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of valuable historical matter would be brought to light as a result of such action, some part of which should be printed by the Society. At any rate it would seem worth while to appoint a committee to investigate this department and report to the Council the result of such investigation. Notwithstanding this part of the Society's collection is not yet catalogued some use of it has been made by historical students, but a good catalogue would not only make it of more practical value to such students, but add to the reputation of the Society as a place for study and research. William Lincoln made a report for the Council in 1830 in which he refers to the Society's manuscripts as being rare and curious, and urges members to explore their garrets in search of old papers to add to the collection, the response to which undoubtedly added many valuable manuscripts.

The Society has already published from the manuscripts in their possession :

“The Diaries of John Hull, Mint-Master and Treasurer of the Colony of Massachusetts Bay,” with a memoir by Samuel Jennison and notes by Edward E. Hale. Archäologia Americana, Vol. III

"A Short Discourse of a Voyage made in ye yeare of our Lord 1613 to ye late discovered Countrye of Greenland; and a breife discription of ye same countrie, and ye Comodities yer raised to ye Aduenturers.”

This was published by the Antiquarian Society in Vol. IV. of Archæ ologia Americana, with an introduction and notes by Samuel F. Haven. Fifty copies were also printed in separate form.

“Note-Book kept by Thomas Lechford, Esq., Lawyer, in Boston, Massachusetts Bay, from June 27, 1638, to July 29, 1641." Edited by Edward Everett Hale, Jr. With a sketch of the life of Lechford by J. Hammond Trumbull, LL.D. Archæologia Americana, Vol. VII.

"The Diary of Christopher Columbus Baldwin, Librarian of the American Antiquarian Society, 1829-1835, with an introduction and notes by Nathaniel Paine, A.M.,” Worcester, 1901.

The diary of our first president, Isaiah Thomas, is in process of publication, one volume being already in print, and it is expected that the material for the second volume will soon be in the hands of the printer.

Attention is called to the fact that Mrs. Reynolds our Librarian's assistant has prepared for the Alabama Depart

ment of Archives and History, a list of the newspapers printed in the states of Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee, which list has been printed in the Gulf States Historical Magazine. As this list is not likely to come to the notice of many of our members it is suggested that it be printed with the “Proceedings” for their benefit.'

The Collection and Research Fund, so termed since April 1858, founded by the receipt of $5000 from the estate of Isaiah Thomas and now amounting to over $16,000, was given for the purpose of using the income in exploring ancient monuments of this country and to aid in increasing the library and cabinet. It is suggested that as but little of the income has been used in the past for the study and exploration of ancient monuments an appropriation might be made for a special paper to become a part of another volume of the Archæologia Americana.

Reports of the Treasurer and Librarian are now presented only at the Annual Meeting but the Council report both these departments to be in good condition at this time, and that there have been large additions to the library and cabinet. The general appearance of the interior of our building has been greatly improved within the last six months by judicious cleaning and painting by our new janitor.

As the real estate bequeathed to the Society by Mr. Salisbury came into its legal possession immediately after the probating of the will, the income derived therefrom, amounting to about $365 on the first of April, has been credited to the Society by the Executors. This income for the year from the property as it is now rented will amount to a little less than $1000 out of which the taxes and running expenses must be deducted. The Salisbury Mansion lot contains 24,450 square feet and is assessed for about $37,000. While a valuable property, it is not, on account of its location, adapted for building purposes for the Society and it should

This list is given at the close of the report of the Council.

either be sold or exchanged for land more favorably located for our uses. This matter might be put into the hands of our Finance Committee with power to act, if thought expedient by the Society.

The death of our President caused a vacancy on the Library Committee which has been filled by the appointment of MR. WALDO LINCOLN.

Besides that of the President the Council regrets to announce the death of James D. Butler, LL. D., of Madison, Wisconsin, who died November 20, 1905 at the age of 91 years, and of Samuel P. Langley, D. C. L., of Washington, D. C., who died at Aiken, S. C., February 27, 1906, notices of whom will be presented by our biographer.

By the original Act of Incorporation of the Antiquarian Society, which was approved by Gov. Caleb Strong, October 24, 1812, it was provided "that the annual income of any real estate by said Society holden, shall never exceed the sum of fifteen hundred dollars, and that the personal estate thereof, exclusive of books, papers and articles in the Museum of said Society, shall never exceed the value of seven thousand dollars."

In February, 1894, by request of the Society, the following amendment was made to its Act of incorporation:

An act to authorize the American Antiquarian Society to hold additional real and personal estate.

Be it enacted, etc., as follows:

Section 1. The American Antiquarian Society is hereby authorized to hold real and personal estate, in addition to books, papers and articles in its cabinet, to an amount not exceeding five hundred thousand dollars.

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. Approved February 26, 1894.

This act made legal the holding of property heretofore acquired and also provided for expected additions.

Since the passage of this amendment a general law has been enacted: “Revised Laws, Chapter 125, Section 8,"

which provides that “Any corporation organized under general or special laws for any of the purposes mentioned in Section 2 ... (Educational, Charitable, Antiquarian, Historical, Literary or Scientific) may hold real and personal estate to an amount not exceeding one million five hundred thousand dollars . ..."

For the Council,

NATHANIEL PAINE.

NEWSPAPER FILES.

ALABAMA, MISSISSIPPI AND TENNESSEE NEWSPAPER FILES IN THE LIBRARY OF THE AMERICAN ANTIQUARIAN

SOCIETY, WORCESTER, MASS. BLAKELEY.

THE BLAKELEY SUN, and ALABAMA ADVERTISER. S. w.

Mar. 23, 30, 1819.
CAHAWBA.

ALABAMA STATE GAZETTE. W. Apr. 28, May 12, 1825.
CAHAWBA PRESS and ALABAMA INTELLIGENCER. W. July 17, 1819;

July 15, 1820.
CAHAWBA PRESS and ALABAMA STATE INTELLIGENCER. w.

Mar. 19, May 14, 1825.
CLAIBORNE.

ALABAMA COURIER. Mar. 19, Apr. 9, July 9, Aug. 20, 1819.

CLAIBORNE GAZETTE. W. Mar. 19, 1825. DECATUR.

SOUTHERN METEOR. Vol. 2, No. 2, Apr. 1878. EUFAULA.

THE EUFAULA News. Feb. 11, 1868. GADSDEN.

STIFF'S RADICAL REFORMER. W. Dec. 4, 1853-Jan. 21, 1854.

merged into the

RADICAL REFORMER. W. Feb. 25, Mar. 4, 1854. HUNTSVILLE.

HUNTSVILLE Daily INDEPENDENT. July 11, 1867."

ALABAMA REPUBLICAN. W. Apr. 18, 1818; Apr. 3, 1819. MARION.

THE HOWARD COLLEGIAN. m. Aug. 1881. MARION JUNCTION.

THE PRESS. Vol. 1, No. 2, Apr. '76 (amateur) 32°. MOBILE.

MOBILE LITERARY GAZETTE. W. Devoted to Literature, Science,

Morality, and General Intelligence. Aug. 9, 1839.
THE MOBILE MERCANTILE ADVERTISER. S. w. Dec. 18, 22, 1835;

Jan. 5, 29, 1836.
THE WEEKLY MERCURY. Nov. 27, 1865.
MOBILE EVENING News. July 2, 1862; Aug. 20, 1863; May 28,

June 10, 1864.

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