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ization of this type, whether he be the manufacturer in the largest metropolitan center or an agriculturalist in the sparsely settled west. The opportunities for association management of this kind are virtually unlimited.

TEST QUESTIONS
These questions are for the student to use in testing
his knowledge of the assignment. The answers should
be written out, but are not to be sent to the University.

1. What is associated traffic management?

2. How does the work differ from that of a commercial audit bureau?

3. In what ways does the work of an associated traffic manager resemble that of the industrial traffic man?

4. What persons can be secured as clients of an associated traffic manager?

5. What methods of compensation have been devised for such a traffic association ?

6. What are the advantages of each plan?

7. How do these bureaus handle correspondence with the carriers ?

8. Are traffic opportunities confined to large cities!

THE TRAFFIC FIELD

PART III

COMMUNITY TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT

J. P. HAYNES

Traffic Commissioner,
Sioux City Commercial Club,

Sioux City, Ia.

THE TRAFFIC FIELD

PART III

COMMUNITY TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT

Introduction Historical Antecedents-Commercial Asso-
ciations-Development-Federation-Purpose Transporta-
tion for the City-Competition of Localities—Coöperation
in Rate Adjustment-Qualifications of Traffic Commis-
sioner-Organization and Control-Methods of Operation-
Equipment Object and Function—Types of Service
Methods of Financing-Buffalo-Rochester-Syracuse.

INTRODUCTION

an

The type of organization usually known as "association of commerce," "chamber of commerce, or "merchants' exchange” of a given locality, furnishes a field for community traffic management. Too often, such an organization is only a social club. Its rooms, on one of the main streets, are equipped with comfortable lounging chairs, one or more billiard or pool tables, a more or less complete library, and copies of such publications as The Illustrated London News, Life, and Judge.

The organization has no definite program or constructive policy, and failure to put before its membership local problems worthy of consideration accounts, as a rule, for its natural death, notwithstanding the enthusiasm which may have attended its establishment. The appellation “business men's club," "chamber of

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