From Cranmer to Sancroft: Essays on English Religion in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries

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Bloomsbury Publishing, May 16, 2007 - 292 pages
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Patrick Collinson is the leading historian of English religion in the years after the Reformation. This collection of essays ranges from Thomas Cranmer, who was burnt at the stake after repeated recantations in 1556, to William Sancroft, the only other post-Reformation archbishop of Canterbury to have been deprived of office. Patrick Collinson's work explores the complex interactions between the inclusive and exclusive tendencies in English Protestantism, focusing both on famous figures, such as John Foxe and Richard Hooker, and on the individual reactions of lesser figures to the religious challenges of the time. Two themes throughout are the importance of the Bible and the emergence of Puritanism inside the Church of England.
 

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Contents

1 Thomas Cranmer and the Truth
1
The Roots of Dissent
25
The Pastoral Ministry in PostReformation England
45
4 England and International Calvinism 15581640
75
Polemics and Polarities in Early SeventeenthCentury English Culture
101
6 Sects and the Evolution of Puritanism
129
7 The English Conventicle
145
A Retiring Disposition in a Revolutionary Age
173
Notes
201
Index
253
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About the author (2007)

Patrick Collinson is Regius Professor of Modern History, Emeritus, in the University of Cambridge, and a Fellow of Trinity College. He is the author of The Elizabethan Puritan Movement and two earlier collections of essays, Godly People and Elizabethans.

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