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stitution's crew on board of her, except five, who joined us. We soon afterward fell in with the Prince of Wales, wbich was ransomed. We then went to Simon's Bay, Cape of Good Hope, where we got the decks calked. We staid at Simon's Bay about a fortnight, and on the first night after leaving there we met the John Wart, which was ransomed. We then steered northward, and about the 8th or 9th of October we fell in with the Bold Hunter, which we burned. We put her crew ashore at Teneriffe, where we coaled, and then proceeded to Cherbourg, in France. While we were lying at Cherbourg I got twenty-four hours' leave of absence. The paymaster gave me £1 as liberty-money. I went ashore, and having got some drink I came back to the yard where the Georgia was lying, when I changed my mind and went back again into the town, where I met the carpenter, who gave me some money to pay my fare to Havre, and I then came to Liverpool in the Havre steamer. On the Sunday before I left Cherbourg the captain of the Georgia called us aft, and said he was sorry to hear that some of us were dissatisfied with the ship, but that he had two fighting-ships coming over, and we might join either of them, and that we should have as much fighting as we liked. The captain said this to the crew on two occasions. On the 26th of November, instant, I called at Mr. Jones's office with my wife, and saw the same gentleman, and asked for Mr. Jones. He asked me what I wanted with him, and whether I was one of the men belonging to the ship: I told him I belonged to the Georgia, and he asked me whether I was going to join the ship again. I told him that I was, aud asked him for something on account of my wages. He told me that he could not pay it to me then, but requested me to call the following morning. I then asked him whether he could not give me something then, when he said, “No; you must call tomorrow.” He then asked me whether I bad seen any of the men belonging to the ship in the town, and I told him that I had, and he desired me to look them up and bring them with me to his office to-morrow. (Signed)

JOHN STANLEY, his + mark. Sworn at Liverpool, in the county of Lancaster, this 26th day of November, 1863, the affidavit having, in my presence, been previously read over to the deponent, who appeared perfectly to understand the same, and made his mark thereto in my presence. (Signed)

J. PEARSON,
A Commissioner to administer Oaths in Chancery in England

(Inclosure 1 in No. 31.]

Deposition of Francis Glasebrook.

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*

I, Francis Glassbrook, of 53 Upper Hill street, Liverpool, in the county of Lancaster, able seamen, make oath and say as follows:

On the 27th March last I heard some men were wanted for a steamer going to. China, and I went to the Sailors' Home, Liverpool, and shipped in the screw-steamer Georgia, under the name of Francis Rivers, for a voyage to Singapore and back to the United Kingdom, not to exceed two years. After I signed articles, a tall gentleman, with a black mustache and an imperial, whose name I have been informed and believe is Robert Hyatt, told me to take my clothes to Mr. Jones's office, 28 Chapel street, which I did. i theu received orders to call the following morning at his office, which I did; and the same gentleman told me to be at the Greenock steamer on the following

Monday night at 5 o'clock. I went to the Greenock steamer as ordered, and there [432] saw * Captain Hitchcock and Mr. Jones, who was superintending the shipping

of our clothes. We sailed for Greenock that night, and arrived there on the 21st; we were then taken on board of a tug-boat, which took us to the Japan, or Georgia. On the 3d of April we left Greenock, as was reported, on a trial-trip. During the time we were upon the supposed trial-trip we fell in with a small steamer, which came alongside of us, and we towed her to Brest, where we came to anchor. While we were lying at anchor at Brest the small steamer discharged a large number of cases containing arms and ammunition into the Japan, under the superintendence of Mr. Jones, who came aboard the Japan from the small steamer. I saw several of the cases opened, which contained arms. The captain of the Japan then put on his uniform, and several officers came on board from the small steainer. The captain then called all hands aft, and told us that his vessel was going to sail as a confederate cruiser, and told us that those who wished to join should have £4 108. a month, and £10 bounty. One of the men then asked him if we should have our share of the prize-niovey, when the captaiu told him if the crew of the Alabama received any prize-money we should get it. A great many of the men refused to go, but I and about thirty others agreed to join, and we were then taken into the cabin, and signed articles again to serve in the Japan, and were each paid £10 on signing, Mr. Jones being in the cabin at the time taking down

