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Why Children Don't Obey

OBEDIENCE is the foundation of character. Yet how

many parents discover constantly that their instructions to their children carry no farther than around the corner. And wilfulness, selfishness, jealousy, disrespect, untruthfulness, ill-temper and many other unpleasant qualities are directly related to that first great fault of disobedience.

New Methods for Old

Until now, scolding and whipping seem to have been about the parents' only methods. But new methods have been discovered which make it easy to train children to obey promptly, pleasantly and surely without breaking

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the child's will, without creating fear. resentment or revenge in the child's heart, as whipping does. This new method is based on confidence. When perfect understanding and sympathy exist, obedi ence comes naturally and all the bad traits that children pick up so easily are not given a chance to develop.

Highest Endorsements This new system, which has been put into the form of an Illustrated Course, pre pared especially for the busy parent, producing remarkable and immediate results for thousands of parents in all parts of the world, and is endorsed by leading educators. It covers all ages from cradle to eighteen years.

Free Book

"New Methods in Child Training" Is the title of a startling book which describes this new system and outlines the work of the Parents Association. Send letter or postal today and the book, will be sent free-but do it now as this announcement may never come to your notice again. THE PARENTS ASSOCIATION, Dept. 112 Pleasant Hill, Ohio.

TO "SEE HISTORY BEING MADE," READ

Under Four
Administrations

By Oscar S. Straus

[Only a portion of which has appeared in The Outlook]

CONFIDANT of monarchs, Presidents, Premiers,

CON

poets and scholars, America's most illustrious living diplomat in turn takes the reader unreservedly into his confidence. . . Distinguished figures move in a continuous and vital stream through these memoirs-Lloyd George in a jocular mood at dinner, Kipling looking after his daughter in society, the Sultan sipping coffee from diamond-studded cups, Grover Cleveland at midnight suppers of delicatessen and beer, Rumania's Queen at her typewriter, Roosevelt under a Christmas tree at the White House.

"To read this fascinating autobiography is to see history being made. . . . Mr. Straus's remarkable life has been lived on five different continents, and has for fifty years been tirelessly identified with the world's most dramatic events."-New York Times.

"If you are tired of novels, bored with history, or fed up with biography, you will find sure relief in the engrossing pages of 'Under Four Administrations.'

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BOOKS FOR GIFTS The Outlook

My Years on the Stage

By JOHN DREW

OLIVER HERFORD writes in Life: The glamour
of the golden age of American Drama is happily re-
Sected in the minor of this narrative whose aimable
records and commentaries together with the direct-
ness and the good style of its telling place it at the
head of all the personal dramatic histories of late
Fully illustrated, $5.00

Three Plays

By LUIGI PIRANDELLO

-Stx Characters in Search of an Author." a recent
success in London and a present sensation in New
York, is to be produced this winter by Pitoed in Paris
and Reinhardt i Berim and Musach. The publica-
tion of it, with two other plays also in his character-
istically original and brilliant manner, bas moved the
critics to say that the publication of Pirandello's
Three Plays seem to us now as important a work
as the first publication of Shaw's plays" First Amer.
ed. Imited to 156 cupies.
$3.50

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A record of the manifold activities of James Gibbons
as parish priest, misantary bubop, metropolitan

of

contacts here and abroad with rulers and state
men, of has infuence in labor candles and wherever
the questions of the day demanded has wise considera-
These volumes deserve to stand beside the de
of Philips Brooks, of Theodore Roosevelt, or of your
favorise Asterican whoever he may be. With portraits
and other Eustrations. Two vols
$10.00

The Romantic World of
Music

By WILLIAM ARMSTRONG
HENRY T. FINCK, the musical critic of the Year
1 x Fox at Pot.commends this book of aneod tes
about the famous smpers whose friendships the author
has shared it is the most personal and entertain-
ing book on musicians published in years." With 30
portrans.
$5.00

