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The appetite may sicken and so die.-
That strain again ;—it had a dying fall :
O, it came o'er my ear like the sweet south,
That breathes upon a bank of violets,
Stealing and giving odor.--Enough : no more ;
'Tis not so sweet now as it was before.
Twelfth Night-Act 1, Sc. 1.

SHAKSPEARE.
RED-HOT.

93. This is the state of man: To-day he puts forth

The tender leaves of hope, to-morrow blossoms,
And bears his blushing honors thick upon him :
The third day comes a frost, a killing frost;
And—when he thinks, good easy man, full surely
His greatness is a ripening, nips his root,

And then he falls, as I do.
King Henry 8thAct 3, Sc. 2.

SAAKSPEARE. A New LEMON.

94. The man that hath no music in himself,

Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds,
Is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils ;
The motions of his spirit are dull as night,
And his affectious dark as Erebus :

Let no such man be trusted.
Merchant of Venice-Act 5, Sc. 1.

SHAKSPEARE. BLOOD.

95. 'Tis greatly wise to talk with our past hours ;

And ask them what report they bore to Heaven ;

And how they might have borne more welcome news. Night Thoughts.

YOUNG.

96. -Satan can cite Scripture for his purpose.

An evil soul producing holy witness,
Is like a villain with a smiling cheek ;
A goodly apple rotten at the heart;

O, what a goodly outside falsehood hath !
Merchant of VeniceAct 1, Sc. 3.

SHAB SPEARE. Bottom.

97. O heaven! that one might read the book of fate,

And see the revolution of the times
Make mountains level, and the continent
(Weary of solid firmness) melt itself
Into the sea! and, * * how chances mock
And changes fill the cup of alteration
With divers liquors! O, if this were seen,
The happiest youth,-viewing his progress through,
What perils past, what crosses to ensue,-

Would shut the book, and sit him down, and die.
King Henry 4th, Second Part-Act 3, Sc. 1. SHAKSPEARE.

DEEP MAD.

98. If thine enemy hunger, feed him; if he thirst, give him

drink : for in so doing thou shalt heap coals of fire on his

head. Romans-Ch. 12, Ver. 20.

BIBLE. WEARY ATHENIANS.

99. Opinion's but a fool, that makes us scan

The outward habit by the inner man. Pericles, Prince of Tyre-Act 2, Sc. 2.

A Mummy or a Nindy.

SAAKSPEARE.

100. Lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither

moth nor rust doth corrupt, and where thieves do not

break through nor steal. Matthew Ch. 6, Ver. 20.

BIBLE, Missions.

101.

-0, Luxury !
Bane of elated life ; of affluent states,
What dreary change, what ruin is not thine ?
How doth thy bowl intoxicate the mind !
To the soft entrance of thy rosy cave
How dost thou lure the fortunate and great!

Dreadful attraction ,
Ruins of Rome.

DY&R.

102. The weary sun hath made a golden set,

And by the bright track of his fiery car,

Gives token of a goodly day to-morrow.
King Richard 3rd-Act 5, Sc. 3.

A NEW REALM.

SHAKSPEARE.

103.

- The southern wind
Doth play the trumpet to his purposes ;
And by his hollow whistling in the leaves,

Foretells a tempest and a blustering day.
King Henry 4th, First Part- Act 5, Sc. 1. SHAKSPEARE.

A WHEAT FIELD.

104. The truly brave are generous to the fallen.

Marino Faliero

BYRON,

105. Boast not thyself of to-morrow; for thou knowest not what

a day may bring forth. ProverbsCh. 27, Ver. 1.

BIBLE. A BANQUET.

106. The boast of heraldry, the pomp of power,

And all that beauty, all that wealth o'er gave,
Await alike th' inevitable hour,

The paths of glory lead but to the grave.
Elegy written in a country church-yard.

GRAI.

107. Virtue and knowledge are endowments greater

Than nobleness and riches : careless heirs
May the two latter darken and expend;
But immortality attends the former,

Making a man a god.
Pericles, Prince of Tyre-Act 3, Sc. 2.

SUAKSPEABE.
The Home of MAMMON.

108. While reading pleases, but no longer, read ;

And read aloud, resounding Homer's strain
And wield the thunder of Demosthenes.

The chest so exercised, improves its strength.
Art of Preserving Health.

ARMSTRONG.

109. I Wisdom dwell with prudence, and find out knowledge of

witty inventions. Proverbs-Ch. 8, Ver. 12.

BIBLE. Behave like a Dean.

110. Who bates mine honor, shall not know my coin. Timon of Athens-Act 3, Sc. 3.

KSPEARE. ENCOMIUM.

111. When Learning's triumph o'er her barb'rous foes

First reared the stage, immortal Shakspeare rose ;
Each change of many-colored life he drew,
Exhausted worlds, and then imagined new :
Existence saw him spurn her bounded reign,

And panting Time toiled after him in vain.
Prologue, written for Garrick.

SAM. JOHNSON.

112. O Lord, how manifold are thy works! in wisdom hast

thou made them all: the earth is full of thy riches. Psalm 104, Ver. 24.

BIBLE. NOTICE A RUNNER.

113. So live, that when thy summons comes to join

The innumerable caravan, that moves
To that mysterious realm, where each shall take
His chamber in the silent halls of death,
Thou go not, like the quarry-slave at night,
Scourged to his dungeon ; but, sustained and soothed
By an unfaltering trust, approach thy grave,
Like one who wraps the drapery of his couch

About him, and lies down to pleasant dreams.
Thanatopsis.

BRYANT.

'14.

-Loving goes by haps : Some Cupid kills with arrows, some with traps. Much Ado about Nothing Act 3, Sc. 1. SHAKSPEARE.

ASHAMED.

115. Who steals my purse, steals trash ; 'tis something, nothing;

'Twas mine, ’tis his, and has been slave to thousands ;
But he that filches from me my good name,
Robs me of that, which not enriches him,

And makes me poor indeed.
Othello-Act 3, Sc. 3.

SHAKSPEARE. A May Game at HOME.

116. -Oftentimes to win us to our harm,

The instruments of darkness tell us truths ;
Win us with honest trifles, to betray us

In deepest consequence.
Macbeth-Act 1, Sc. 3.

SHAKSPEARE. A TALL DOME.

117. It is in vain that we would coldly gaze

On such as smile upon us; the heart must

Leap kindly back to kindness. Childe Harold-Canto 3, Stanza 53.

A MELLOW HOME.

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118. Sorrow concealed, like an oven stopped,

Doth burn the heart to cinders where it is.
Titus Andronicus-Act 2, Sc. 5.

A Man on the Nile.

KSPEARE.

119. Unquiet meals make ill digestion. Comedy of Errors-Act 5, Sc. 1.

Try the HEALTH.

SHAKSPEARE.

120.

-Be just and fear not: Let all the ends thou aim'st at, be thy country's, Thy God's, and truth's; then if thou fall'st, O, Cromwell,

Thou fall'st a blessed martyr. King Henry 8thAct 3, Sc. 2.

SHAKSPEARE, An UnHOLY MAN.

121. A friend should bear his friend's infirmities. Julius Cæsar-Act 4, Sc. 3.

SHAKSPEARE. A New BROOM.

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