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iii. 351.

n.

ji. 124.

D'Aubigny, his arrest of Mr. Pritchard, v.

347.
Davenant,

his economical writings, i. 141;
Davidson, a negro, one of the Cato Street

conspirators, i. 437; executed, 440.
Davies, Colonel, wishes to limit the sup-

plies to six months, ii. 439.
Davies, Sir John, his description of Ire-

land, ii. 230
Davis, Charles, assists in editing the

Nation, v. 94 ; character of, 190.
Davy, Sir H., his early career, i. 64, 65,

147; invents the safety lamp, 65, 112;
his opinion on the introduction of gas,
86 n. ; his di-covery of the anæsthetic

properties of nitrous oxide gas, v. 398.
Dawkins, Professor Boyd, his views on

prehistoric man, vi. 366.
Dawson, Rt. Hon. G., his attack on Can-

ning, ii. 361 ; his speech at Derry, 397 ;
his amendment to Graham's motion in

1830, 437 ; his election in 1830, ii. 176.
D'Azeg io, Coulit, v. 379.
D ad Weight, the. See Annuity.
Debt, the National, its amount in 1816,

1. 24, 29, 39; its origin, 26; its rapid
increase, 27, 38; gloomy anticipations
at its increase, 28; Burdett proposes its
repudiation, ii. 109; its repudiation de
manded at county meetings, 119; con-
version of the Navy 5 per cents., 119;
conversion of the 4 per cents., 165 ; con-
version of stock, v. 30; kan of £8,000,000,
172 ; the Irish, 211, 221; formation of
the new 3 and 2) per cent. stocks, 478.

(See also Sinking Fund.)
Debt, imprisonment for, i. 172 n.; arrest

for, iii. 313; arrest and imprisonment
for, iv. 418.
Debtor, elected for Beverley, iii. 313.
Debtors, the law relating to, iv. 418;

prison treatment of, 420 ; the act of 1844,

422.
De Caus, Solomon, his inventions, iii.

253, 262; inventions of, v. 63.
Decazes, Monsieur, Ministry and fall of,
Deccan, attempt to establish a balance of

power in the, vi. 75; geographical

meaning of the term, 81 n.
De Clifford, Lord, bis opinion and vote on

the Q'ieen's trial, ii. 57.
Deeg, battle of, vi. 87.
Defenders, the, in Ireland, ii. 294.
De Ferronay, Monsieur, his retirement,

iii. 16o.
Defoe, his writings, i. 211.
De Grey, Earl, retires from the Lord-

Lieutenancy, v. 116.
De la Cour, M., appointed French am-

bassador at Berlin, vi. 12.
Delegates, Court of Jurisdiction, partly

transferred to Privy Council, iii. 292 n.
Delhi, capture of, by Lake, vi. 85; pro-

hibition of suttee in, 139; the mutiny ai,
299 ; a Mogul emperor set up in, 307;
siege of, 312; fall of, 313.

Deism, English, in the eighteenth century,

v. 247
Dembinski, escapes into Turkey, v. 409.
Demerara, riots in, iii. 397 ; slavery regu-

lated in, 403; number of slaves in, 409
Demont, Louise, her evidence against the

Queen, ii. 53.
Demosthenes, establishes himself at Pylus,
Denman, Thomas (afterwards first Lord),

ii. 31; appointed Attorney-General to the
Queen, 31; his opinion of Alderman
Wood, 33; refuses to allow Mrs. Den-
man to call on the Queen, 38; memor-
able words of, 43; his defence of the
Queen in the Lords, 44; applies descrip-
tion of lago to Leach, 45; at the trial,
49; reception of, at Cheltenham, .51;
his opinion of Brougham's peroration,
52 ; his speech, 55; interrupted in a
speech by prorogation, 59; urges the
Queen's claim to be crowned before
Privy Council, 67 ; his election for Not-
tingham, iii. 176; on Chancery reform,
284; his conduct of the Bankruptcy Bill,
290 and n. ; receives seals of Chancellor
of the Exchequer during interregnum,
iv. 2 n.; joins Useful Knowledge Society,
74; his charge on "Stockdale v. Han-
sard," 198; his attitude in the House of
Lords, 205 ; appointed to try Lord Car-
digan, 437; his condemnation of the
proceedings in O'Connell's trial, v. 109;
vores against the conviction, 110; op-

poses Russell's Sugar Duties Bill, 158.
Dennie, Colonel, attacks Afghans, vi.

