Microeconomics in Context

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Designed for one-semester use, this innovative, principles-level text takes a broad 'contextual' approach to economics - including serious consideration of ecological, feminist, and social concerns - while still including coverage of the standard microeconomic concepts and models. Unlike most microeconomics textbooks, which focus exclusively on markets and efficiency, this book starts with the question of human well-being and then examines how economic activities can contribute to, or detract from, well-being. It addresses such critical concerns as ecological sustainability, distributional equality, the quality of employment, and the adequacy of living standards.Like its companion volume, "Macroeconomics in Context", this text includes discussions of historical, institutional, political, and social factors that encourage students to engage with the subject matter. An Instructor's Resource Manual, Test Bank, and Student Study Guide are available on the authors' website for instructors who adopt the text.

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Contenido

Economic Activity in Context
3
Economic Activity in Context
13
Economic Actors and Organizations
32
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Acerca del autor (2009)

Julie A. Nelson is a senior research associate at the Global Development and Environment Institute at Tufts University. She received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1986 and is the author or coauthor of two previous books.

Frank Ackerman is senior research fellow at Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) US Center. He is an economist and has written extensively about the economics of climate change and other environmental problems. He is a funder and member of the settering committee of Economists for Equity and Environment, and a member scholar of the Centre for Progressive Reform. Frank received his Ph.D in economics from Harvard University in 1975.

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