Extraordinary Circumstances: The Seven Days Battles

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Indiana University Press, 2001 - 524 páginas

The Seven Days Battles was the first campaign in the Civil War in which Robert E. Lee led the Army of Northern Virginia. Listed by J. F.C. Fuller as one of the 51 decisive military campaigns in Western history, the Seven Days were fought in the area southeast of the Confederate capital of Richmond from June 25 to July 1, 1862. Lee and his fellow officers, including 'Stonewall' Jackson, James Longstreet, A. P. Hill, and D. H. Hill, pushed George B. McClellan's Army of the Potomac from the gates of Richmond to the James River. Along the way, Lee lost several opportunities to harm McClellan severely, but the Union forces, marching all night and fighting during the day, managed to reach safety.

The Seven Days has been the subject of a number of fine historical treatments, but none more detailed and engaging than Brian K. Burton's closely observed account. Extraordinary Circumstances is a moment-by-moment story of the campaign that lifted Southern spirits, began Lee's ascent to fame, and almost prompted European recognition of the Confederacy. The Seven Days also began a string of events leading to the Emancipation Proclamation and the shift toward total war. McClellan's defeat meant that his dream of bringing the United States together as it was before the outbreak of the war was gone forever, and the country's very nature changed as a result.

"Few of those Federals were ready. James Miller of the 2nd Delaware had seen a Southerner climb a tree. Miller pointed out the man just before the shelling started, and perhaps those within earshot were the only ones who knew something was up. The firing caught Baldy Smith dressing after his bath. Overcoming the shock and opening the door of the outhouse he had used, Smith saw Jackson's guns almost literally filling the air with shot and shell. The general tried to get his groom to bring his best horse, but he soon found that the groom had taken the animal and skedaddled. Neither would be seen for two days. An Englishman who was Smith's servant at the time coolly saddled another horse, by which time Smith had hurriedly finished dressing 'leaving his watch behind.'

 

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The Seven Days campaign is Robert E. Lee's most audacious gamble. At the gates of Richmond in June 1862, in a desperate measure of a Napoleonic manoeuvre sur les derrières, Lee caught the "little ... Leer comentario completo

Contenido

The Nation Has Been Making Progress
1
How Are We to Get at Those People?
2
You Have Done Your Best to Sacrifice This
8
It Was a Very Tedious Tiresome March
20
Lees plan as given in General Orders no 75
25
How Are We to Get at Those People?
27
The Responsibility Cannot Be Thrown on My Shoulders
41
Charging Batteries Is Highly Dangerous
58
He Has Other Important Duty to Perform
194
Troop movements June 291862
196
Why Those Men Are Rebels
212
Savage Station June 291862
215
Weve Got Him
230
He Rose and Walked Off in Silence
249
White Oak Swamp and Bracketts June 301862
252
I Thought I Heard Firing
264

Little Powell Will Do His Full Duty Today
82
A P Hills attacks Gainess Mill June 271862
96
Were Holding Them but Its Getting Hotter and Hotter
100
Ewells attacks Gainess Mill June 271862
105
I Have a Regiment That Can Take It
117
Final assaults on Sykess line Gainess Mill June 271862
119
Final assaults on Morells line Gainess Mill June 271862
126
You Have Done Your Best to Sacrifice This Army
138
His Only Course Seemed to Me Was to Make for James River
153
Troop movements June 281862
159
Garuett s or Goldings Farm June 281862
172
But What Do You Think? Is the Enemy in Large Force?
178
Lees plan for June 291862
181
Longstreets assaults Glendale June 301862
277
It Is Nothing When You Get Used to It
281
We Had Better Let Him Alone
306
Press Forward Your Whole Line and Follow
324
General Magruder Why Did You Attack?
341
It Was a Very Tedious Tiresome March
365
Under Ordinary Circumstances the Federal Army Should
386
Appendix A Union and Confederate Troop Strengths
401
McClellans June 28 Telegram to Stanton
407
Notes
421
Bibliography
473
Index
499

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Acerca del autor (2001)

Brian K. Burton is Associate Professor of Management and Director of the MBA program at Western Washington University.

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