Darwin's Impact: Social Evolution in America, 1880-1920, Volumen1

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Frank X. Ryan
A&C Black, 2001 M06 15 - 1100 páginas
"These books make available, for the first time in striking juxtaposition, much of the rich and remarkable American response to the idea of social evolution. Professor Ryan has succeeded in producing a selection of the best work in the field. The volumes are balanced, intellectually deep and as relevant and fascinating today as they were a hundred years ago. Ryan deserves high praise for re-acquainting us with these lost treasures."
--John Lachs

Although Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection stunned the halls of biology, anthropology, and religion, its most profound repercussion in America was "Social Darwinism." Beginning in the 1880s, William Graham Sumner and his successors pushed "survival of the fittest" beyond biology to justify power, wealth, and even racial and gender superiority. Theodore Roosevelt and Stephen B. Luce championed military expansionism on Darwinian grounds, and eugenicist Charles B. Davenport urged selective breeding to propagate the strong and eradicate the physically and mentally infirm. Despite its widespread popularity, after the turn of the century Social Darwinism was challenged by a growing rank of philosophers, sociologists, and economists who argued that the movement thrived on bigotry and bad science. By the 1920s the countermovement led by Lester F. Ward, John Dewey, Charles H. Cooley, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and Thorstein Veblen had proven itself the "fitter" of the two.

This three-volume set features more than sixty indispensable essays from 1880 to 1920, most of which have never been anthologized and are now scarce. Volume 1: Social Darwinism and its Critics offers William Graham Sumner's classic defense of Social Darwinism and its criticism from sociologists and philosophers such as Lester F. Ward, James Mark Baldwin, Charles H. Cooley, Jacob Gould Schurman, John Dewey, and Arthur M. Lewis. Volume 2: Race, Gender, and Supremacy rekindles the volatile clash over issues of race, gender, eugenics, and American supremacy, from authors including Nathaniel S. Shaler, Lydia Kingsmill Commander, Charles B. Davenport, Charles A. Ellwood, Theodore Roosevelt, Franz Boas, Edward A. Ross, and Charles H. Cooley. Volume 3: Evolution, Law, and Economics explores the impact of evolution on theories of natural law and economics, including pieces from William Graham Sumner, Thomas Nixon Carver, Andrew Carnegie, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Louis D. Brandeis, Simon Nelson Patten, and Thorstein Veblen.

--more than 60 articles, tracing the impact of Darwinism on sociology, psychology, race, gender, eugenics, law and economics in the USA
--all material reset and indexed, with a new introduction to each volume



 

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Thomas Nixon Carver Law and Government
12
Oliver Wendell Holmes Natural Law 1918
39
John Jacob Astor extracts from A Historical Sketch of the World
55
R Henderson Business Men and Social Theorists
67
Brandeis Big Business and Industrial Liberty 1912
85
John B Clarke The Elements of Social Service
103
Simon Nelson Patten extract from The Theory of Dynamic
138
Simon Nelson Patten Pragmatism and Social Science
161
Thorstein Veblen On the Nature of Capital
185
Charles Horton Cooley Political Economy and Social Process
203
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