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Experiment stations are now maintained at State College in agriculture, engineering and mining, and the investigational work is being constantly published in the form of bulletins.

A Summer Session for Teachers was established in 1910 and the summer enrollment for 1921 was almost 2,000. Many special courses are given during the summer. such as a two-weeks' course for school directors; a course for Continuation School Teachers ; etc.

The college property, embracing about 1800 acres of land and 50 buildings, is valued at $3,674,780. About 200 acres are appropriated for campus purposes and the remainder devoted to agricultural experiments and the maintenance of college livestock; this stock is also used for experimental purposes.

The principal buildings erected by appropriations made by the State Legislature are: The Engineering Buildings; the Agricultural Buildings; the Chemistry Buildicgs; the Mining Buildings; the Liberal Arts Buildings; the Home Economics Building; and the Armory. From private benefactions have been constructed the Carnegie Library and the Schwab Auditorium.

An intercollegiate athletic field of 18 acres and an intra-mural athletic field of 80 acres, supply unusual play-ground facilities and under the mass athletic system in vogue at the college, almost every student takes part in some form of athletic exercise.

The various schools and departments into which the college is divided and the courses of study offered in each are shown in the following schedule:

Major Courses. Each of these courses requires four years for completion, each Jear being divided into two semesters of about equal length.

1. School of Agriculture.-Courses in Agricultural Education; Agronomy, Animal Husbandry, Botany, Chemical Agriculture, Dairy Husbandry, Forestry. Horticulture, Landscape Architecture and Poultry Husbandry.

2. School of Engineering.--Courses in Architecture, Architectural Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Electro-chemical Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Milling Engineering, Railway Mechanical Engineering, and Sanitary Engineering.

3. School of the Liberal Arts.-A Classical Course; courses in Commerce and Finance, Education and Psychology, Modern Languages and Literature, Mathematics, and History and Political Science (Pre-Legal).

4. School of Mines.-Courses in Metallurgical Engineering, Mining Engineering, and Mining Geology.

5. School of Natural Science.-Courses in Chemistry, Industrial Chemistry, Natural Science, Physics and Preparatory to Medicine.

6. Department of Home Economics.--Courses in Domestic Art, Domestic Science, and Vocational Home Economics.

7. Department of Military Science and Tactics.-A course incorporated in all the schools.

8. Department of Physical Education.-A course incorporated in all of

the schools.

Minor or Short Courses.Besides the regular four year courses, a number of short courses are offered by the different schools, as follows:

1. A two years' Course in Agriculture.
2. Winter Courses in Agriculture of twelve weeks each.

8. Correspondence Courses in Agriculture and Home Economics tn 37 different subjects.

4. A one weeks' Lecture Course for Farmers.

5. A six weeks' Summer Course in Practical Coal Mining.

6. A two weeks' Summer Course in Industrial Organization and Mangament.

7. One and two year Courses in Industrial Education for Teachers in the Trades and Industries.

8. Correspondence Courses in Engineering for college credit and non-credit Courses in Practical Engineering Subjects.

9. Winter Courses in Home Economics of twelve weeks each. During the Summer Session of eight weeks, regular college credit work is given while, in addition, many special courses of several weeks' duration form part of the Summer Session work.

ENROLLMENT OF STUDENTS, 1921-1922.

Men. Women. Total. Candidates for Advanced Degrees

119 13 132

132

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Students in Engineering Extension Classes in manufacturing centers
Students in Educational Extension Classes in cities and towns
Students in Mining Extension Classes in coal mining towns
Students in Correspondence Courses

7,000 2,500

700 3,620

STATE FOREST ACADEMY, MONT ALTO, FRANKLIN COUNTY.
Director and Professor of Forestry-Major Edwin A. Ziegler, A. M., Ske. D.
Professor of Forestry-Willard M. Drake, A. B., M. S. F.
Professor of Forestry--George S. Perry, B. F.
Assistant Professor of Forestry-W. Harold Horning, B. F.

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Professor of Biology-Coleman J. Harris, A. M., M. S.
Professor of Soils and Chemistry--Roland W. Brown, B.S.
Instructor in Forestry-Louis C. Loetzer, B. F.

The Pennsylvania State Forest Academy was founded by Dr. J. T. Rothrock. the first Commissioner of Forestry, in response to a need for the preparation of fcresters to administer the State Forests. It was established under the provisions of the Act of May 13, 1903, P. L. 373, and is administered by the Department of Forestry. Three classes of Students are enrolled, (1) scholarship, (2) Federal rocational, (3) non-scholarship. Scholarships are open to residents of Pennsylvania between the ages of 17 and 25 years who pass a competitive examination, held annually. Facilities permitting, ex-servce men under the jurisdiction of the Federal Board for Vocational Education and non-scholarship students who meet the necessary qualifications for entrance are accepted. The instruction of Federal Vocational and non-scholarship students is without expense to the State. In 1921, 9 echolarship students, 11 ex-service men, and 6 non-scholarship students were accepted. The enrollment by classes is (December 31, 1921):

7

Class of 1922–3 year course
Class of 1923—no graduates
Class of 1924-4 year course
Class of 1925-4 year course

10

22

39

Students at graduation receive the degree of Bachelor of Forestry.

In order to meet the increasing requirements of the profession, the curriculum at the Academy was revised, effective September, 1920, in accordance with the recommendation of a committee on forest education appointed by the State Forest Commission. The change included the adoption of a four-year course instead of a three-year course.

In addition to the instructional work at the Academy, the District Forester and his assistants administer approximately 22,000 acres of State Forest land in the Mont Alto District, and the Department nursery at that point. This plan affords an unexcelled opportunity for the students to acquire practical knowledge of forest work.

