Indian Removal: The Emigration of the Five Civilized Tribes of Indians

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University of Oklahoma Press, 1953 - 423 páginas

It is unlikely that any single book or document will ever earn a more firmly-fixed position of respect and authority than this distinguished volume by Grant Foreman. Originally published in 1932, on the date of the hundredth anniversary of the arrival in Oklahoma of the first Indians as a result of the United States government's relocation of the Five Civilized Tribes, Indian Removal remains today the definitive book in its field.

The forcible uprooting and expulsion of the 60,000 Indians comprising the Five Civilized Tribes, including the Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek, Cherokee, and Seminole, unfolded a story without parallel in the history of the United States. For more than a decade thousands of tragedies and experiences of absorbing interest marked the removal over the "Trail of Tears," but there were no chroniclers at hand to record them. Only occasionally did the tragedy and pathos of some phase of this history-making undertaking beguile a sympathetic officer to turn from routine and write a line or a paragraph of comment.

From fragments in thousands of manuscripts and in official and unofficial reports Grant Foreman gleaned the materials for this book to provide readers with an unbiased day-by-day recital of events.

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Contenido

One The Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek
19
Two Indians Explore the Western Country
31
Choctaws
33
Characteristic River Scene
38
Three Choctaw Emigration Begins
44
Four Suffering of the Emigrants
56
Five Emigration Resumed in 1832
71
Lewis Cass
78
Eighteen Oppression of the Cherokee Indians
229
Nineteen Cherokee Indians Defend their Tribal Existence
238
Twenty A Tragic Migration
251
Cherokee Country of North Carolina
252
TwentyOne The Schermerhorn Treaty
264
TwentyTwo March of the Broken Spirited
279
The Cherokee Trail of Tears 1838
280
TwentyThree A Captive Nation
286

Six Experiences on the March
81
Seven Condition of the Immigrants
93
Eight Efforts to Remove Creek Indians from Alabama
107
Nine An Emigrating Party in 1834
119
Ten Frauds on the Creek Indians
129
Eleven The Creek War of 1836
140
Twelve Wholesale Removal of the Creeks by Force
152
Thirteen A Journal of Events
166
Fourteen Creek SufferingRemoval Completed
177
Fort Gibson
189
Fifteen The Chickasaw Treaty of Pontotoc
193
Sixteen Migration of the Chickasaw Indians
206
Mouth of the Arkansas River 18461847
214
Seventeen Chickasaw Settlements in the West
216
TwentyFour The Trail of Tears
294
Jesse Bushyhead
304
TwentyFive The Seminole Indians
315
TwentySix The Second Seminole War
324
TwentySeven The Fate of Holahte Emathla
332
TwentyEight Hunting the Seminole Indians out of
342
TwentyNine The Capture of Osceola
352
Thirty Seminole Captives Deported
364
View of the Florida Swamps
368
ThirtyOne The Surrender of Pascofa
371
Billy Bowlegs
380
Choctaw Country page 38889
389
Fort Gibson Military Reservation
395
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Acerca del autor (1953)

Grant Foreman (1869-1953), known as the dean of American Indian historians, was the author of Indian Removal, The Five Civilized Tribes , and Sequoyah and editor of Ethan Allen Hitchcock?s Traveler in Indian Territo ry, all published by the University of Oklahoma Press.

Angie Debo was reared in a pioneer community, at Marshall, Oklahoma, where it has been her privilege to know from childhood the folkways of the Indians and the traditions of the western settlers. A member of her community high school's first graduating class, she later attended the University of Oklahoma, where she was a Phi Beta Kappa, and took her B.A. and later her Ph.D. degree; she received her master's degree from the University of Chicago. Her education was combined with intervals of teaching in country schools, starting at the age of sixteen.Miss Debo's distinguished reputation as a regional scholar has been enhanced by her book, The Rise and. Fall of the Choctaw Republic, which won the John H. Dunning prize of the American Historical Society for the best book submitted in the field of United States history in 1934, and for her later, book, And Still the Waters Run. She has been a teacher in schools and colleges both in Oklahoma and Texas and was curator of the Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum in Canyon, Texas. More recently she has been state director of the Federal Writers' Project in Oklahoma, in which capacity she edited Oklahoma: A Guide to the Sooner State for the American Guide Series.

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