190; death of, 192.
Deothul, action at, vi. 109.
De Potter, M., Dutch journalist, iii.

167 ; signs the declaration of Belgian

independence, 170.
Derby, the Brandreth riot at, and the

conviction of the rioters, i. 365-367 ;
corrupt condition of, iv. 38.
Derby, 12th Earl of, opposes Liverpool and

Manchester Railway, iii. 262.
Derby, 14th Earl of (see also Stanley,

Lord), appointed Prime Minister, v.
451 ; his pledge on the corn question,
452; astounded at Disraeli's declara.
tions, 462 ; resigns, 471; his joke on the
constitution of Aberdeen's Cabinet, 472;
fails to form a Ministry in 1855, vi. 51;
condemns Commodore Lambert's seizure
of the Burmese ship, 238 n.; Second

Administration of, 320.
Derbyshire, no contest in, for twenty,

years, i. 119.
De Rigny, Admiral, in command of the

French fleet off Greece, joins Codring.
ton at Vourla, üi. 122 ; at Navarino,

124-125
De Ruyter sails up the Thames, i. 198.
Descartes, his influence on religious

thought, v. 246.
De Tocqueville, M., quoted, iii. 380; his

views on associations, iv. 398; supports

iii. 34.

the cause of the Hungarian refugees,
v. 407 ; called “ scatter - brained” by

Palmerston, 444 n.
De Villèle, M., forms a Ministry, iii. 34 ;

the Duke of Wellington's interview
with, 45 ; his irritation at British policy,
61; his press prosecutions and fall,

156, 159.
Devitt, Edward, murdered, v. 186.
Devon, Lord, serves on Commission on

Irish land tenure, v. 123..
Devonport unrepresented, ii. 320.
Devonshire, Duke of, Canning dies at

his house at Chiswick, ii. 367 ; his in-

fluence in Derby, iv. 38, n.; V. 417:
Dhian Singh, favourite of Runjeet Singh,

vi. 218; supports Shere Sing, 219;

murdered, 220.
Dhuleep Singh, son of Runjeet Singh,

vi. 218; raised to the throne, 220.
Diaz, Bartholomew de, his discoveries, i.

99.
Dicey, Professor, his remarks on colonial

constitutions, vi. 377 n.
Dick, Sir Robert, leads the assault at

Sobraon, vi. 223.
Dickens, Charles, his materials for the
opening scene in “Pickwick,” ii. 287 ;

Bleak House,". referred to, iii. 277 ;
“Oliver Twist,” iv. 365; his description

of the Marshalsea, 420.
Diebitsch, Marshal, his campaign of 1829,

iii. 143, 230; in command against the
Poles, iv. 270; plan of his campaign,

271; defeated, 272; dies, 274.
Dietz, Prince Ferdinand's adviser, v. 370.
Dilke, Sir Charles, his forecast of the

future of New Zealand, vi. 363; his re-
marks on the Christian conversions
among the Maories, 364.
Disendowment, an early motion for, v.
Disraeli, Benjamin (afterwards Earl of

Beaconsfield), tries to unite Tories and
Radicals, iii. 363; opposed to the Poor-
Law, 448 ; iv. 362; his novels, 369; moves
the rejection of the bill for continuing
the Poor Law, 369; ridicules the social
quacks, 375; his speech on the Chartist
petition, 385; condemns the Local
Police Bill, 387; his verdict on the Im-
port Duties Committee, v. 11 n.; attacks
Peel's ministry, 50; his ridicule of the
Cabinet Councils of 1845, 131; denounces
Peel's “subiime audacity," 138; his
active opposition to Peel's Corn Bill,
140; comparison of with Bentinck, 142;
becomes leader of the Tory party, 202;
endeavours to lighten the taxes of the
landlords, 206; asks an explanation of

progress, 217; moves a revision of
the Poor Laws, 226; declares his want
of sympathy with the Poles, 369; his
motion in 1851 for the relief of the
agriculturists, 424; moves the claims
of the landlords to participate in fiscal
relaxations, 432 ; Chancellor of the Ex-
chequer, 451 ; his predictions about free

254.

