Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB
[ocr errors]

201

221
221
222

[ocr errors]

.

.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

.

[ocr errors]

.

[ocr errors]

Yar Mahommcd Khan

266 The Sepoys at Barrackpore .

The Persians occupy Herat. 267 | The Mutiny of the 19th Regiment
Fresh Arrangements between

at Berhampore.

292

Persia and Britain

268 The Defenceless Condition of

Meerza Khan's Appointment to Bengal

293

Shiraz

269 Mungul Pandy and the 34th

Murray strikes his Flag

269

Regiment.

294

The Persian Manifesto

270 The Sepoys in Umballa

296

The Persian Mission to Constanti. The Sepoys at Lucknow

297

nople

271 The Chupatties

297

The Persian War of 1856 271 The Mutiny at Meerut

298

Its Termination

272 The Mutiny at Delhi

300

The State of India

273 Colvin in the North-West

301

European and Native Troops in Oudh

301

India

274 Its Administration

302

The Native Troops

275 Cawnpore

304

The Services of the Native Army: 276 Nana Sahib.

305

The Mutiny at Vellore in 1806 277 The Rising at Cawnpore

The Mutiny of the 47th Regiment

The Massacre

279 The Sortie from Lucknow, and

The Mutiny of the 34th Regiment the Death of Sir H. Lawrence . 307

at Ferozepore

280 | The Cry for Vengeance

The Mutiny at Rawui Pindee in

The Answer to the Cry

1849.

281 John Lawrence at Lahore

310

The Order of 1844, and its Modi

Anson the Commander-in-Chief 311

fication in 1845

282 Barnard

312

Napier suspends the modified Archdale Wilson :

312

Order of 1845

283 The Fall of Delhi

313

His Controversy with Dalhousie :

284 Lucknow

314

The Refusal of the 38th Regiment

Havelock and Outram:

315

to embark for Burma

285 Colin Campbell

316

Canning's General Service Order

Lucknow finally relieved

317

of 1856

287 Canning's Administration

The Sepoys' Objection to it. 287 The Unpopularity of his Measures 318
Aggravated by the State of The Manifesto of July.

319

Oudh

288 | The Oudh Proclamation

320

The Minié Rifle :

289 The Government of India trans-

The Lascar and the greased

ferred to the Crown .

321

Cartridges

290 The Rule of the Company

322

The Terror of the Sepoys

290 | Its Governors-General .

323

.

.

[ocr errors]

.

[ocr errors]
[blocks in formation]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

HISTORY OF ENGLAND.

CHAPTER XXIV.

THE CRIMEAN WAR.

Russia.

The vast Power which frowns over Eastern Europe, and which for centuries has been extending its possessions and accumulating its resources, has only a difficult and imperfect access to the ocean, the common highway of mankind. Her northern shores are fringed with a frozen sea, her southern limits are lost in the arid wastes of Central Asia. On the north-west and south-west, indeed, two inland seas give her an intermittent or doubtful access to the Western world. But the navigation of the Baltic is annually interrupted by the ice of winter. The navigation of the Bosphorus is at the mercy

of the Power which holds the city of Constantine. Every educated Russian consequently sighs for predominance at the Porte, which is the gate of the Russian Empire.

The forces which would in any circumstances impel the Russians to gravitate towards the Bosphorus are augmented by the condition of European Turkey. A warlike race, of a religion strange to Europe, governed by an autocracy

Turkey. which is at once brutal and feeble, has been encamped for centuries on the soil of the rich provinces which stretch from the Danube on the north to the Greek frontier on the south. The descendants of the former inhabitants of this country, degraded and exhausted by a long course of bad government, sigh for independence and relief. They turn in their distress to Europe for the help which their own right hands

VOL. VI.

A

race.

seem powerless to afford them. Independence they would gladly receive from any Power, but two influences, the strongest among those by which nations are affected, induce them to look especially towards Russia. One large portion of the inhabitants of European Turkey is allied to Russia by ties of

Another large portion is connected with it by ties of faith. The Slave naturally looks to the great Slave Power of Northern Europe for the redress of his grievances, while the Greek regards the Czar of all the Russias as the head of his Church.

Turkey is rarely free from questions of race and religion. As the second half of the nineteenth century commenced, two obscure subjects-one involving race, the other religion-forced

themselves into prominence. The inhabitants of the Montenegro.

little principality-the Black Mountain-have for centuries maintained a desultory warfare against the Turk. In 1852 they resumed their aggressions. The Turk decided on repressing disorder by the occupation of their territory, and entrusted the task to Omar Pacha, a general of repute. In taking this step, the Porte hardly foresaw all the consequences of its decision. Austria, just recovering from the crisis of 1848, was alarmed at the prospect of fresh disorder near her own frontiers. Determined to stop war at any cost, in January 1853 she sent General Count Leiningen to Constantinople, to demand the withdrawal of Omar Pacha. The Porte, alarmed at language which, coming from Austria, was as unaccustomed as it was peremptory, gave way. Omar Pacha was recalled, and the Montenegrin difficulty terminated. 1

Events were, in fact, taking place in Constantinople which made it impossible for the Porte to risk the enmity of Austria. The Holy

Another question, growing in intensity, was agitating

the counsels of the Sultan. The Porte has for centuries possessed the fortunate or unfortunate country which every Christian knows as the Holy Land. In the Middle Ages torrents of blood had been poured out, hoards of treasure

1 Russian Diplomatic Study of the Crimean War, vol. i. pp. 115-117; cf. Kinglake's History of the Crimean War, vol. i. p. 76 seg.

Places.

« AnteriorContinuar »