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Interstate Commerce Commission made as of October 14, 1912.

This has a salutory effect upon the investigation by the carrier. The claim is investigated with the utmost dispatch and reparation made to the claimant as soon as possible, in order to reduce the amount of interest to be paid the claimant.

FILING DEVICES

For the accommodation of claims held in abeyance, that is, those which are under investigation and on which correspondence is continued, ordinary vertical letter files are recommended.

A single tier or so of three drawers should suffice to accommodate the requirements of the claim department of even a large organization and be sufficient for some little time to come. Should the necessity for additional space become apparent, this can be provided by procuring additional units of the same size and construction.

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To measure the efficiency of the department in the recovery of amounts involved in claims, various forms of claim registers are available, but no one form can be recommended as adequate for all purposes. The following suggestion, however, will suffice in the majority of cases and in form it may be a bound book to suit the individual case or requirements or, preferably, one of the many loose-leaf devices available.

Fig. 27 provides vertical columns to show the industrial claim number; the carrier against whom the claim

Claim Registet.

Way

Bill Shipment

Shipped No.

Car Number

Consignor

City

Claim
No.

Carrier

Nature

of
Claim

Date

Original Point Date of

Description

of Shipment

Weight

Rate

Charges

Paid

Correct
Charges

Amount

of
Claim

R. R.
Claim
No.

File Disposition
Ņo.

Remarks

FIG. 27.-A Claim Register

is made; the carrier's claim number; the date on which the claim was filed; the kind of claim-overcharge, loss, or damage; the amount of the claim; the disposition of the claim-paid or declined; and the date on which the investigation was concluded, or payment received.

In passing, it should be stated that the form indicated in Fig. 27 is somewhat condensed and the columns, or. at least some of them, particularly those headed Consignor," "City,” “Description of Shipment," would have to be somewhat wider to accommodate the information that might have to be shown therein.

This form is a daily register and can be added to as the occasions may warrant without disturbing the previous records of claims.

The footings appearing on the bottom of the sheet enable the industry to carry forward, from sheet to sheet, the number of claims and the amount involved so that the financial status of the department can be determined at any time.

Plan of Index

The territorial plan of index is recommended for use in connection with the overcharge or loss and damage claim. A shipment consigned to James Noble, Hopkinsville, Ky., would be indexed as indicated in Fig. 28.

KENTUCKY

Date of Destination Consignee Shipment Hopkinsville James Noble

1-22 Louisville H. H. Mudge

1-30 Covington N. J. Doble

2-20 Ashland National Steel Co. 3-4

Kind of

Claim
Claim

Carrier Number
Loss
Ill. Cent.

C-14133
Overcharge Lou. & Nash, C-17147
Damage C. C. C. & St. L. C-18160
Overcharge C. & O.

C-18176

FIG. 28.-Claim Index

VOCATIONAL TRAINING Both overcharge and loss and damage investigators should be encouraged to take courses of training in traffic work and in legal procedure to bring to them a fuller realization of what is required in the discharge of their duties, and to develop such latent talent as they possess.

Periodical statements should be drawn off indicating the volume of business handled in the department so that the efficient and worthy may be rewarded.

CHAPTER X

SERVICE DIVISION

Bills of Lading—Various Forms-Shipping Receipts—Rates
-Routes-Drafts — Manifests — Export Licenses — Filing
Records—Index Systems—Car Order Clerk-Ordering
Cars: Forms—Car Record Book-Record Movements-
Daily Record.

This chapter contemplates an exemplification of certain phases of the work of the industrial traffio department too limited in their scope to require an extended discussion. For the purpose of maintaining the balance of the chapter, they are grouped under this general head.

BILLS OF LADING

Various shipping forms are used to establish delivery to the carrier, and to furnish the carrier with the necessary shipping instructions, information as to the consignee, his address, and the route to employ.

The form most generally used is the so-called "bill of lading,” which is quite ably treated in a textbook, The Bill of Lading, by Mr. F. A. Larish, of the Western Freight Traffic Association, and published by LaSalle Extension University, Chicago.

As applied to rail carriage, bills of lading fall into two classes—the order form and the straight form. Each of these forms in turn is arranged in pads containing four sets of the bill of lading: (1) the original bill

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