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trade falsified, 458; declares his abandon-
ment of protection, 463 : his amendment
of Mr. Villiers' resolutions, 464 ; accepts
Palmerston's resolutions instead, .465;
his Budget, 465; defeaied, 471; his re-
mark on coalition governments, 472;
his life of Lord George Bentinck, vi.
131; his criticisms on the Afghan war,
174 ; his apophthegm respecting great

countries, 322.
Disraeli, Isaac, iv. 367.
Disruption controversy, v 295; rise of the

Moderate party, 303; protest of the
Evangelicals aginst pluralities, 305;
the agitation for the call, 307; adop-
tion of Veto Act, 309; the Auchterarder
case, 310; refusal of the Evangelicals to
accept the decision of the House of
Lords, 312; the Strathbogie case, 314;
expulsion of presbyters for complying
with the law, 315; the declaration,
claim, and protest, 318; the secession,
320 ; connection of the controversy, with

the Tractarian movement, 320.
Dissenters, disabilities of, i. 155, 156;

their position in 1828, ii. 377 ; grievances
of, iv. 69; successes of, 70; marriages,
Peel's bill for, 71; Russell's bill for, 71;
passed, 72; marriage of Roman Catholics
by Roman Catholic priest illegal and
children illegitimate, 148; oppose the
educational clauses of the Factory Bill,
v; 74; endeavours to remove their dis.
abilities, 260. (See Universities, Church

Rates.)
Dissolution, the, of 1818, i. 392 ; of 1820,

ii. 85; of 1818, 324; of 1830, 449 ; of 1831,
iii. 211; of 1841, iv. 369; v. 1; of 1847,

172; of 1852, 457.
Distillation, illicit, its prevalence, ii. 185;

history of, iv. 445.
Distress in 1816, i. 158, 331, 337, 339-345 ;

grants in aid of, in 1817, 373; in 1819,
415, 416; in 1820, ii. 91; in 1826, 206 ; in
1829, 426; in 1830, iii. 178, 179; between
1837 and 1842, iv. 357 ; its extent in
1842, v. 16, 20; its effect on the revenue,

23.
Divett, Mr., his motion against Church

rates, v. 254 n.
Division lists, publication of, iv: 344.
Dniester, the boundary of Russia, iii. 38.
Dog-carts, suppression of, iv. 402.,
Doherty, Solicitor-General for Ireland, iïi.

334.
Dolby, the prosecution of, by the Con-

stitutional Association, ii. 98.
Dolly's Brae, affray at, v. 219.
Donegal, Lord, his marriage, ii. 149; his

conduct to his tenantry, 262.
Dorin, his proposal for dealing with Oudh,
Dormer, Lord, takes his seat, ii. 421.
Dorsetshire, distress in, in 1816, i. 343 ;

overcrowding in, iv. 361.
Dorsetshire labourers, the case of, iii.

439; transported, 440; interest in, 440;
pardoned, 441.

vi. 257

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Dust Mahommed, Ameer of Cabul, vi.

157 ; his deposition decided on, 162;
obrains from Burnes a promise to mediate
for the cession of Peshawur, 160; accepts
Russian overtures, 161; flight of, 173;
escapes from Bokhara, 176; defeats the
British and surrenders, 176; replaced
on his throne, 201 ; joins the Sikhs, 228;
negotiations with, during the Persian

war, 273 11.
Douranees, insurrection of, suppressed,
Dover, the Queen's reception at, ii. 35.
Downes, Lord, Treasurer of the Ordnance,
Downshire election, cost of Lord Castle-

reagh's, i. 304.
Doyle, Dr., Roman Catholic Bishop of

ji. 441.

