The Records of the Federal Convention of 1787, Volumen1

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Yale University Press, 1911 - 1352 páginas
 

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Wow what a fantastic resource. To have the day to day discussions of the Framers in their words is to illuminate The Constitution with 3D glasses. The sheer scope of knowledge of History of these men who off the cuff discuss the Helvetic Cantons and German States, weaknesses and strengths in regard to writing a Constitution for this New Atlantis. To leaf through is to come to see that we were blessed with a multitude of geniuses, as well as a rich and temperate land, well positioned between the Oceans; coming to power while Europe was busy with The French Revolution, and then distracted by Napoleon. And to have not one or two of these men, but a room full of educated LIberal (Classically so, of course) Gentlemen, embarking consciously to create Something New Under The Sun, is miraculous! 

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Página 451 - I have lived, sir, a long time, and the longer I live the more convincing proofs I see of this truth — that GOD governs in the affairs of men. And if a sparrow cannot fall to the ground without His notice, is it probable that an empire can rise without His aid? We have been assured, sir, in the Sacred Writings, that ' except the Lord build the house, they labor in vain that build it.
Página 47 - That each branch ought to possess the right of originating acts; that the National Legislature ought to be empowered to enjoy the Legislative rights vested in Congress by the Confederation, and moreover to legislate in all cases to which the separate States are incompetent, or in which the harmony of the United States may be interrupted by the exercise of individual legislation...
Página 33 - That a national government ought to be established, consisting of a supreme Legislative, Executive and Judiciary " The motion for postponing was seconded by Mr.
Página 21 - ... ineligible to any office established by a particular State , or under the authority of the United States , except those peculiarly belonging to the functions of the first branch...
Página 54 - ... the use of force, the more he doubted the practicability, the justice, and the efficacy of it, when applied to people collectively, and not individually. A union of the states containing such an ingredient seemed to provide for its own destruction. The use of force against a state would look more like a declaration of war than an infliction of punishment, and would probably be considered by the party attacked as a dissolution of all previous compacts by which it might be bound.
Página 236 - ... that the National Legislature ought to be empowered to enjoy the Legislative rights vested in Congress by the Confederation, and moreover to legislate in all cases to which the separate States are incompetent, or in which the harmony of the United States may be interrupted by the exercise of individual legislation ; to negative all laws passed by the several States contravening, in the opinion of the National Legislature, the Articles of Union, or any treaty subsisting under the authority of...
Página 117 - Resolved that provision ought to be made for the admission of States lawfully arising within the limits of the United States, whether from a voluntary junction of Government and Territory or otherwise, with the consent of a number of voices in the National legislature less than the whole.
Página 194 - Resolved that the Legislative Executive and Judiciary powers within the several States ought to be bound by oath to support the articles of Union 15. Resolved that the amendments which shall be offered to the Confederation, by the Convention ought at a proper time, or times, after the approbation of Congress to be submitted to an assembly or assemblies...
Página 42 - Philadelphia for the sole and express purpose of revising the articles of Confederation and reporting to Congress and the several legislatures such alterations and provisions therein as shall, when agreed to in Congress and confirmed by the States, render the federal Constitution adequate to the exigencies of government and the preservation of the Union.
Página 22 - Resd. that the amendments which shall be offered to the Confederation, by the Convention ought at a proper time, or times, after the approbation of Congress to be submitted to an assembly or assemblies of Representatives, recommended by the several Legislatures to be expressly chosen by the people, to consider & decide thereon.

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