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(Inclosure 7 in No. 31.)
A.

APRIL 7, 1863. DEAR WIFE: I write this from a by-port in France, where we are taking in stores, and I am going in the ship, and I am sending you £10 to Jones's office, and I want you to go and receive it when you get this, and half-pay, £2 10s. I bave shipped for three years, and you must not think the time long. God bless you and the little chil-' dren, and give them a kiss for me. Good night, and God bless you. Give my love to my sister and all inquiring friends. No more at present; from your affectionate husband, (Signed)

JOHN STANLEY. This is the letter marked A, referred to in the annexed affidavit of Catherine Stanley. Sworn before me this 26th November, 1863. (Signed)

J. PEARSON, d Commissioner to administer Oaths in Chancery in England.

[4371

[Inclosure 8 in No. 31.)

Deposition of Cecilia Glassbrook.

I, Cecilia Glassbrook, of 53 Upper Hill street, Liverpool, in the county of Lancaster, wife of Francis Glassbrook, of the same place, able seaman, make oath and say as follows:

About the 10th April last I received a note from my husband, Francis Glassbrook, then a seaman on board the steamer Georgia, which letter is hereunto annexed, marked A, desiring me to call at Mr. Jones's office, 28 Chapel street, Liverpool, and receive from him £10, and to make arrangement for receiving my husband's half-pay. On the 13th April'the wife of a seaman on board the Georgia, who had been to Mr. Jones's office for her money, called upon me and told me to call at Mr. Jones's office, which I did the same day, and received the £10 from a tall gentleman with a black moustache and an imperial. The same gentleman then told me to call in two months from that day to receive my husband's half-pay. I asked the gentleman whether he could not give me a half-pay note, when he replied, “No; you won't want a note when you receive the money here." I called at Mr. Jones's office on the 13th day of the first month after my husband sailed, for my husband's half-pay, having heard that the wife of another seaman on board the Georgia was receiving her half-pay that day, when I saw the same gentleman, who informed me that he did not think I could get it then, as they had received no news from the ship, and requested me to call on the 13th of the next month. I did accordingly call on the 13th day of the second month after my husband sailed, and again saw the same gentleman, and he directed the boy to pay me my balfpay, which he did. I then asked the same gentleman whether I couid see Mr. Jones, as I had a letter to send to my husband, but he said he could send it without troubling Mr. Jones. There was an elderly gentleman with grey hair and whiskers standing close to bim at this time, which I have always been led to believe was Mr. Jones. I have called regularly every month at Mr. Jones's office, and have received my husband's half-pay, the gentleman whom I saw on the first occasion having each time directed the boy to pay it to me. On the 13th day of November, instant, I called as usual at Mr. Jones's office for my husband's half-pay, when the boy informed me I could not get it that day, and must call on the following Monday. I did attend on the following Monday, between 12 and 1 o'clock, and the boy informed me that he could not pay me until he had received a reply to a telegraphic message which had been sent to London. I waited at the office until nearly 5 that evening, when the boy informed me that they closed the otfice at 6, and that I had better call early next day. On the following day I was taken ill and unable to go. On Saturday last my husband brought a receipt for the last half-pay, and told me that Mr. Jones would not pay it to him unless I signed the receipt, and I made my mark to such a receipt in the presence of my mother-inlaw. The letter marked B, hereto annexed, I received from my husband while he was in Greenock, and the letter marked C, also hereunto annexed, I received from him while he was on board the Georgia. (Signed)

CECILIA + GLASSBROOK.

mark Sworn at Liverpool, in the county of Lancaster, this 24th day of November, 1863, this affidavit having in my presence been previously read over to the deponent, whó appeared perfectly to understand the same, and made her mark thereto in my presence. (Sigued)

J. BUSHELL,
A Commissioner to administer Oaths in Chancery in England.

her

(Inclosure 9 in No. 31.)

A.

APRIL 7, 1863. DEAR WIFE: I could not get a chance to write to you before. I did write one letter to you. I hope you got it. Dear Celia, I have shipped in this ship and got £ 10 bounty, and £4 108. per month, and I have left you half-pay. When you receive this go to Jones's office and you will receive £10, and he will give you halt-pay, and ask him how you are going to write to me. Dear Celia, when you get this money start in some

kind of business. Give my love to father and mother, Stephen and uncle, and tell [438] them I hope I will be soon *home again. I have shipped for the war in my own

namo. I have not got time to say more; but good night, and God bless you.
I remain your ever-loving,
(Sigued)

FRANCIS GLASSBROOK.
This is the letter marked A referred to in the annexed aftidavit of Cecilia Glass brook.
Sworn before me this 24th day of November, 1863.
(Signed)

J. BUSHELL.

[Inclosure 10 in No. 31.)

B.

GREENOCK, April 1, 1863. DEAR WIFE: I have arrived safe on yesterday about 3 o'clock, after a good passage. We have not heard where we are going to yet, but we think we are going to Nassau, or else to meet the Alabama. I never got ashore yet, so I did not get the money, por did I see Lizzie. I can't tell when we are going to sail. Give my love to father, mother, Stephen, and uncle.