59.

Kildare, his evidence on Ireland, iii.
329 n. ; his pamphlet on the Poor Law,

342
Drake, his exploits, i. 106.
Drama, the history of the, iii.

304 ;
license of in eighteenth century, 305;
Playhouse Bill, 305; Acts of Geo. 11.
and Geo. III., 307 ; committee on,

310.
Drouyn de Lhuys, offers to mediate between

England and Greece, v. 413; arranges a
convention with Palmerston, 414 ; re.

called, 415; resigns his portfolio, vi.
Drovetti, M., French Consul at Alex-

andria, iii. 139, n.
Drummond, Mr., murder of, v. 25.
Drummond, Thoma', his dictum on the

duties of property, iv. 150 ; his esti.
males of the population of Ireland, vi.

382.
Drunkenness, history of, iv. 441. See

Spirits.
Drury Lane Theatre, iii. 304; monopoly

of, 307, 308.
Dryden, his poetry, i. 211, 212 ; quoted,
Dublin, its population in 1815, i. 87; its

situation and university, 87 ; communi-
cation with London in 1827, 88; reasons
which interfered with its growth, 88 ;
riot in the theatre, ii. 281 ; corporation

of, petitions for Repeal, v. 95.
Du Cane, Sir E., his statistics of convicts

quoted, iv. 410.
Du Cayla, Madame, her influence, iii.

34.
Dudley, Dud," discovers a mode of

smelting iron with coal, i. 63.
Dudley, Lord, his description of the pro-

sperity of 1825, ii. 181; accepts Foreign
Office, 356; retains it under Wellington,
374; endeavours to mediate between
Wellington and Huskisson, 388 ; retires,
388 ; his opinion of Navarino, iii. 131 ;

his views on Eastern po icy, 131.
Duelling, iv. 433 ; judicial opinions on,

434; reluctance of juries to convict for,
435; resorted to by members of Parlia.
ment, 436; trial of Lord Cardigan for,

437; society formed for abolishing, 440;

suppressed in the army, 440.
Duels, famous, i. 135, 136.
Dufay, electrical discoveries of, v. 64.
Duffy, Mr. (afterwards Sir) Charles Gavan,

edits the Nation, v. 94; his ability,

189.
Dufour, General, his canipaign against the

Sonderbund, y: 377:
Dum Dum, origin of the greased cartridge

panic at, vi. 290.
Duncan, Lord, his motions on the window

tax, v. 427
Duncannon, Lord (afterwards Lord Bess-

borough), introduces O'Connell, ii. 422 ;
on the Reform committee, iii. 206; sup-
ports Wrottesley's call of the House,
384; Home Secretary, 469; O'Connell's

letter to, 473.
Duncombe, T. S., his motion in behalf of

Chartist convicts, iv. 391 no ; moves a
hearing for the Chartists, v. 19; his
motions respecting the Westminster
theatres, 294; his motions on letter-

opening, 379 n.
Dundas, Rt. Hon. Robert (afterwards Lord

Melville), supports the Quarterly Re-

view, i. 265.
Dundas, Hon. R., his pension thrown out,
Dundas, William (Lord Clerk Register),

defends the royal boroughs, ii. 334; de-
fends the representative system of Edin-

burgh, 341.
Dundee, its importance as a seat of the

linen trade, i. 58.
Dunning, his motion against the influence

of the Crown, ii. 317.
Dunwich, borough of, i. 122 ; ii. 320.
Dupleix, governor of French India, vi.

71.
Dupuis, consul at Coomassie, ii. 213.
Durham, members given to by Charles II.,

i. 115; jurisdiction in Palatinate of, iii.

