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United States may be a party, at each of the stations above referred to, and shall fix the rates therefor, subject to control of such rates by Congress. At such stations and wherever and whenever shore stations open for general public business between the coast and vessels at sea under the provisions of the Berlin convention of nineteen hundred and six and future international conventions and treaties to which the United States may be a party shall not be so established as to insure a constant service day and night without interruption, and in all localities wherever or whenever such service shall not be maintained by a commercial shore station within one hundred nautical miles of a naval radio station, the Secretary of the Navy shall, so far as is consistent with the transaction of governmental business, open naval radio stations to the general public business described above, and shall fix rates for such service, subject to control of such rates by Congress. The receipts from such radiograms shall be covered into the Treasury as miscellaneous receipts.

SECRECY OF MESSAGES.

Nineteenth. No person or persons engaged in or having knowledge of the operation of any station or stations, shall divulge or publish the contents of any messages transmitted or received by such station, except to the person or persons to whom the same may be directed, or their authorized agent, or to another station employed to forward such message to its destination, unless legally required so to do by the court of competent jurisdiction or other competent authority. Any person guilty of divulging or publishing any message, except as herein provided, shall, on conviction thereof, be punished by a fine of not more than two hundred and fifty dollars or imprisonment for a period of not exceeding three months, or both fine and imprisonment, in the discretion of the court.

PENALTIES.

For violation of any of these regulations, subject to which a license under sections one and two of this Act may be issued, the owner of the apparatus shall be liable to a penalty of one hundred dollars, which may be reduced or remitted by the Secretary of Commerce, and for repeated violations of any of such regulations, the license may be revoked.

For violation of any of these regulations, except as provided in regulation nineteenth, subject to which a license under section three of this Act may be issued, the operator shall be subject to a penalty of twenty-five dollars, which may be reduced or remitted by the Secretary of Commerce, and for repeated violations of any such regulations, the license shall be suspended or revoked.

Interference. SEC. 5. That every license granted under the pro

visions of this Act for the operation or use of apparatus for radio communication shall prescribe that the operator thereof shall not willfully or maliciously interfere with any other radio communication. Such interference shall be deemed a misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof the owner or operator, or both, shall be punishable by a fine of not to exceed five hundred dollars or imprisonment for not to exceed one year, or both.

SEC. 6. That the expression "radio communication” as used in this Act means any system of electrical communication by telegraphy or telephony without the aid of any wire connecting the points from and at which the radiograms, signals, or other communications are sent or

received. False signals.

SEC. 7. That a person, company, or corporation within the jurisdiction of the United States shall not knowingly utter or transmit, or cause to be uttered or transmitted, any false or fraudulent distress signal or call or false or fraudulent signal, call, or other radiogram of any kind. The penalty for so uttering or transmitting a false or fraudulent distress signal or call shall be a fine of not more than two thousand five hundred dollars or imprisonment for not more than five years, or both, in the discretion of the court, for each and every such offense, and the penalty for so uttering or transmitting, or causing to be uttered or transmitted, any other false or fraudulent signal, call, or other radiogram shall be a fine of not more than one thousand dollars or imprisonment for not more than two years, or both, in the discretion of the court, for each and

every such offense. Foreign vessels.

Sec. 8. That a person, company, or corporation shall not use or operate any apparatus for radio communication on a foreign ship in territorial waters of the United States otherwise than in accordance with the provisions of sections four and seven of this Act and so much of section five as imposes a penalty for interference. Save as aforesaid, nothing in this Act shall apply to apparatus for radio communication on any foreign ship.

SEC. 9. That the trial of any offense under this Act shall be in the district in which it is committed, or if the offense is committed upon the high seas or out of the jurisdiction of any particular State or district the trial shall be in the district where the offender may be found or into which he shall be first brought.

SEC. 10. That this Act shall not apply to the Philippine Islands.

SEC. 11. That this Act shall take effect and be in force on and after four months from its passage.

Approved, August 13, 1912. .

LONDON INTERNATIONAL RADIOTELEGRAPHIC CON-
VENTION, PROCLAIMED BY THE PRESIDENT JULY
8, 1913.

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The International Radiotelegraphic Convention was valandon
signed at London July 5, 1912. The convention was rati-
fied by the Senate of the United States on January 22,
1913, with the proviso set forth in the following resolution
of concurrence:

Resolved (two-thirds of the Senators present concurring therein), That
the Senate advise and consent to the ratification of the radiotele-
graphic convention signed at London on July 5, 1912, with the final
protocol and service regulations connected therewith: Provided, That
the Senate advise and consent to the ratification of said convention
with the understanding to be expressed as a part of the instrument of
ratification that nothing in the Ninth Article of the Regulations affixed
to the convention shall be deemed to exclude the United States from
the execution of her inspection laws upon vessels entering in or clear-
ing from her ports.

