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An Unusual Service for Outlook Readers

You are frequently in need of a household helper, companion, nurse, governess, teacher, or business or professional assistant. Or perhaps you are in search

of such a position yourself.

In either case, an Outlook "Want Ad" will un

doubtedly solve the problem. Here is a typical
extract from a letter just received-"I had not an-
ticipated that my ad would prove so alluring. I
received twenty-four replies and they came from
thirteen different States. It has given me a great
respect for the wide circulation of The Outlook."

Try a "Want Ad.”

The rate is only Ten Cents a Word.

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Department of Classified Advertising
THE OUTLOOK COMPANY

381 Fourth Avenue

New York City

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STATIONERY

UNUSUALLY desirable stationery for any type of correspondence. 200 sheets high grade note paper and 100 envelopes printed with your name and address postpaid $1.50. Samples on request. You can buy cheaper stationery, but do you want to? Lewis, 284 Second Ave., Troy, N. Y.

150 letter sheets and 100 envelopes, $1. Postpaid. Burnett Print Shop, Box 145, Ashland, O. OLD Hampshire bond: 100 sheets (61⁄44x7) and 75 envelopes, printed. $2 delivered. Franklin Printery, Warner, N. H.

HELP WANTED

Professional Situations WANTED-Graduate nurse, executive and social service training. Salary $1,800. Trade union industrial and preventive health work. Painters Health Department, 80 East 11th St., New York.

Business Situations

GOVERNMENT needs railway mail clerks, $133 to $192 month. Write for free specimen questions. Columbus Institute, B-4, Columbus, Ohio.

WANTED: AGENTS-men or women; patented household articles of merit, unusual line. Exclusive territory. No competition. Profits 100%. Opportunity for sales crew connection. Longmanagers, permanent established, reliable concern. Write Hamp den Toy Co., Factory No. 15, Westfield, Mass. WANTED-Resident office assistant, knowl edge of stenography and typewriting. Well educated, conscientious, pleasing personality. State age, qualifications, references and salary expected. Location Hudson Valley, one hour from New York City. 2,941, Outlook. Companions and Domestic Helpers WORKING housekeeper-Family of four and governess. Cooking: waiting; no washing. References. Telephone Scarsdale 283, or P. O. Box 54, Scarsdale, N. Y. WANTED. Young woman to act as mother's helper and assist in care and training of four small children. Ridgewood, N. J. 2,943, Outlook.

WORKING housekeeper-Family of three. Small house. Cooking. Protestant. Box 314, Scarsdale, N. I.

HELP WANTED

Companions and Domestic Helpers WILL pay liberal wages to an experienced white couple, who appreciate a good home in the country and are agreeable and willing; wife to do the cooking and man to act as butler and have full charge of the first floor; family consists of two adults and three children. None but those who have had experience and can furnish references need apply. Answer, stating experience, references, and wages desired. Address "B. W.," P. O. Box 822, City Hall Station, New York.

ABOUT December 1, young woman 30 to 40 years as nurse-companion to semi-invalid. Must be able to read aloud. References and personal interview in New York necessary. Box 245, Morristown, N. J.

WANTED-Woman of refinement to take
charge of six-room apartment for family of
two, doing all work except laundry. All home
privileges. Protestant desired. 2,924, Outlook.

Teachers and Governesses
MAN or woman to head department of edu-
cation in Southern college for women, work
beginning November 15. Woman to teach
high school French. College graduates; fine
salaries. The Interstate Teachers' Agency,
Macheca Building, New Orleans, La.
WANTED-Young nursery governess for
New York in winter.
little girl of four.
2,942, Outlook.

SITUATIONS WANTED

Professional Situations TRAINED nuse, R. N., widow, is at liberty to take resident or traveling position. References. Box 116, St. Davids, Pa.

PROFESSIONAL nurse, refined, capable, desires position with elderly person or invalid. Experienced traveler. Best credentials. 2.918, Outlook.

Business Situations

SITUATIONS WANTED

Business Situations

COLLEGE man, knowledge of forestry, desires semi-executive position on gentleman's estate. Surroundings more important than salary. 2,939, Outlook.