271.
Durham, Lord, his opinion of the Revolu-

tion of July, iii. 175; Privy Seal, 192;
his views on Reform, 206; a party to the
dissolution of 1831, 212; proposes to
create Peers, 236; attacks Lord Grey,
237.; objects to Stanley's Irish bills, 369 ;
retires on an earldom, 387; selected for
mission to St. Petersburg, 387 n. ; alleged
to have planned Ward's appropriation
motion, 460 n. ; attacks Brougham, iv.
130; sent to Canada, 231; his character,
131 ; his conduct, 131 ; attacked in Par-
liament, 132; resigns, 133; returns home,
134; his Canada report, 135; his failure,
137 ; his mission to St. Petersburg, 258;
unsuccessfully intercedes for Poland,

279; his opinion of Nicholas I., vi. 57:
Durham letter, the, v. 286, 422 ; quotation

from, 424 n.
Dutch, the, their trade with India, i. 107;

their naval superiority in the seventeenth
century, 198; join in the expedition to
Algiers, 205, 209; drinking habits of the,

iv. 424:

iv. 443 ; navigation laws directed against

the, v. 214.
Dymoke, the Champion, his office at the
coronation of George IV., ii.

73.

EAST INDIA COMPANY, the, its exclusive

privileges, i. 107, 109; abolished, 109;
termination of monopoly of, iii. 423, 435
n. ; thrilling character of its achieve-
ments, vi. 68; why it sought a monopoly,
69; how its servants came to engage in
war and diplomacy, 71; extensions of
territory forbidden by the, 73 ; deprived
of its monopoly, 73; possessions won for
it by Cornwallis, 75; by Wellesley, 78;
sale of offices by directors of the, 101;
extent of its territory at the time of
Lord Moira's arrival, 111; its charter of
1833, 144, 145; which led to war with
China, 194 n. ; abolition of, 321 ; review

of its rule, 322.
East Retford, bribery at, in 1826, ii. 384 ;

bill for disfranchising, 385.
Ebrington, Lord, introduces O'Connell,

i. 422; elected for Devonshire, iii. 176;
his resolution on the defeat of the Re-
form Bill, 222; made Lord Lieutenant

of Ireland, iv. 160.
Ecclesiastical Commission, disclosures of

the, v. 256; its functions, 260.
Ecclesiastical Courts (see also Delegates,

Court of), appeals from transferred to
Privy Council, iii. 292 n. ; members of
Parliament not subject to decrees of,
314; members made subject to, 315;
Pollock's bill for consolidating, iv. 15;
v. 262; instances of the exercise of their
jurisdiction, 262; reformed, 264.
Ecclesiastical Titles Act introduced, v.

422; modified, 429; made retrospective,

and passed, 431:
Edgeworth, Maria, her account of illicit

stills in Ireland, i. 185; her novels, 253-

256.
Edinburgh, its situation, population, and

history, i. 92, 93, 261; representation of,
Abercromby's motion on, ii. 341; obtains
a private Act for a theatre, iii. 307; Grey
banquet at, 475 ; School of Arts in, iv.

407.
Edinburgh Review, the, i. 242.
Education, of the higher classes, i. 132 ;

promoted by political causes, 132; de-
fects in, 133.; at the Universities, 134;
elementary, in 1816, 186; disliked by the
upper classes, 186; in England, 186, 187 ;
in Scotland, 187 ; improvements in, 189;
in Ireland, iii. 351 ; V. 116; the Charter
schools, iii. 351; commissions on, 352;
Kildare Place schools, 353; Stanley's
scheme for, 354 ; attacked, iv. 181; pro-
gress of, 182; in England, condition of,
in 1839, 182; first grant for, 183; insuffi-
ciency of grant for, 183, 184; Russell's
scheme for, 184, 186; state of, in 1841,
373; grant, 399 ; abortive attempt in
1843 to provide, v. 73; Maynooth Col.

lege, 117.; establishment of the Queen's
Colleges, 121; in India, vi. 151; verna-
cular schools instituted for, 263 ; its effect

on the moral condition of the people, 393.
Edward I., statute of, against tavern

haunting,
Edwardes, Lieutenant (afterwards Sir Her-

bert), repulses the army of Moolraj, vi.