the addresses of our wives. I signed articles the second time in my right name. We all signed for three years, or during the war. After I signed articles I asked Captain Maury whether he would give me half-pay, as I was married; when he took down the address of my wife, and said that he would leave instructions for my half-pay to be paid to her. Mr. Jones was still in the cabin when I asked Captain Maury about my half-pay, I inclosed my £10 bounty-money in a letter which I sent to my wife by Mr. Jones, and told her that she must call and see Mr. Jones, and inquire if he had received orders to pay her my balf-pay; and my wife called at his office and received the money; and she has since called regularly every month at Mr. Jones's office, and he has paid her my half-pay. I also gave my advance-note to my wife, and it was cashed at Mr. Potter's, 8 James street. We left Brest on the 9th of April, and about the 25th we fell in with the Dictator, from Liverpool, bound to Hong-Kong; we ran close up to her and hove to, and sent a boat aboard of 'ber; we then brought her crew on board the Japan, and burned her. We were flying the English ensign from leaving Brest, but when we got alongside the Dictator we hoisted the confederate flag. We then went to the Western Islands, where we found an American man-of-war at anchor, which bad arrived before us; we then went to Bahia, where we landed the crow of the Dictator, except six, who had agreed to join the Japan ; we there met the bark Castor, and took in coals from her; while we were taking in coals wo were stopped by the authorities, and we had to get the remainder of our coals from shore; after we finished coaling several men, who had been prisoners on board the Alabama, joined us, and we then went on our cruise. We fell in with the George Griswold, from Liverpool to Rio Janeiro, and sent a boat to her; we did not burn this vessel, her captain having given a bond; we then fell in with the bark Good Hope, from Boston to the Cape of Good Hope, which we burnt. On the same day we fell in with the J. W. Sever, from Boston, which was ransomed; we placed the crew of the Good Hope on board of her; we then proceeded to a desolate island called Trinadi, where we expected to meet the Castor ; after lying there a week, the Castor not having made her appearance, we sighted a ship, which proved to be the Constitution, from New York, laden with coals; we filled our vessel with coals from her, and then burnt her. During the time we were taking in coals from the Constitution, we fell in with the City of Bath, which we boarded, and ransomed; several of the crew of the Constitution also joined the Japan, and we put the remainder on board of the City of Bath. We then cruised about, and in about a week we fell in with the Prince of Wales, which was also ransomed. We then went to Simon's Bay, Cape of Good Hope, where we got the decks calked, and coaled. After staying there about a fortnight, we left and steered toward England, and on the first night after leaving we fell in with the John Watt, which we learnt had been previously boarded by the Vanderbilt; we did not burn the John Watt, her captain having given a bond. We then steered northward, and on the 9th of October, we fell in with the Bold Hunter, which we burnt on the 10th; we put her crew ashore at Teneriffe. We coaled at Teneriffe, and then proceeded to Cherbourg, in France, where we remained about a week. I left the Japan at Cherbourg, having got leave of absence for a week. I got £10 from the purser as liberty-money. On the Saturday previous to my leaving Cherbourg for Liverpool, the captain of the Japan, Mr. Maury, called all hands aft and said : " Well, my

men, I hear that a great many of you are dissatisfied with the vessel, and I am sorry [433] *to hear that some of you want to leave her; I do not wish to part with any of you, being such a good crew

; I have stuck to my bargain with you, and I hope you will all stick to yours.” One of the men then said to the captain that we did not wish to leave the service; we were all dissatisfied with the ship, and wanted to be on board a ship more able to fight. The captain then said that we should have two fightingships before long, and weshould have as much tighting as we could do with. Several of tlie men then spoke about leaving for Liverpool, when the captain said he had no orders yet to graut leave to any of us, but that he was going to Paris that night to see his superior, and on his return he would give is further information. On his return from Paris he again called us aft, and said that he had got very good news from Paris ; that he could give us leave for a short time, but that he could not part with any of us ; but that if any of us could not agree among ourselves, we might join either of the two vessels which he had coming. On my return to Liverpool I went to Mr. Jones's office, in Chapel street, and asked him how I was to get back to the Japan; but he denied all knowledge of the vessel, and advised me to write to the captain. On the 21st day of November, instant, I again called at Mr. Jones's office in company with Benjamin Conolly, and saw the gentleman with a mustache. I asked for Mr. Jones, and the gentleman then asked ine if I belonged to the Florida ; I replied, n); I belonged to the Georgia ; he then said that he had news for us, and wanteil us to go back to the ship ; I then asked him if he could give me my half-pay, when he said that my half-pay was waiting, in the office, for my wife, and that he would not pay it to any one but her; I then informed him that my wife was ill, and asked him if I got her to sign a receipt for the money whether he woull pay it to me; when he said he would, and he directed the boy to make out a receipt for the half-pay; I took the receipt home to my wite, and