The appropriation for the Academy for the biennial period 1921-1923 was $40,000.00

SALARIES OF STATE OFFICERS AND EMPLOYES.

THE LEGISLATURE.

Senators and Members of the House of Representative each receive $2,500 for regular biennial sessions, and mileage to and from their homes at the rate of thirty cents per mile circular; for a special or extraordinary session they receive $500, and mileage, as aforesaid. In addition to the above they are given $150 in postage for each regular session, and $50 for each special or extraordinary session. The Pres dent pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives, in add'tion to their salaries as members of the Legislature, each receives $1,000 for each regular biennial session, and $500 for each special or extraordinary session.

The clerk and the stenographer to the President of the Senate receive, respectively, $1,500 and $1,200 per annum.

The Secretary of the Senate receives $7,500 per annum; the chief clerks of the Senate and House of Representatives, each receive $6,000 per annum ; the librarian of the Senate and the resident clerk of the House of Representatives each receives $4.500 per annum; the assistant librarian of the Senate and the assistant resident clerk of the House of Representatives each receives $3,600 per annum.

The assistant clerks of the Senate and House of Representatives each receives $2,000 for each regular biennial session, $10 per diem for each special or extraordinary session, and $175 per month during the interim between legislative sessions.

The journal and reading clerks of the Senate and House of Representatives each receives $2,000 for each regular biennial session, and $10 per dem for each special or extraordinary session.

The executive clerk of the Senate, the assistant journal clerks of the Senate and House of Representatives, the desk clerks and assistant reading clerks of the House of Representatives each receives $1,800 for each regular biennial session, and $10 per diem for each special or extraordinary session.

The assistant to the secretary of the Senate receives $10 per diem for each regular biennial, special or extraordinary session, and $200 per month during the interim between legislative sessions. The stenographers to the librarian of the Senate and the stenographer to the resident clerk of the House of Representatives each receives $8 per diem for each regular biennial, special or extraordinary session, and $150 per month during the interim between legislative sessions. The superintendents of the store rooms of the Senate and House of Representatives each receives $2,400 per annum.

For each regular biennial. special or extraordinary session, the message clerks, the clerks having in charge the preparation of the Senate and House Histories of Legislation, and the sergeants-at-arms of the Senate and House of Representatives cach receives $8 per diem; for each regular biennial, special or extraordinary session, the clerks in the transcribing rooms, clerks to committees, chaplains, clerks to President pro tempore and Speaker, postmasters, chief assistant sergeants-at-arms, stenographers to the President pro tempore and Speaker, stenographers to the chief clerks of the Senate and House of Representatives, superintendents of folding rooms, and the assistant sergeants-at-arms each receives $7 per diem; for each regular biennial, special or extraordinary session, the assistant postmasters, messengers, assistant messengers, pasters and folders, the custodians of committee rooms, and the custodian of the wash room of the House of Representatives, each receives $6 per diein; the messenger in the Senate Library and the messenger in the library of the House of Representatives each receives $1,200 per annum; the custodian of the Senate Chamber and the custodian of the Hall of the House of Representatives, the watchmen of both Houses, the custodian of the wash room of the Senate, the custodian of the basement of the Senate, and the custodian of the basement of the House of Representatives each receives $150 per month; for each regular biennial, special or extraordinary sess on, the assistant custodians of the Senate Chamber and the assistant custodians of the Hall of the House of Representatives each receives $3 per diem, and $75 per month during interim between legislative sessions; for each regular biennial, special or extraordinary session, the page to the President and the page to the President pro tempore, the page to the Speaker, and the chief pages each receives $3 per diem; and the pages each receives $2 per diem.

In addition to the officers and employes above specified, the chief clerk of the Senate is authorized to appoint, for the session, not more than four stenographers for the use of the members and officers of the Senate, and the chief clerk of the House of Representatives is anthorized to appoint, for the session, not more than six stenographers for the use of the members and officers of the House of Representatives, who shall each receive $5 per diem.

In the Senate and House of Representatives for each regular biennial, special or extraordinary session, and until the proceedings of the Legislative Journal shall be fully transcribed and completed, the filing clerks each receives $7 per diem; the compiling clerks each receives $9 per diem ; the chief official reporters each receives $18 per diem; the official reporters each receives $15 per diem; the expert typewriters each receives $7 per diem; the proofreaders and the copyholders each receives $7 per diem, and until the proceedings of the Journal are proofread, and also for the time employed on the appendix and index. The clerk to index the Legislative Journal receives $1,500 per session, and the clerk in the office of the Superintendent of Public Printing and Binding receives $7 per diem until the proceedings of the Journal shall have been delivered to the printer, and the sum of $150 per month thereafter until the Legislative Journal, appendix and index have been completed and measured.

All officers and employes of the General Assembly, including the employes on the legislative journal, shall return, as such, to the next regular biennial session o the Legislature following that for which they were elected or appointed, and those who shall not be reelected or reappointed, or elected or appointed to some other office in the Legislature, shall be allowed their regular per diem compensation, except the assistant clerks, journal clerks, assistant journal clerks, reading derks. assistant reading clerk, executive clerk, desk clerks, and message clerks, who shall each receive $10 per diem for ten days, or until their successors are duy tlected or appointed and have qualified.

Each of the above officers and employes receives mileage for each regular biennial spec al or extraordinary session of the Legislature, and as returning officers, at the rate of ten cents per mile to and from their homes, to be computed by the ordinary mail route between their homes and the State Capitol.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT.

Governor.
Lieutenant-Governor,
Secretary to the Governor,
Chief clerk,
Clerk to secretary,
Commission clerk,
Four stenographers, each,

Per annum. *$10,000

5.000 7,500 4,000 2,400 1,800 1.500

"After January 16, 1923, the salary of the Governor will be $18,000 per annum.

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