229.
Edwards, George, informs against the Cató

Street conspirators, i. 438; leaves the

country, 440.
Edwards, Mr., rejected by the Strathbogie

presbytery, v. 314.
Edwards, Mr., his interview with the

governor of Rangoon, vi. 236.
Egerton, Lord Francis, wins South Lanca-

shire, iv. 6; moves amendment to Irish
Corporation Bill, 62; repeats the motion,

89.
Egypt, British occupation of, proposed by

the Czar, vi. 11.
Eldon, Lord, sinecures enjoyed by his

family, i. 129; condemns battue shoot.
ing, 138; his parentage, 147; his defence
of the Criminal Code, 169; Shelley's
description of, 245; his character and
career, 294, 295, 303; his account of the
distress of 1816, 342; joins the Brunswick
Club, 400; his opinion of the Peterloo
massacre, 422, 423; his views in 1819,
428; mobbed in Ringwood, ii. 51; at the
Queen's trial, 52; his remarks on the
Civil List, 86; opposes the reform of the
Criminal Code, 133 ; opposes the Mar-
riage Act, 149; opposes the Spitalfields
Bill, 174; exerts his influence in 1826
against Palmerston, 211 ; at the Duke of
York's funeral, 218; his religious views,
246; his opposition to the Roman Ca-
tholics, 260, 419; his opinion on the
Grampound Bill, 331 ; his resignation,
352; his exclusion from the Wellington
Ministry, 375; his opposition to the re-
peal of the Test Act, 380; denounces
the Irish Church Bill, 384 ; his opinion
of the Clare election, 392 ; his dislike of
Canning's policy, iii. 70; his delays and
doubts, 280; his political and legislative
duties, 281 ; serves on Chancery Com-
mission, 284; protests against Irish Tithe
Bill, 348; his position in 1833, 360; his
opinion of the trade demonstration in
1834, 441; his dislike of the Corporation
Act, iv. 39, 42; his speech on the Dis.

senters' Marriage Bill, 71.
Election, the general, of 1818, i. 392, 393;

of 1820, ii. 86; of 1826, 209, 313 ; of 1830,
iii

. 176; of 1831, 214; of 1832, 357 ; of
1834, iv. 6; of 1837, 99; of 1841, 225;
v. I; of 1847, 172; of 1852, 458.
Election committees, conflicting decisions

of, iv. 138; Buller's bill for reconstitut-
ing, 139; injustice of, 208; bills for re-

forming, 209.
Election Law, the. See Registration.
Electricity, successive investigations of,

v. 63; applied to telegraphs, 67.

iii. 3.

Elgin, Lord, Governor-General of Canada,

iv. 138.
Eliot, George, v. 322.
Eliot, Lord (afterwards Earl St. Ger.

mans), attacks Ancona expedition, iv.
266; his mission to Spain, 301; his
Arms Bill, v. 100 ; succeeds to the peer-
age and resigns his liish Secretaryship,

16.
Eliot, Sir J., his stand against the Court,
Elizabeth, Queen, endeavours to check

the growth of London, i. 83; the people
her army, 192; her religious policy, ii.
221, 223, 225 ; her rule, iii. 2; her auto-

cratic language, v. 440.
Ellenborough, the first Lord, sinecures

enjoyed by his family, i. 129; unable to
read the “Wealth of Nations," 216;
presides at the trials of Hone, 380; his
retirement, 381; opposes the reform of
the Criminal Code, ii. 133, 134; his sen.