The London Convention was proclaimed by the President, and took effect July 8, 1913, "to the end that the same and every article and clause thereof may be observed and fulfilled with good faith by the United States and the citizens thereof," and supersedes the Berlin Radiotelegraphic Convention.

The London Convention and Regulations do not modify or repeal the act of August 13, 1912, to regulate radio communication or the acts of June 24, 1910, and July 23, 1912, to require apparatus and operators for radio communication on certain ocean steamers.

INTERNATIONAL RADIOTELEGRAPH CONVENTION,

LONDON, 1912.

[Translation.)

International Radiotelegraph_Convention concluded between

Germany and the German Protectorates, the United States of America and the Possessions of the United States of America, the Argentine Republic, Austria, Hungary, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Belgium, the Belgian Congo, Brazil, Bulgaria, Chile, Denmark, Egypt, Spain and the Spanish Colonies, France and Algeria, French West Africa, French Equatorial Africa, Indo-China, Madagascar, Tunis, Great Britain and the various British Colonies and Protectorates, the Union of South Africa, the Australian Federation, Canada, British India, New Zealand, Greece, Italy and the Italian Colonies, Japan and Chosen, Formosa, Japanese Sakhalin and the leased territory of Kwantung, Morocco, Monaco, Norway, the Netherlands, the Dutch Indies and the Colony of Curacao, Persia, Portugal and the Portuguese Colonies, Roumania, Russia and the Russian Possessions and Protectorates, The Republic of San Marino, Siam, Sweden, Turkey, and Uruguay. The undersigned, plenipotentiaries of the Governments of the countries enumerated above, having met in con

ference at London, have agreed on the following Convention, subject to ratification:

ARTICLE 1.

Scope.

The High Contracting Parties bind themselves to apply the provisions of the present Convention to all radio stations (both coastal stations and stations on shipboard) which are established or worked by the Contracting Parties and open to public service between the coast and vessels at sea.

They further bind themselves to make the observance of those provisions obligatory upon private enterprises authorized either to establish or work coastal stations for radiotelegraphy open to public service between the coast and vessels at sea, or to establish or work radio stations, whether open to general public service or not, on board of vessels flying their flag.

ARTICLE 2.

Coast stations. By “coastal stations" is to be understood every radio

station established on shore or on board a permanently moored vessel used for the exchange of correspondence with ships at sea.

Every radio station established on board any vessel not permanently moored is called a "station on shipboard."

ARTICLE 3.

Intercommuni

The coastal stations and the stations on shipboard shall cation.

be bound to exchange radiograms without distinction of the radio system adopted by such stations.

Every station on shipboard shall be bound to exchange radiograms with every other station on shipboard without distinction of the radio system adopted by such stations.

However, in order not to impede scientific progress, the provisions of the present Article shall not prevent the eventual employment of a radio system incapable of communicating with other systems, provided that such incapacity shall be due to the specific nature of such system and that it shall not be the result of devices adopted for the sole purpose of preventing intercommunication.

ARTICLE 4.

ice.

Limited serv- Notwithstanding the provisions of Article 3, a station

may be reserved for a limited public service determined by the object of the correspondence or by other circumstances independent of the system emlpoyed.

ARTICLE 5.

Each of the High Contracting Parties undertakes to Land-line conconnect the coastal stations to the telegraph system by special wires, or, at least, to take other measures which will insure a rapid exchange between the coastal stations and the telegraph system.

ARTICLE 6.

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The High Contracting Parties shall notify one another of the names of coastal stations and stations on shipboard referred to in Article 1, and also of all data, necessary to facilitate and accelerate the exchange of radiograms, as specified in the Regulations.

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ARTICLE 7.

Each of the High Contracting Parties reserves the right to prescribe or permit at the stations referred to in Article 1, apart from the installation the data of which are to be published in conformity with Article 6, the installation and working of other devices for the purpose of establishing special radio communication without publishing the details of such devices.

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ARTICLE 8.

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The working of the radio stations shall be organized Interference. as far as possible in such manner as not to disturb the service of other radio stations.

ARTICLE 9.

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Radio stations are bound to give absolute priority to calls of distress from whatever source, to similarly answer such calls and to take such action with regard thereto as may be required.

ARTICLE 10.

The charge for a radiogram shall comprise, according Rates. to the circumstances:

1. (a) The coastal rate, which shall fall to the coastal station;

(b) The shipboard rate, which shall fall to the shipboard station.

2. The charge for transmission over the telegraph lines, to be computed according to the ordinary rules.

3. The charges for transit through the intermediate coastal or shipboard stations and the charges for special services requested by the sender.

The coastal rate shall be subject to the approval of the Government of which the coastal station is dependent, and the shipboard rate to the approval of the Government of which the ship is dependent.

55830°-14-2

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