William Dean Howells

By DELMAR GROSS COOKE
BRANDER MATTHEWS writes in the Irractant
But-It is the kind of book which Howells
homef wild have been gand to read and perhaps
even to mes.... It is because Mr. Cooke is as
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work and of aŭ the works of a great artist in letters
is Skely to hasten the day when the abading value of
Howeals's contributie sal be more widely recognized
and more soudly supported."
$3.00

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Copyright, 1922, by The Outlook Company
TABLE OF CONTENTS

Vol. 132 December 20, 1922 No. 16

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CHARLES JOSE BONAPARTE

His Life and Pa

By Joseph Buckin

This is an able biography a ing American whose long ret - service showed him a power --, good government. As Attr stood shoulder to shoulder va Roosevelt in his strenuo p trust domination. Mr. Baby admirably the spirit of the m lessness, integrity and charsten, Illustrated. $

688

688

CHARLES SCRIBNER'S SONS, ET

Thy Tongue a Party-Verdict Gave... 689
Cartoons of the Week

The State of Agriculture.....
A State Tax on Coal......

690

691

Coal Shortage and Coal Substitutes.. 691
President Harding's Advice to Congress 692
Can a Poet Make a Living?...
Adopting a Village........

Newberry's Successor: A Study of
Senator Couzens....

Interviewed for The Outlook by Richard
Barry

694
694

695

The Turco-Bolshevist Menace........ 698
Special Correspondence from the Lausanne
Conference by Elbert Francis Baldwin
Some Impressions of a Trip to Europe 699
Special Correspondence by Baron S. A. Korf
Ellis Island Through Russian Eyes... 701
Illustrations by Usa Gombarg

The Heart of Alaska.............

By Sherman Rogers

Christmas at Hattonchatel: A Story

704

of Village Reconstruction in France 707
By Belle Skinner

Christmas Eve on the Plantation.... 709

By Archibald Rutledge

Fuel for Steamboats and Humans.... 712
By Fullerton Waldo

The Enjoyment of Music: What is
Good Piano Playing?...........

By W. J Henderson

713

In the Field of the Shepherds: 1918. 716
By Allan A. Hunter

Poems by Bernice Lesbia Kenyon: To
One Who Walks the Highroad; Smil-
ing Woman; Potentialities; Impreg-
nable.....

Maria Rapallo...

By Elsie Singmaster

Out of the Past....

718

719

723

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TEACHERS' AGENC The Pratt Teachers

70 Fifth Avenue, New lin Recommends teachers to colleges pic Advises parents about school. Wm. 0. Ps

TRAINING SCHOOLS FOR

St. John's Riverside Hospi

School for Nurses

YONKERS, NEW YOR Registered in New York State, ofer as general traning to refined, educatel *** ments one year high school or its eques Directreas of Nurses, Youzern, New Yor

BRONZE

HONOR RO HISTORICAL TABLE Write us your requirem REED & BARTON, TAUNTO

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Two Generations of American Au

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By Brander Matthews

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candid discussion of living issues in

of the mind of Christ

The New Books.

Mail Compon to-day.

Foreig

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Books Received.

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Contributors' Gallery........

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An Associate's Reminiscences of

By the Way....

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731

BY SUBSCRIPTION $5.00 A YEAR. Single copies
15 cents each. For foreign subscription to countries
in the Postal Union, $6.56.

Address all communications to

THE OUTLOOK COMPANY

381 Fourth Avenue

CHRISTIAN CENTURY

508 S. Dearborn St, Chicag

Dear Sirs: Please enter my name! for a year's subscription to The Christie C your regular rate of $4.00 (maisters R remit upon receipt of bill and you will without extra charge a copy of of Religion," by Ellwood, or D Churches" by Leighton Parks, or the Making," by Robinson, or Means to Me," by Lyman Abbott. Name....