tence on Lord Cochrane, iii. 10.
Ellenborough, the second Lord (afterwards

Earl of), his opinion and vote at the
Queen's trial, ii. 57; his opinion of the
Spitalfields Acts, 174; Lord Privy Seal,
375; President of Board of Control, 396;
his views on the Eastern question, iii.
137 ; his opinion of cheap law, 286 n.;
President of Board of Control, iv. 4;
approves Lords' amendments to Corpora-
tion Act, 43; his issue of war medals,
427 ; his declaration on the Hunt trial,
429; President of the India Board, v.
1; appointed First Lord of the Admir-
alty, 136; President of the Board of
Control, vi. 142; his views of foreign
policy, 143; his wishes relative to the
East India Company, 145; his present
to Runjeet Singh, 157 ; his negotiations
with Scinde for the navig tion of the
Indus, 168 ; appointed Governor-General
of India, 194; his character, 195 ; desires
the withdrawal from Afghanistan, 199;
his orders to the generals, 206; his
proclamation respecting the Somnauth
gates, 202; desires to retain command
of the Indus, 203 ; finds pretexts for in-
tervention in Scinde, 203; his demands
on the Ameers, 205 ; entrusts the work
of coercion to Sir Charles Napier, 206;
censure of his conduct at home, 213;
his interference in Gwalior, 214; re-
called, 214; characteristics of his rule,
214; his friendship with Sir H. Hardinge,
216; his condemnation of Canning's
Oudh proclamation, 320; retires from

the India Board, 320.
Ellice, Rt. Hon. E., Secretary at War,

iii. 461.
Elliot, Captain Charles, ambassador to

China, 195 ; surrenders the opium, 195;
refuses Lin's severe terms, 196 ; appeals
to Auckland for armed assistance, 196 ;
declares a blockade, 197 ; his conduct of

the war, 197.
Elliot, his defence of Gibraltar, i. 98.

Elliott, Ebenezer, quoted, iv. 420 ;

his
view of the tax upon corn, v. 17.
Elliott, Hugh, vi. 195 n.
Ellis, George, supports the Quarterly

Review, i. 265; sells Claremont, ii. 2.
Ellis, C. (afterwards Lord Seaford), his

defence of slavery, iii. 393 n.
Elphinstone, his amendment on the in-

come-tax, V. 13.
Elphinstone, General, appointed to the

command' in Cabul, vi. 178; his mili-
tary unfitness, 183; urges negotiating
instead of fighting, 185; begins the
retreat, 187; detained as a hostage, 188.
Elphinstone, Lord, his energy during the

İndian mutiny, vi. 314.
Elphinstone, Mountstuart, his mission to

Afghanistan, vi. 94..
Ely, riots at, in 1816, i. 344.
Ely, Lord, v. 105 n.
Emaum Ghur, Napier's march to, vi. 210.
Emigrants, sufferings of, iii. 328; number

of, 328 ; number of, in 1836-40, iv. 399;

Irish, sufferings of, v. 208.
Emigration encouraged by the Govern.

ment in 1819, i. 415; early attempts at,
iii. 325; extent of, in 1815 and 1832,
325; cost of, 325 ; committee on, 326;
bill for regulating, 327; facilities for, by
steam, iv. 399, 400; increase in, vi. 341;
causes of, in the sixteenth and seven-
teenth centuries, 338; effects of, on the

condition of the labouring classes, 389.
Emmet, rebellion of, ii. 263.
Enclosures, land, i. 144; effect of, on the

poor, iii. 319.
Encumbered Estates Act passed, v. 169;

its results, 169.
England, her fortunate situation, i.95; the

causes of her prosperity, 96.
England, General, forces the Bolan Pass,

vi. 199.
English-speaking races, rate of increase

of, vi. 381.
Enniskillen, Lord, Deputy Grand Master

of Orange Lodges, iv. 54.
Episcopacy in Scotland, history of, v. 298.
Equity. See Chancery.
Erastianism, hostility of the Scotch to,
Erskine, Lord, at the Queen's trial, ii. 53;

his saying about the Grenvilles, 117.;
his efforts to promote kindness to ani-

mal-, üi. 296 n.
Espartero made Regent, v. 354 ; fall of,

356.
Essex, Poor Law in, iii. 321.
Essex, Lord, his denunciation of the Anti-

Corn Law League, v. 129.
Esterhazy, Prince, his magnificence, ii. 73.
Estimates, attack upon, in 1816, i. 334 ;

their amount in 1820; ii. 92; in 1821,
113 ; in 1822, 118; in 1823, 151; in 1824,
165; in 1825, 183; in 1830, 438 ; referred

to select committees, v. 199.
Eton, education at, i. 133; Canning and

Lord Wellesley at, 307 ; Shelley at, 244;
dread of railways at, iv. 354.

v. 300.

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