On steam and other motor vessels of over 100 gross tons two copies of the placard form of the rules in this part (Form 805) shall be kept posted up in conspicuous places in the vessel, one copy of which shall be kept posted up in the pilothouse. On steam and other motor vessels of over 25 gross tons and not over 100 gross tons, two copies of the placard form of pilot rules shall be kept on board, one copy of which shall be kept posted up in the pilothouse. On steam and other motor vessels of 25 gross tons and under, and of more than 10 gross tons, two copies of the placard form of the pilot rules shall be kept on board, and where practicable one copy thereof shall be kept conspicuously posted up in the vessel. On steam and other motor vessels of not more than 10 gross tons, two copies of the pamphlet form of the pilot rules shall be kept on board, and where practicable one copy thereof shall be kept conspicuously posted up in the vessel.

Nothing herein contained shall require copies of the Pilot Rules to be carried on board any motorboat as defined by section 1 of the act of April 25, 1940 (54 Stat. 163-167; 46 U. S. C. 526-526t).

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