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she made hier mark to it in the presence of my mother, and I afterward took it to Mr. Jones's office, and the clerk paid me the money. The same clerk then told me to call at the odice again at 3 o'clock, and I did call at that time, when he requested me to be at the Havre boat on the following Monday morning, at 8 o'clock, as he wanted me to join the ship again, and he would then pay my passage to Cherbourg. I went to the Havre boat, as directed, on Monday morning, the 23d of November, instant, and saw there Frank Barron, the yeoman of the Georgia, or Japan, who introduced me to a strange clerk from Jones's office ; he was a young man, about 5 feet 7 or 8 inches high, without any wbiskers, and whose name I have been informed and believe is John Welding: The clerk said to me that he did not think I was going to come, as it was late; I then asked him if I was to go back to the Georgia, and he said yes; I then asked him to whom was I to report myself, when Barron answered that I was, of course, to report myself to one of the deck-officers when I reached Cherbourg: The clerk then asked me to sign two papers, which I thought were receipts for the £3, which be then gave me to pay my passage round to Havre; I signed the papers on a bale of goods on the dock quay; the clerk then asked me to go on board the Havre steamer, but I made an excuse that I wanted to get a glass of grog before leaving ; the clerk objected to my going away, but as I insisted upon going, he at last consented. In the schedule I have given a list of the officers and crew of the Georgia. The schedule referred to is as follows: L. Maury, captain, and Chapman, first lieutenant, left us at Cape Town; Mr. Evans, second lieutenant; Mr. Smith, third lieutenant; Mr. Ingram, fourth lieutenant, or sailing-master; Mr. Walker, passed midshipman; Mr. Morgan, midshipman ; Mr. Curtis, paymaster; William May, master-at-arms; George Stevenson, sergeant; Henry J. Jones, doctor's assistant; Mr. Pearson, chief engineer; Mr. Butler, second engineer; Smith, third engineer, left us at Cape Town ; Mr. Hannon, fourth engineer; Mr. Naylor, gunner; Mr. Morton, boatswain; Thomas Williams, chief boatswain's mate; Thomas Williams, second boatswain's mate; Thomas Monk, fourth boatswain's mate; Thomas Call and Frank Mills, captains of forecastle; John Benson, captain of foretop ; Robert Rodway, captain of maintop; Felix Morgan and William Williams, captains of afterguard ; Thomas Hiley,James Hendry, and William Jackson, quartermasters; William Dunn, acting gunner; John Williams, gunner's mate; William Price, cook; Freeman, ship’s steward; Fleming, ward-room steward; W. Bassell, armorer ; John Stanley, cooper; Joseph Seymour, lives at 33 Bedford street, Liverpool, seaman ; Matthews, painter'; R. Neil, carpenter, and Mr. Ewen, joiner ; Jerome Ebrio, sail-master; Alex. Crozier, Alex. McDonald, Thompson, Robinson, W. Hayes, Neilson, Smith, Y. James, Fitzgerald, Peterson, John Lyons, William Lloyd, Hinds, and Murray, seamen ; W. Cox, Ford, MoThien, and J. Clayton, boys; Joseph Hobbs, captain of the hold ; Frank Barron, ship’s yeoman; James Wilson, William Cullen, John Allstone, and Smith, seamen ; John Brown, No. 1, and John Brown, No. 2, seamen; Bernard Allen, John

Dollan, Thomas Jonas, seamen ; T. McChee, A. Ellis, A. Pantee, John McCarthey, [434] "Michael Droomy, William Davitt, Benjamin Conolly, 17 Temple Building, Liver

pool; Gordon, Curtis, Thurston, Michael Connor, Walter Owen, James Wilson, John Williams, tiremen; Thompson, ward-room cook; Antonio Bass, captain's cook ; Mr. Hunt, master's mate; J. Williams, gunner's mate. (Signed)

FRANCIS GLASSBROOK. Sworn at Liverpool, in the county of Lancaster, this 24th day of November, 1863, before me. (Signed)

JUSTLEY PEARSON,
A Commissione) to Administer Oaths in Chancery in England.

(Inclosure 5 in No. 31.)