New York City

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HE AMERICAN NAVAL ISSION TO BRAZIL

Γ ́

HE United States Naval Mission to Brazil sailed December 9, on the Pan-American of the Munson Line. This mission is the first of its kind ever ent out by this country. It consists of sixteen naval officers and nineteen petty officers of our Navy. It is headed by Rear-Admiral Vogelgesang, Commandant of the Brooklyn Navy Yard. The sending "of this mission to Brazil has considerable political significance and should help our relations with Brazil and PanAmericanism. The French Government sent a military mission of French army officers to Brazil some time ago. There has been considerable interest in naval circles throughout the world to see what country Brazil would invite to send a naval mission to assist in reorganizing the Brazilian navy.

It is significant that Brazil chose to invite America to send this mission. The officers in the mission are men who have specialized in naval strategy, the operation of submarines, destroyers, minelaying, naval engineering, the gunnery of battleships; with an experienced aviator, a doctor, and a paymaster. The nineteen enlisted men are all the very best mechanics of our Navy and include torpedo men, radio men, engineers, turret captains, gunners' mates, machinists, aviation mechanics-in fact, skilled men

DECEMBER 20, 1922

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able to deal with any mechanical problem in the fleet. Our Secretary of State and the Brazilian Ambassador in Washington signed a formal agreement covering a period of four years as the life of the mission.

A Washington correspondent of The Outlook states that Brazil claims that her military expenditures to-day are fortyfive per cent less than they were in 1913; that she was not able during the war to do anything to strengthen her Navy and that costs during the first few years after the war' were prohibitive; so that her Navy is not sufficient even for the proper defense of her long coast-line, large area, and population. She has but two modern battleships. Brazil's delegate at the meeting of the Disarmament Commission in Geneva several months ago opposed the plan proposed for international limitation, on the ground that it would never permit Brazil to build a navy yard (she has none at present) and that it would give her insufficient national defense.

NEWS MAHAN WOULD ENJOY

HE Navy Department has announced

The Alantie a has the pacifie

fleets are to be united under a single commander. This announcement should mean much to the American people.

It is essential that our fleet, now that the race in battleship construction has

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been practically eliminated, should even more than ever be maintained at the highest level of efficiency. With the fleet divided and under separate commands, this ideal was impossible of attainment. A fleet is something more than an aggregation of ships. It must function in peace time as a unit if it is to be effective in times of National crisis. leader must not only know the vessels under his command, but must also know the personalities and the mental attitudes of his captains. They, in turn, must be familiar with the method by which their chief approaches the problems before him.

Its

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BOOKS FOR GIFTS The Outlook

My Years on the Stage

By JOHN DREW

OLIVER HERFORD writes in Life: "The glamour of the golden age of American Drama is happily reflected in the mirror of this narrative whose valuable records and commentaries together with the directness and the good style of its telling place it at the head of all the personal dramatic histories of late years." Fully illustrated, $5.00

Three Plays

By LUIGI PIRANDELLO

"Six Characters in Search of an Author," a recent success in London and a present sensation in New York, is to be produced this winter by Pitoeff in Paris and Reinhardt in Berlin and Munich. The publication of it, with two other plays also in his characteristically original and brilliant manner, has moved the critics to say that "the publication of Pirandello's Three Plays' seem to us now as important a work as the first publication of Shaw's plays." First Amer. ed. limited to 1500 copies. $3.50

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Our Unconscious Mind

By FREDERICK PIERCE

It should be read by every one interested in Autosuggestion. Very simply and clearly he describes the work of Coué and Baudouin; discusses some of the extreme claims for autosuggestion and offers a practical method for its application to everyday life.

$3.00 The Caveman Within Us By WILLIAM J. FIELDING A penetrating study of personality. Mr. Fielding shows how a lack of working adjustment between the subconscious forces of our nature and the forces of surface and social life is the cause of all kinds of minor troubles which can be eliminated.

At any bookstore, or if not, they can be had, postage extra, from

$3.00

E. P. DUTTON & CO. Publishers, 681 Fifth Ave., N. Y.

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Says President

W. H. P. Faunce

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Out of the Past...

