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Two Active, Sprightly, Intelligent Little Beings

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ONE A YOUNG MAN ABOUT 20 YEARS OF AGE,

334 inches in height, weighing 30 pounds.

294 inches in height, weighing only 17 pounds. THE OTHER A YOUNG LADY 11 OR 12 YEARS OF AGE,

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CAN BE SEEN AT THE CORNER OF BROADWAY & LEONARD STS.

FOR A MONTH OR TWO, Where they have already been exhibited to Crowds of Visitors for Three or Four Months!

They were taken from the newly discovered and IDOLATROUS CITY OF IXIMAIA, IN CENTRAL America, where they have been kept with superstitious veneration, distinct and secluded, as & Caste of their Priesthood, and employed as mimes and bacchanals in their pagan ceremonies and worship.

NO ADEQUATE DESCRIPTION CAN BE GIVEN OF THEM! For the renson that they are unlike any thing but themselves. They are absolutely a New and Unique Race of Mankind, a most Extraordinary and Inexplicable Phenomena, such as never have been seen by Civilized Nations.

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THE

AMERICAN REVIEW.

No. XC.

FOR JUNE, 1852.

THE CONVENTION – THE PARTY AND THE COMPROMISE.

In the April number of this journal personal, seems necessary before we enter we presented what we sincerely believe to upon the question itselt

. Were it not be a faithful picture of the present Whig for personal motives, the self-aggrandizeAdministration. No one, we think, can ment of professed politicians, and the bitter read that record without admitting the con- remaining dregs of a sectional question afclusion to which it leads, viz., that Whig fording the material for their purpose, it is principles and Whig men are essential to obvious that there would be no difficulty in the country in all great emergencies, and the choice of a candidate by the Convention that this Administration, or its counterpart, to assemble at Baltimore, and but little unmust be perpetuated, would we avoid inter- certainty as to his election. These personal nal discords and disaster, or external strife motives are the bane of our politics. Why and dishonor. But inasmuch as the honor they should exist in a country where every and renown with which the party has been avenue to honorable success is so freely open covered by this Administration have not been as in this, is a matter which we confess we sufficient to produce a perfect unanimity of could never understand. The principle dissentiment as to who should be placed by cernible in most of the discussions we see the party before the country as its candidate is as the grain of wheat to the bushel of for the Presidency, we followed this by a chaff, so obvious is the ulterior purpose discussion of the claims and merits of the through the pretended matter in hand. three distinguished men who are presented This has become so common that to account for that honor. We have done this with all for the line of argument, or the sentiment candor, and endeavored to show the princi- uttered, is the first thought of the reader of ples upon which the choice should be made an editorial leader in a newspaper, or the by the National Convention which is to as- speech of a representative in Congress. semble for that purpose, and have so tried to Why should not men—even politicians contribute to that harmony which is essen- enjoy that greatest luxury of conscious tial to success. It now remains for us to grap- intellectual existence, the having an honple with that question on which alone any est, disinterested opinion and purpose, difference of opinion exists, and which, we and fighting for that? There are, howthink, is the sole barrier to a triumph on ever, let us thank Heaven, many such, which depend the most vital interests of the although they have but the reward of country.

their own consciences. In the first of A preliminary word or two, general and the two articles referred to, we made a VOL. IX.

31

NO. VI.

NEW SERIES.

defense of the present Administration from which they were enabled to agitate the the broad platform of Whig principles, country and open the whole battery of conwithout a thought of gratifying any person- troversy upon the political field. The real predilection, or of advancing any ends ceding by their opponents from this false but those of the cause and the country. position, and the rescinding of the rule, threw We see it charged in one journal that that back the agitators into their abstractions, article was written by some one who is de- and compelled them to abandon the politipendent upon the President for his bread. cal field. There is a lesson in this which To those who, like that editor, can form no cannot be too frequently pondered by statesconception of the possibility of a man being men and people. devoted to any thing but his own personal The proposition for the annexation of interests and aggrandizement, we will take Texas, a measure instigated and upheld this opportunity of saying—for what it may by the Democratic party, presented the be worth to them—that the writer of that very occasion required by the fanatics, article has not the most remote connection by forcing the slavery question into with the Administration, save being a Whig the national politics.

The Whig party, and an American, and that his first choice seeing this as the inevitable consequence, for the Presidency even is not Mr. Fillmore. and looking too to the other results, which In addition to which we will go further, have since become matters of history, to and defy the closest scrutiny to show that grow out of this transaction, which must this journal has ever, from the first day of so intensify the political aspect which the its existence to the present hour, asked question would assume, as to eminently enor received any interest or patronage from danger the very existence of the nation as any leader of the party, in or out of power, such, opposed the measure with the whole except their simple subscriptions and good force of its moral and political influence ; words so far as they could conscientiously feeling that, however desirable it was to exgive them.

This position we shall maintain tend the area of the country, the vast and to the end, come what may; and those who fertile regions we already had were valuecannot believe in it

, or appreciate it, had less without union, and that whatever 'acbetter keep their belief and their conjectures quisitions might be obtained at the price of to themselves, lest they betray their own sectional discords and internal strife were secrets more than they condemn others. worse, far worse, than nothing.

But to the question which we propose to The measure, however, was discuss. What is the true line of policy to ted. A delusive peace ensued. Then folbe observed by the Whig Convention for lowed the fulfilment of the prophecies of the nomination of the candidate for the those Whig statesmen who through obloPresidency on the question of the Compro- quy and scorn had battled for the future mise measures of 1850 ? In order to a prosperity, peace and union of the naclear presentation of the views which we tion, warning against the glittering apple conceive should decide this important ques- of discord thrown in the midst of a happy tion, it is necessary to review some points and prosperous people. An unnecessary in the history of the agitation which those and unjust war was precipitated; but the measures were intended to allay.

great party of sound conservatism, union For many years previous to the annexation and peace did not shrink from the new and of Texas, the question of slavery had only distasteful duties devolved. They unshrinkbeen agitated as a moral subject. Fanatics ingly and victoriously fought the battles had not been able to get it into the political required of them, to the end; and when the arena, although they kept up a constant en- external difficulty was happily adjusted, and deavor to do so by petitions to Congress the real internal danger came upon us in upon the subject. They succeeded for a all its magnitude, although the fulfilment time in this by exasperating their oppo- of its own predictions, it did not leave nents into a denial of the unlimited right those who were the cause to brave it as best of petition, and the passage of a rule that they might, aggrandizing itself by the such petitions should not be received. The country's distress, but with

that true patriotfalse position thus assumed by their oppo- ism which sacrifices all selfish considerations rents gave them a vantage-ground, from for its country, as in the field so in the coun

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