Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

DIAGRAMS.

REM.--The office of an Element in a Sentence, determines its position in the Diagram, according to the following

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][merged small][subsumed][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][subsumed][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

RULE 1.—The Principal Elements of a Sentence are placed uppermost, and on the same horizontal line;-as (1), (2), (3), Diagrams (a) and (B).

RULE 2.—The Subject of a Sentence takes the first place ;-—as, (1) and (10), Diagrams (A), and (1), (6), and (25) B.

RULE 3.—The Predicate of a Sentence is placed to the right of the Subject-attached;-as, (2), and (11), A, and (2), (7), (11), and (26), B.

RULE 4.-The Object of a Sentence is placed to the right of the Predicate—attached ;-as, (3), A, and (3), (12), and (x) B.

RULE 5.—An Adjunct of a Sentence is placed beneath the Word which it limits or modifies-attached; as, (4), (5), (6), (7), (12), (13), (14), (17), (18); (23), A, and (4), (5), (8), (9), (17), (18), (19), (20), (23), (24), B.

RULE 6.—If the Adjunct is a Phrase, its Leader is attached to the Word which it limits ;--as, (15), (19), (25), A, and (15), (21), B.

RULE 7.-If the Adjunct is a Sentence, it is attached by a line to the Word which the Adjunct Sentence limits; as, the Adjunct Sentence within the dotted line (6), is attached by the line from (2), to (9), A, and (6 to 19 inclusive) is attached to (1), B.

RULE 8.-A Logical Adjunct is placed beneath the Word which it describes, but not attached. [See page 39.]

RULE 9.-The Subsequent of a Phrase is placed to the right of its Leader-attached;-as, (20 and 21), to the right of (19),—(26), to the right of (25),—(16) of (15) A, and (22) of (21),(16), of (15) B.

RULE 10.-A Conjunction used to introduce a Sentence, is placed above the Predicate of the Sentence which it introduces;-as, (a), used to introduce the Sentence (1, 2, 3), A, and (9), introducing the Adjunct Sentence (10, 11), (A), and () introducing the Sentence (1, 2, 3), B.

RULE 11.-A Conjunction used to connect Words, Phrases, or Sentences, similar in construction, is placed between the Elements connected > -as, (10), connecting (11) to (7), B. [See also Diagram, page 41.]

RULE 12.-A Relative Pronoun or a Possessive Adjective used to introduce an Adjunct Sentence, is attached to the "antecedent" by a line ;-as (6) attached to (1) and (x) attached to (22) B.

CLASSIFICATION OF SENTENCES.

REMARKS. --Some Sentences assert the being, condition, or state of a person or of a thing—or an act which does not pass over to an Object.

Others assert acts which terminate on an Object.
Some Sentences assert but one fact—others assert more than one.

Some assert an Independent or a Principal Proposition-others a secondary or qualifying proposition. Hence, PRIN.-Sentences are distinguished as

Intransitive or Transitive,
Simple or. Compound,

Principal or Auciliary. DEF. 43.-An Intransitive Sentence is a Sentence that asserts.condition, being, or stateor an act which does not terminate on an Object.

EXAMPLES

1. William sleeps.

4. God is love. 2. Errors abound.

5. Mountains are elevated. 8. Mary is cheerful.

6. Fishes swim.
7. On some fond breast the parting soul relies.”
8. “Now fades the glimmering landscape on the sight.”
9. “Satyrs and sylvan boys were seen,

Peeping from forth their valleys green.”

[blocks in formation]

Ons.--An Intransitive Sentence contains one or more Suluje Predicatez-uri Olejcet.

DEF. 44.--A Transitive Sentence is a Sentence that
asserts an act which terminates on an Object.
EXAMPLES.—1. Virtue secures happiness.

2. Industry promotes health and wealth.
3. “I thank thee, Roderick, for the word.”
4. “The King of Shadows loves a shining mark."
5. “And the eye and the heart hailed its beautiful forms."

And

(

099

thank

tbee

[blocks in formation]

for

[blocks in formation]

Roderic

word the

OBS.-A Transitive Sentence has at least one Subject, one Predicate, and one Object.

DEF. 45.-A Simple Sentence is a Sentence that asserts
but one proposition.
EXAMPLES.—1. William sleeps.

2. Mary is cheerful.
3. Virtue secures happiness.
4. “Now fades the glimmering landscape on the sight."
7. “The King of Shadows loves a shining mark.”

[blocks in formation]

OBS.-A Simple Sentence can have but one Subject, one Predicata and-when Transitive-one Object.

DEF. 46.- A Compound Sentence is a Sentence that
asserts more than one proposition.
EXAMPLES.-1. Anna and Mary study Latin.

2. Temperance elevates and enno lles man.
3. Robert studies Grammar and Arithmetic.
4. “Slowly and sadly they climb the distant mountain,

And read their doom in the setting sun.”

[merged small][ocr errors]

Nar

[ocr errors]

Warner

[ocr errors]

DEF. 46 (6).—In a Compound Sentence, the Principal
Elements which are compounded, are called Clauses.
Obs.—The Compound clauses may be,
study Grammar 1. The Subjects only, Warner and Arthur

study Grammar.
Grammar

2. The Predicates only-Warner studies

and recites Grammar.

3. The Objects only Warner studies
Warner
studies

Grammar and Arithmetic.
4. The Subjects and the Predicates— War.

ner and Arthur study and recite

Grammar.

5. The Subjects and the Objects Warner study

and Arthur study Grammar and

Arithmetic.
6. The Predicates and the Objects—War-

ner studies and recites Grammar and

Arithmetic.
7. The Subjects, the Predicates, and the

Objects— Warner and Arthur study

and recite Grammar and Arithmetic. OBs.-A Compound Sentence may have more than two clauses.

[ocr errors]

Warner

EXAMPLES.

Friendship

Friendship, Love, and Truth abound. (x) Love

abound “Oxygen, Carbon, Hydrogen, and Nitrogen T&

constitute the chief elements of organized Truth

matter." Rem.-Sentences which have Compound Predicates, often have Objects applicable to only a part of them. Hence,

DEF. 46 (c).-A Compound Sentence, having one or more Transitive, and one or more Intransitive Predicates, is called a Mixed Sentence.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]
« AnteriorContinuar »