I remain your loving husband,
(Signed)

F. GLASSBROOK.
This is the letter marked B referred to in the annexed affidavit of Cecilia Glassbrook.
Sworn before me this 24th day of November, 1863.
(Signed)

J. BUSHELL.

(Inclosure 11 in No. 31.)

C.

SHIP GEORGIA, May 14, 1863. DEAREST CELIA: You must be very anxions to get a few lines from me, to know how I am getting on; but you can make yourself at ease, for I am very well, and could be very happy if I could hear from you, or even to know you are well and comfortable. Dearest Celia, I hope you had no trouble to get the money from Jones. You know that you was to receive £3 108. in the name of Frank Rivers, and £10 in that of Francis Glassbrook, and likewise £2 58. a month half-pay.

Dearest Celia, I am afraid we will not do so well as the Alabama, but we must be content. I shonld like to hear how the war is getting on, or when it is likely to be over. We shall be discharged as soon as it is done. You need not fret about me being taken by the Yankees, for your half-pay goes on still. Dearest Celia, I wish you to go to Jones and ask him how you are to write to me, and he will put you in the way of writing to me. I hope my father and mother, Stephen and uncle are well. I dare say my poor mother is fretting about me. Remember me to your sister Anne and her children, and I hope she has heard good news from her husband. I hope Stephen is a good boy and keeping steady. If anything should happen to him, I hope you will look to my mother as long as you have a shilling, for if you love me you are sure to be kind to my mother. I don't see as I have any more to say at present, only that we are all well, and ready to take the first Yankee ship that comes in our way. I dare say there is a great talk in England about us, but the newspapers can tell you more than I can.

I shall conclude by remaining still your ever-loving husband,
(Signed)

FRANCIS GLASSBROOK.
This is the letter marked C referred to in the annexed aftidavit of Cecilia Glassbrook.
Sworn before me this 24th day of November, 1863.
(Signed)

JOHN BUSHELL.

[439]

*[Inclosure 12 in No. 31.)

Deposition of Daniel Conolly.

I, Daniel Conolly, of 17 Temple Buildings, Liverpool, in the county of Lancaster, porter, make oath and say as follows:

About three weeks after my son, Benjamin Conolly, sailed in the steamer Japan, I received a letter through the post-office from Messrs. Jones & Co., 28 Chapel street, Liverpool, requesting me to call at their office, as my son Benjamin had sent £9 for me, and desiring me to call for the money. I called at Jones's office the day after I received the note, and saw a gentleman with a mustache, and showed him the letter, when he paid me the money, a £5 note and £4 in gold, and I signed a large sheet of paper containing the names of many persons. I signed under my son's name. I believe this paper was.a list of the crew of the Japan. The note had the

name Jones & Co. written on the back of it. I got the note changed in Dale street. The gentleman. took the letter from me and put it on the file. (Signed)

DANIEL CONOLLY. Sworn at Liverpool, &c., 30th November, 1863, before me, (Signed)

J. PEARSON,
A Commissioner to Administer Oaths in Chancery in England.

(Inclosure 13 in No. 31.)

Deposition of Eliza Conolly.

I, Eliza Conolly, of 17 Temple Buildings, Liverpool, in the county of Lancaster, spinster, make oath and say as follows:

On the 27th day of November instant I called at Mr. Jones's office, 28 Chapel street, Liverpool, to inquire whether he could tell me where I could find my brother, Benjamin Conolly, who had joined the steamer Japan, when I saw a gentleman with a mustache, and asked him if that office was Mr. Jones's, when he said it was. I then asked him whether he could tell me if my brother, Benjamin Conolly, had joined his ship any day this week, when he said he had not; and then he asked me what was my reason for inquiring, when I replied that I was his sister, and thought it very strange that he had not written to us, and I also told him that my brother had promised to leave my father half-pay. I then told him that my brother had left home between 6 and 7 o'clock on the morning of Monday last to join his ship, when the gentleman said he knew that he had, and that he had sent one of his clerks down to the Havre steamer to see him and Glassbrook on board, and that they got £3 each from his clerk, and then they both bolted. He then called an elderly gentleman, and said to him that I was inquiring for those two vagabonds who had ran away on Monday. He then asked me whether I knew Glassbrook, when I replied that I did not; and he said I had better go to Glassbrook's house and see if my brother was there. I asked for Glassbrook's address, and he began to write it down, when the elderly gentleman stopped him and said he was not to give it to me. (Signed)

ELIZA CONOLLY. Sworn at Liverpool, in the county of Lancaster, this 30th day of November, 1863, before me, (Signed)

J. PEARSON,
A Commissioner to Administer Oaths in Chancery in England.

No. 32.

Earl Russell to Mr. Adams.

FOREIGN OFFICE, December 9, 1863. SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 7th instant, inclosing a copy of a letter from the United States consul at Liverpool, covering a number of depositions, which, you state, [440] all go to establish, in the clearest manner, the existence *of a

regular office at Liverpool for the enlistment and payment of British subjects for the purpose of carrying on war against the Gov. ernment and people of the United States. And I have the honor to state to you that these papers shall be considered by Her Majesty's government.

