The Uncollected Writings of Thomas De Quincey, Volumen1

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Scribner and Welford, 1890
 

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Página 49 - But enough of this ; there is such a variety of game springing up before me that I am distracted in my choice and know not which to follow. It is sufficient to say, according to the proverb, that here is God's plenty.
Página 287 - Mr. Kingston, I hear say I shall not die before noon, and I am very sorry therefore, for I thought to be dead by this time, and past my pain.
Página 49 - Porta could not have described their natures better than by the marks which the poet gives them. The matter and manner of their tales and of their telling are so suited to their different educations, humours, and callings that each of them would be improper in any other mouth.
Página 49 - He must have been a man of a most wonderful comprehensive nature, because, as it has been truly observed of him, he has taken into the compass of his " Canterbury Tales" the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in his age.
Página 195 - maps " tracing " the routes of armies ;" " plates exhibiting the costumes" of different nations : and more especially we agree with him (at p. 135) that in teaching the classics the tutor should have at hand " plates or drawings of ships, temples, houses, altars, domestic and sacred utensils, robes, and of every object of which they are likely to read." " It is," as he says, " impossible to calculate the injury which the minds of children suffer from the habit of receiving imperfect ideas : " and...
Página 229 - English beauty, peace, and pastoral solitude, — you may possibly recall, even from that flying glimpse you had of it, a modern house called Allan Bank, standing under a low screen of woody rocks which descend from the hill of Silver How, on the western side of the lake. This house had been then recently built by a worthy merchant of Liverpool, but for some reason, of no importance to you and me, not being immediately wanted for the family of the owner, had been let for a term of three years to...
Página 96 - These, or words like these, in which Wordsworth conveys the sudden apocalypse, as by an apparition, to an ardent and sympathising spirit, of the stupendous world of America, rising, at once, like an exhalation, with all its shadowy forests, its endless savannas, and its pomp of solitary waters...
Página 239 - The young stranger did the service required of him ; the villain was turned and fled southwards ; the hunters, lance in rest, rushed after him ; all bowed their thanks as they fled past ; the fleet cavalcade again took the high road ; they doubled the cape which shut them out of sight ; and in a moment all had disappeared, and left the quiet valley to its original silence, whilst the young stranger and two grave Westmoreland
Página viii - I rejoin that I know not but you may have cut Blackwood — even as a subscriber — a whole lustrum ago. He rebuts, by urging a just compliment paid to you, as a supposed contributor, in the News of Literature and Fashion, but a moon or two ago.
Página 154 - I do not remember that any public event of our own times has touched me so nearly, or so much with the feelings belonging to a private affliction, as the death of Mr.

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