Ulysses S. Grant, 1861-1864: His Rise from Obscurity to Military Greatness

Portada
McFarland, 2014 M07 15 - 324 páginas
On May 3, 1861, Illinois Governor Richard Yates appointed a Mexican War veteran with Democratic sympathies and southern ties to be chief mustering officer at Camp Yates in Springfield. And so began Ulysses S. Grant's reluctantly revived military career. Over the next three years, Grant would have a chance to display a myriad of talents few suspected, including a remarkable penchant for organization, decided skill at written communication and a quick understanding of military potential. By March 1864, Grant had risen to lieutenant general, a rank last held by George Washington. This biography details the three years which saw Ulysses S. Grant's extraordinary rise from mediocre shop clerk to general-in-chief of the U.S. Army. Beginning with Grant's work at his family's leather shop in Galena, Illinois, it records his re-entry into a military life as a volunteer from Illinois. Grant's most spectacular campaigns, including Vicksburg and Chattanooga, are discussed in depth. Special emphasis is placed on events such as politicking, rumors, and intrigue which took place between the various battles. Other topics include Grant's personal qualities and background, his extraordinary good fortune and the general's informal and unorthodox command style. The work is indexed.

Dentro del libro

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - USGrant - LibraryThing

Heavily documented with much material from Grant's papers, this is an incisive analysis of Grant's military career up to the date of his promotion to Lieutenant General in 1864. Leer comentario completo

Páginas seleccionadas

Contenido

Introduction
1
Galena Illinois
11
Springfield Illinois
19
Colonel Grant
26
Florida Missouri
33
Brigadier General Grant
40
Paducah Kentucky
47
Calm Before the Storm
54
The Most Anxious Period of the War
127
Acoustic Shadow at Iuka
132
The Battle of Corinth
139
The First Vicksburg Campaign
146
The Beginning of Total War
153
The Second Vicksburg Campaign
161
Steele Bayou Expedition
175
Champion Hill
190

Belmont Missouri
61
Winter Quarters
69
Cairo Dogs of War
76
Fort Donelson
83
Americas Most Wanted Man
91
Shiloh
98
Disgrace
106
The Occupation of Memphis
112
Reunited with Family
119
MajorGeneral Grant
210
New Orleans
223
Missionary Ridge
239
Celebrity in St Louis
256
LieutenantGeneral Grant
271
Notes
285
Bibliography
309
Derechos de autor

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 126 - My paramount object in this struggle is to save the Union, and is not either to save or to destroy slavery. If I could save the Union without freeing any slave, I would do it ; and if I could save it by freeing all the slaves, I would do it ; and if I could save it by freeing some and leaving others alone, I would also do that.
Página 88 - Yours of this date, proposing armistice and appointment of Commissioners to settle terms of capitulation, is just received. No terms except an unconditional and immediate surrender can be accepted. I propose to move immediately upon your works.
Página 92 - His army seems to be as much demoralized by the victory of Fort Donelson as was that of the Potomac by the defeat of Bull Run.
Página 36 - It occurred to me at once that Harris had been as much afraid of me as I had been of him. This was a view of the question I had never taken before, but it was one I never forgot afterward.
Página 80 - I was received with so little cordiality that I perhaps stated the object of my visit with less clearness than I might have done, and I had not uttered many sentences before I was cut short as if my plan was preposterous. I returned to Cairo very much crestfallen.
Página 19 - ... The armies of Europe are machines: the men are brave and the officers capable; but the majority of the soldiers in most of the nations of Europe are taken from a class of people who are not very intelligent and who have very little interest in the contest in which they are called upon to take part. Our armies were composed of men who were able to read, men who knew what they were fighting for...
Página 50 - I have nothing to do with opinions, and shall deal only with armed rebellion and its aiders and abettors. You can pursue your usual avocations without fear. The strong arm of the Government is here to protect its friends and punish its enemies. Whenever it is manifest that you are able to defend yourselves and maintain the authority of the Government and protect the rights of loyal citizens, I shall withdraw the forces under my command. "US GRANT, Brigadier-General Commanding.
Página 126 - If it cannot be whipped in any other way than through a war against slavery, let it come to that legitimately. If it is necessary that slavery should, fall that the Republic may continue its existence, let slavery go.

Acerca del autor (2014)

William Farina has written books on Arthurian legend, early Christianity, the American Civil War, Shakespeare and baseball. He lives in Chicago and works as a real estate consultant for the federal government.

Información bibliográfica