I am, &c.,
(Signed)

RUSSELL.

No. 33.

The law officers of the Crown to Earl Russell.

[Immediate.]

The

law.officers

tieg should be cuted

LINCOLN'S INN, December 12, 1863. (Received December 12.) MY LORD: We are honored with your lordship's commands signified

in Mr. Hammond's letter of the 9th instant, stating that he die nothing was directed by your lordship to transmit to us a letter

from Mr. Adams, inclosing a copy of a letter from the United States consul, at Liverpool, covering a number of depositions, all going, as Mr. Adams states, to establish in the clearest manner the existence of a regular office at Liverpool for the enlistment and payment of British subjects, for the purpose of carrying on war against the Gov. ernment and people of the United States; and to request that we would take these papers into our consideration and report to your lordship our opinion thereupon.

In obedience to your lordship's commands, we have taken these papers into our consideration, and have the honor to report:

That the depositions transmitted by Mr. Adams disclose a systematic violation of the foreign enlistment act, which, in our opinion, calls for decisive measures on the part of Her Majesty's government.

We think that a strong case is established (if unanswered) against two at least of the partners of the firm of Jones & Co., viz, W. Jones and M. Hyatt, and against one of their clerks, named Wilding.

We do not collect clearly from the depositions whether Mr. Bold, the other partner, is identified as taking part in any of the transactions spoken to, nor whether a case can be made out against another clerk, who is referred to, but not by name.

We advise, that charges be preferred before a justice, in the manner prescribed by the fourth section of the foreign enlistment act, against Jones, Hyatt, and Wilding, for engaging or endeavoring to engage to enlist, &c., or to go, or agree to go, or embark, &c., for the purpose or with intent to be enlisted, &c., Stanley, Conolly, and Glassbrook, in violation of the second section of the act. We think it advisable that a charge should also be preferred against them of a conspiracy to violate that section of the act. Under this charge, anything said or done by any of them in pursuance of a common criminal design will be admissible in evidence, and the mode of proof may be facilitated. These observations apply also to Bold, and the other clerk, if proof can be obtained against them.

We understand that Barrett, who is described as the ship's yeoman, is still on board her.

We have to observe, that the facts disclosed in the depositions fur

nish additional grounds to those already existing for strong remonstrance to the confederate government, on account of the systematicviolation of our neutrality by their agents in this country.

We have, &c.,
(Signed)

ROUNDELL PALMER.
R. P. COLLIER.
ROBERT PHILLIMORE..

No. 34.

Consul Hamond to Earl Granville.

At Brest.

CHERBOURG, October 10, 1871. (Received October 12.) MY LORD: In conformity with your lordship's instructions in your dispatch of the 28th ultimo, I have the honor to transmit [441] herewith a report of the proceedings of the Georgia at this port.

I have annexed to it extracts from the newspapers, and I have collected all the information which I could obtain upon the subject.

I have, &c.,
(Signed)

HORACE HAMOND.

(Inclosure 1 in No. 34.]

Report by Consul Hamond as to the movements of the Georgia at Cherbourg in October, 1863

The confederate cruiser Georgia, reported to be of 800 tons and 200 horse-power, with 5 guns, under the command of Captain Maury, arrived in Cherbourg Roads on the 28th of October, 1863, from Teneriffe. After being anchored a short time in the roads, date uncertain, this vessel went into the dock-yard for repairs, which she was still undergoing on the 21st of November; but on the 2d of December she had again como into the roads, being reported as one of the ships of war which stood the furious galer of that day.

The confederate cruiser was admitted into the dock-yard as a “ship of war," by order of the minister of marine ; and her repairs were made by the dock-yard workmen, in one of the docks of the Napoleon III basin, and were paid by her commander, Captain Maury, at the usual rate of man-of-war's work, instead of being charged 25 per cent. extra, which is the charge on ships other than men-of-war.

The repairs were inconsiderable, the total amount paid for them, including materials and work, being only 3,141 francs 78 centimes, little more than £125 sterling.

Neither stores nor coals were supplied by the dock-yard.

The Georgia left the roads on the 16th of February, 1864, under the command of Captain Evans; her late commander, Captain Maury, being prevented by the state of his health from continuing the command. What course the Georgia took after leaving the French coast seems to be quite unknown at this port. (Signed)

HORACE HAMOND. CIIERBOURG, October 10, 1871.

[Inclosure 2 in No. 34.)

Extracts from the Phar: de la Manche."

OCTOBER 29, 1863.

La corvette de guerre Américaine confédérée la Georgia, Commandant Maury, a mouillé sur notre rade hier, 28 Octobre, à midi, venant de Ténériffe, d'où elle est partie le 18 de ce mois. Ce batiment de 800 tonneaux de jauge et de la force nominale de 200 chevaux-vapeur, a 100 hommes d'équipage, et porte 5 canons.

La Georgia va de ravitailler à Cherbourg, et y prendre du combustible.

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