Deposition of Benjamin Conolly. Benjamin Conolly, of No. 17 Temple Buildings, Liverpool, in the county of Lancaster, fireman, makes oath and says as follows:

On the 27th day of March last I was at the Sailors' Home, Liverpool, when I met Mr. Barnett, a shipping-agent, who informed me that I had a chance of going in a steamer to Singapore. Mr. Barnett then introduced me to Captain Hitchcock, who told me that he would take me. I then signed articles, and a gentleman with a black mustache and an imperial, whose name I have been informed and believe is Robert Hyatt, came up to me and told me to take my clothes down to Mr. Jones's office, 28 Chapel street, Liverpool, which I did, and there saw the same gentleman. On the following morning, Saturday, I called at Mr. Jones's office, as requested, and received my advance note. I then received orders to be at the Greenock boat on the following Monday, at 5 o'clock. I went to the Greenock steamer, as ordered, and there saw Captain Hitchcock and Mr. Jones, who was superintending the shipping of our clothes. We sailed for Greenock that night, and arrived there on the 31st. We were taken on board of a tug-boat, which took us to the Japan, or Georgia. On the 3il of April we left Greenock as reported, upon a trial-trip; and while we were on the supposed trial-trip,we fell in with a steamer which brought us several more hands, provisions, and clothing. We afterward fell in with another small steamer, which we towed to Brest; and she there discharged a great many cases, containing arms and amunition, into the Japan, under the superintendence Mr. Jones, who came on board of the Japan from the small steamer while we were lying at anchor at Brest. I know the cases contained arms and ammunition, because I assisted in opening several of them. Both the arms and ammunition cases were marked Alderney, and the muskets were marked Blakeley. After we got the cases on board, the captain of the Japan came aft, dressed in uniform, (a gray uniform,) with the letters C. S. N. on the buttons, and called all hands to him, and told us that we were going to sail under the confederate flag ; that we should have £10 bounty and £4 108. per month wages, if we joined. He also said we should have prize-money if the Alabama's crew received it. While the captain of the Japan was addressing us, Mr. Jones was standing close to him, and he afterward came among us, endeavoring to induce us to join. Mr. Jones came to me and asked if I would join, but I refused; and Mr. Jones told me that I was throwing a good chance away; that it was an excellent chance for me to make my fortune; that I should have plenty of money; and he at last induced me to join. Those who agreed to join them went into the cabin of the Japan. Mr. Jones was in the cabin, and taking down the addresses of the men's wives who received half-pay. I was paid £10 bounty upon siguing articles. We joined for three years, or during the war with the North. We left Brest on the night of the 9th of April, and about the 25th we fell in with the Dictator, from Liverpool, and boarded her, and then brought the crew on board the Japan, and burned her. Wethen went to the Western Islands, where we found an American man-of-war lying at anchor, the name of which, I think, was the Mohican. We then went to Bahia, and landed the crew of the Dictator there, except a few who had agreed to join us. We met the bark Castor at Bahia, and took in coals from her. While we were taking in coals we were stopped by the authorities, and got the remainder of our coals from shore. Several men, who had been prisoners on board the Alabama, joined us at Bahia, and we then went on our cruise. We soon afterward fell in with the George Griswold, which was ransomed, her captain having given a bond. We also fell in with the bark Good Hope, from Boston, which we burned. On the same day we boarded the J. W. Sever, from Boston, which

was ransomed. We put the crew of the Good Hope on board of her. We then [435] * proceeded to the island of Trinadi, where we had arranged to meet the Castor