Pictures from an Outlook Reader

The Book Table:

Two Generations of American Au

thors.....

724

By Brander Matthews

Mail Coupon to-day.

The New Books.

725

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Foreign postage extra

CHRISTIAN CENTURY

508 S. Dearborn St., Chicago

Dear Sirs: Please enter my name (a new subscriber) for a year's subscription to The Christian Century at your regular rate of $4.00 (ministers $3.00). I will remit upon receipt of bill and you will please send me without extra charge a copy of of Religion," by Ellwood, or Churches," by Leighton Parks, the Making," by Robinson, or Means to Me," by Lyman Abbott.

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THE AMERICAN NAVAL MISSION TO BRAZIL

T

HE United States Naval Mission to Brazil sailed December 9, on the Pan-American of the Munson Line. This mission is the first of its kind ever sent out by this country. It consists of sixteen naval officers and nineteen petty officers of our Navy. It is headed by Rear-Admiral Vogelgesang, Commandant of the Brooklyn Navy Yard. The sending of this mission to Brazil has considerable political significance and should help our relations with Brazil and PanAmericanism. The French Government sent a military mission of French army officers to Brazil some time ago. There has been considerable interest in naval circles throughout the world to see what country Brazil would invite to send a naval mission to assist in reorganizing the Brazilian navy.

DECEMBER 20, 1922

It is significant that Brazil chose to invite America to send this mission. The officers in the mission are men who have specialized in naval strategy, the operation of submarines, destroyers, minelaying, naval engineering, the gunnery of battleships; with an experienced aviator, a doctor, and a paymaster. The nineteen enlisted men are all the very best mechanics of our Navy and include torpedo men, radio men, engineers, turret captains, gunners' mates, machinists, aviation mechanics-in fact, skilled men

able to deal with any mechanical problem in the fleet. Our Secretary of State and the Brazilian Ambassador in Washington signed a formal agreement covering a period of four years as the life of the mission.

A Washington correspondent of The Outlook states that Brazil claims that her military expenditures to-day are fortyfive per cent less than they were in 1913; that she was not able during the war to do anything to strengthen her Navy and that costs during the first few years after the war were prohibitive; so that her Navy is not sufficient even for the proper defense of her long coast-line, large area, and population. She has but two modern battleships. Brazil's dele gate at the meeting of the Disarmament Commission in Geneva several months ago opposed the plan proposed for international limitation, on the ground that it would never permit Brazil to build a navy yard (she has none at present) and that it would give her insufficient national defense.

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THE NAVAL

COMMISSION
APPOINTED
TO CONFER

WITH THE

BRAZILIAN GOVERNMENT Front row, left to right: Captain L. M. Overstreet, Captain Thomas E. Kearney, Rear-Admiral Vogelgesang, head of the Commission; Captain J. J. Cheatham, Commander V. S. Rossiter, Commander A. W. Fitch. Back row, left to right: Commodore D. G. Ellyson,

Commodore A. T. Beauregard, Lieutenant J. D. Pennington, Commodore R. S. Holmes,

Lieutenant P. S. Carrol. An article by Captain Overstreet entitled "Naval Strategy as Affected by Aircraft and Battleships" will be published in an early issue of The Outlook

[graphic]

been practically eliminated, should even more than ever be maintained at the highest level of efficiency. With the fleet divided and under separate commands, this ideal was impossible of attainment. A fleet is something more than an aggregation of ships. It must function in peace time as a unit if it is to be effective in times of National crisis. Its leader must not only know the vessels under his command, but must also know the personalities and the mental attitudes of his captains. They, in turn, must be familiar with the method by which their chief approaches the problems before him.

Under Secretary Daniels all this advantage was thrown away by the adoption of a policy of division which the naval history of every nation has shown to be fallacious. The new order not only means increased naval efficiency, but it also assures the American people that politics will not govern the disposition of their first line of defense.

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