Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB
[graphic][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

The following is the description at Burton-on-Trent-"On looking up, I perceived a globe, at least four times as large as Jupiter appears to the naked eye, of a pale blue colour, and of an intense light. It fell vertically through an arch of about fifteen degrees, and vanished, emitting during its passage four or five balls of crimson red light. The pale blue light of the meteor was most brilliant, and, contrasted with the

red balls emitted from it, produced one of the most gorgeous . sights it has ever been my fortune to witness.”

At Blyth (Northumberland), Mr. M. W. Bullen describes the flakes of crimson red light as pear-shaped drops left behind, as if from a molten body."

At Preston the meteor appeared "as a ball of fire about half the size of the moon, followed by a brilliantly red and fiery train of a more permanent and fixed appearance than usual. The nucleus emitted a blue purple light of a flickering and glaring character, as if the ascensional tendency of flame were impeding its descent towards the earth." At Selkirk the meteor was described as

“round and large, looking like the moon descending with a waving motion behind a bank of clouds.”

At Parkhill, near Inverness, it "vanished in a vertical direction amid a shower of apparently falling fragments, which at the same instant assumed a deep red colour."

At Howden, near Hull, it was "a nucleus of brilliant light descending quite vertically in a momentary transit to the earth. When in appearance it touched the earth it exploded like a shell from a mortar. The fragments were of a most brilliant red, but no tinge of blue was observed.”

The explosion appeared to Mr. R. Sutcliffe, at Idle, near Bradford, like the discharge of a rocket, burst before him at the distance of a few hundred yards, altogether unlike an ordinary meteor or falling star. The lights seemed purple and blue and white.

а

a

[ocr errors]

At Ledbury it." gradually descended in a perpendicular direction, emitting bright sparks as it fell.”

At Stretford, near Manchester, the two flashes of the meteor (the second brighter than the first) drew the attention of the observer, who turned about in time to see them falling,

purple and yellow balls of light which illuminated the country for a few seconds, and disappeared.”

The two flashes were seen at Liverpool by Mr. F. J. Bailey, in a place where high buildings obstructed the view of the meteor, “ immediately succeeding each other, of a blue tint, similar to the blue-light in colour, and lasting some five or six seconds, passing from the N.W. to the N.E., not far from the situation of the polar star.”

Mr. A. Brothers writes from his observatory in Manchester—"While observing a Andromedæ about 30 minutes past the meridian, through a telescope of 53 inches aperture, with a power of 30, I distinctly saw two explosions as the meteor seemed to cross the field of the telescope. The light was more brilliant on the west than on the east side, but the effect was so instantaneous that it is not easy to say what was really seen. Of these facts I am certain-the meteor burst twice, and the colour of the light was blue.”

An observer at Little Horton, Bradford, "walking in the open air, was startled by the sudden light. On looking up, the meteor remained in sight three seconds, and disappeared in a coruscation of light formed of the brightest hues."

Mr. W. E. Buck, of Hastings, avers that the meteor was of the same brightness from first to last, but shot or exploded three different times, “that is to say, when first observed, and twice afterwards (see fig. 2). At each of these explosions the brilliant nucleus appears to have been enveloped in red flakes and debris of the shock,” for an observer at Chesterfield writes" The meteor appeared first as a large white ball, then it changed to red, then white or green, and before it was

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

extinguished red again.” He adds," I saw the meteor of the 8th December, 1861, and it was quite similar to this one. The meteor of that date suffered two dismemberments of its body into red masses, and expansions of its light, the first at fifty miles over Lancaster, where a powerful report succeeded, the second at forty miles above the Irish sea, where the meteor disappeared." A writer at Hale, near Manchester, does not particularize any changes of form after the illumination attracted his attention to the object—"The nucleus was white and its train purplish red. It emitted sparks like those from a blacksmith's anvil.”

At Kingstown, County Dublin, Ireland, “a ball of blue flame with a long feathery tail of fire, extending behind and upwards, lit up the eastern sky for several seconds like a broad flash of sheet-lightning. It finally emitted some brilliant sparks and descended into the sea."

At Douglas, Isle of Man, “the shape was that of a broadheaded spear, the blade of which, of pale green flame, was equal to the apparent diameter of the moon in length, and about half that extent in apparent breadth. The part next to it, say the shaft, was of a deep red, continued in a chain of flame of the colour of ordinary gas-light. The whole appearance occupied about the time which would be taken by a common rocket to exhaust itself.” No explosion was heard, and no mention is here made of changes of form or brilliancy of the meteor.

According to the account of Mr. W. G. Drysdale, at Liverpool, before mentioned, “the meteor at first assumed the form of a large bright star and fell rapidly some distance through the atmosphere. Its motion was then suddenly arrested, and it burst forth into a dazzling pale blue light, so large and intense as to cast a strong shadow from objects on the earth. From this magnificent centre a pendant ran down, terminating in a ball of lurid red, like an ear-ring of fire. "The meteor appears,

« AnteriorContinuar »