to coal. After lying there about a week, waiting for the Castor, we sighted the Constitution, from New York, laden with coals, which we boarded, and after filling our vessel with coals from her, we burned her. During the time we were taking in coals, we fell in with the City of Bath, which was also ransomed. We placed the Constitution's crew on board of the City of Bath, except about six, who agreed to join us. In about a week afterward we fell in with the Prince of Wales, which was ransomed. We then went to Simon's Bay, where got the decks calked. After leaving Simon's Bay, we fell in with the John Watt, which was also ransomed. We then steered northward, and about the 9th of October we fell in with the Bold Hunter, which we burned the following day. We put her crew ashore at Teneriffe, where we coaled. We then started for Cherbourg, in France, where we arrived about the 28th of October last. I left the Japan in Cherbourg (government dock-yard) and arrived in Liverpool on the 30th. I got a week's leave of absence, and received £20 liberty-money. On the Sunday previous to my leaving Cherbourg for Liverpool, the captain of the Japan, Mr. Maury, called all hands aft, and said, " Well, my men, I hear that a great many of you are dissatisfied with the vessel, and I am sorry to hear that some of you want to leave her. I do not wish to part with any of you, being such a good crew. I have stuck to my bargain with you, and I hope you will stick to yours. One of the men then said to the captain, "We did not wish to leave the service; we were all dissatisfied with the ship, and wanted to go on board of a ship more able to fight.” The captain then said, “ That we should have two fighting-ships before very long, and we should have as much fighting as we could do with.” Several of the men then spoke about leaving for Liverpool, when the captain said, “He had no orders yet to grant leave to any of us, but that he was going to Paris that night to see his superior, and on his return he would give us further information." On his return from Paris he again called us aft, and said, " That he bad got very good news for us from Paris; that he could give us leave for a short time, but that he could not part with any of us; but that if any of us could not agree among ourselves, we might join either of the two vessels which he had coming." On Monday last, the 16th of November, I called at Mr. Jones's office, in Chapel street, Liverpool, and asked him how I was to get back to the Japan, when he told ine to call again in a day or two, and he would pay my passage to France. Upon signing articles, I received an allvauce note for two pounds, which was signed Jones & Co., 28 Chapel street, Liverpool. I got the note cashed at Jacob's, Paradise street. None of the crew of the Japan received any half-pay notes, the captain having given instructions for the balf pay to be paid by his agents in England to the men's wives, whose addresses the captain took at the time we signed articles. On the 21st of November, instant, I again called at Mr. Jones's office, in company with Mr. Francis Glassbrook, and again saw the same gentleman, who asked us if we belonged to the Florida. We told bim “No; we belonged to the Georgia.” He then said he had news for us, and wanted us to go back to the ship. I asked him if he could allow me half-pay, when he asked me if I was married. I told him I was not married, and he then said he could not give me half-pay. He then told me to call again at three o'clock, and I did attend at that time, when he gave me orders to be at the Havre boat on the following Monday morning, at 8 o'clock, to joiri the sbip again, and he would pay my passage-money to Cherbourg. I went to the Havre boat, as directed, Monday morning, the 23d of November, instant, and saw Frank Barron, the yeoman of the Georgia, who introduced me to a strange clerk from Mr. Jones's office. He was a young man, about the middle beight, without a beard, and whose name I have been informed and believe is John Welding. The clerk then said to me that he did not think I was coming, as I was so late. I then asked him if I was to go back to the Georgia, and he said, “ Yes." I then asked him to whom was I to report myself; when Barron answered that I was, of course, to report myself to one of the deck-officers when I reached Cherbourg. The clerk then asked me to sign two papers, which we thought were receipts for £3, which he gave us to pay our passage round to Havre. I signed the receipt on a bale of goods on the dock quay. The clerk then asked me to go on board the steamer, when I made an excuse that I wanted to get a glass of grog with Glassbrook before I left. The clerk objected to our leaving, but he at last consented. (Signed)

BENJAMIN CONOLLY. Sworn at Liverpool, in the county of Lancaster, the 24th day of November, 1863, be(Signed)

J. PEARSON,
A Commissioner to administer Oaths in Chancery in England.

fore me,

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Deposition of Catherine Stanley. I, Catherine Stanley, of No. 26 Court, Ovid street, Vauxhall road, Liverpool, in the county of Lancaster, wife of John Stanley, of the same place, cooper, make oath and say as follows:

I called at Mr. Jones's office about the 12th of April last, as directed by my husband, for the balance of his advance note, when I saw a gentleman with a moustache, who paid me the money. My husband had previously taken me to Jones's office and informed this gentleman I was his wife. About the 9th of April last I received a letter from my husband, then cooper of the steamer Georgia, which letter is hereunto annexed, marked A, informing me that he had shipped in that vessel for three years, and that he had sent £10 for me by Mr. Jones, and desiring me to call upon him and receive it, and make arrangements about the half-pay. I went to Mr. Jones's office the day I received the letter, and saw an elderly gentleman, with a reddish face, whom I have since been informed was Mr. Jones. He asked me what I was going to do with all that money ; that it was quite unexpected for me to get it, and told me that if my husband stopped with the ship until the end of three years I should be independent. He then said that he had not sufficient money in the office to pay mo then, and told me to call the next day. Mr. Jones also told me that I should get balf-pay. I called the next day, and saw a tall gentleman with a moustache, who paid me the £10, and I signed a receipt for it. The gentleman then told me to call on the 13th of June for half-pay. I did call on the 13th of June, and saw the same gentleman, who paid me the money himself. I have called at Jones's oftice regularly every month up to the 13th of October last, and have been paid the half-pay; the same gentleman sometimes paid it to me, and sometimes the boy paid it. I called on the 14th November, instant, as usual for the balf-pay, when I saw the same gentleman, who told me he had no orders yet to pay me. He said that he had sent a telegraphic message about the matter, and he had no reply yet. He told me to call next day, which I did, but did not get any money, and I called daily up to the 18th November, instant, on which day the boy paid me the money. (Signed)

CATHERINE STANLEY. Sworn at Liverpool, in the county of Lancaster, this 26th day of November, 1863, before me, (Signed)

J. PEARSON,
A Commissioner to administer Oaths in Chancery in England.

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