PART TIME WORK WANTED. Colum-
bia law student, 27, seeks occupation after-
noons, evenings. Clerical, secretarial, teach-
ing, companionship: any kind of intelligent
service. 2,922, Outlook.

PRIVATE accounts kept, bills paid, etc.
Full time one person. part two or more. For
Detroit only. No typewriting, stenography,
or telephoning. 2,938, Outlook.

YOUNG man, colored, intelligent, polite,
pleasing address, desires position messenger
or attendant, bank or business firm. Best
reference. 2,931, Outlook.

SOCIAL or private secretary. Six years in same family, French and English. Highest business and social references. 2,932, Outlook.

EXPERIENCED cafeteria, tea-room manager desires position. 2,935, Outlook.

SECRETARY-stenographer. Trained expert. Cultured young woman. Ten years' experience, including editorial and positions of trust. Highest references. 2,920, Outlook. Companions and Domestic Helpers MATRON of girls' school wishes change of situation at Christmas. Would travel or consider any position of trust. American and Canadian references. 2,245, Outlook.

YOUNG woman, Protestant, social and business experience America and Europe, speaking French, desires position as chaperon, courier, secretary. 2,876, Outlook.

INDUSTRIAL position desired by gradu-
ate, registered nurse of long experience.
2,887, Outlook.

WANTED-Position as supervising house-
keeper by experienced woman of ability, edu-
cation, refinement. Pleasing personality. Last
position held eight years. 2,892, Outlook.
GENTLEWOMAN desires position-com-
panion, social secretary, hostess.
Outlook.

2,936.

FARM SUPERINTENDENT - Woman
with 15 years' experience in farm manage-
ment, and a student of horticulture in Eng-
land and U. S. State agricultural colleges,
wishes positiontomanage an estate with up-to-
date dairy and poultry plant. 2,890, Outlook. LADY desires position as companion-house-
PRIVATE secretary, woman, desires posi-keeper with elderly lady or two or three
tion of trust and responsibility. 2,940, Outlook. business women. 2,937, Outlook.

SITUATIONS WANTED

Teachers and Governesses SCHOOL. Gentleman and wife, both with long experience in school work, seek good position Christmas, or would start sinall school. 2,894, Outlook.

FRENCH governess, Protestant, excellent references, thoroughly experienced and reliable, wants post. Would travel. Mademoiselle Fouquet, 46 Myrtle St., Bloomfield, N. J.

EXPERIENCED lady teacher. English, history, domestic science. 2,934, Outlook.

MISCELLANEOUS

TO young women desiring training in the care of obstetrical patients a very thorough nurses' aid course of six months is offered by the Lying-In Hospital, 307 Second Ave., New York. Monthly allowance and full mainte nance is furnished. For further information address Directress of Nurses.

MISS Guthman. New York shopper, will shop for you, services free. No samples. References. 309 West 99th St.

BOYS wanted. 500 boys wanted to sell The Outlook each week. No investment necessary, Write for selling plan, Carrier Department. The Outlook Company, 381 Fourth Ave. New York City.

RED GLASS-Collection of old Bohemian and old English red glass at private sale. A collector's collection covering years. 2,899 Outlook.

TYPING of manuscripts or other matter by well qualified woman. 2,911, Outlook.

SLEEP on a genuine Adirondack Mt. Bal sam Pine Pillow. SOOTHING! REFRESH ING!! INVIGORATING!!! (Beautifying) Size 12" x 16" $1.35 postpaid. Pine Pillow Co., Inwood Sta., N. Y., Box 14c.

LADY in suburbs would take one or tw children to board. Protestant. 2,928, Outlook INDIVIDUAL care and instruction for ex ceptional children in beautitul country home Ideal conditions for mental and physical de velopment. Professional references. 2.91 Outlook.

SMALL family living in a very comfortabl home, well situated, desires to communicat with one or two ladies as paying Address E. D. L., Box 67, Lakehurs

WINTER VACATION VOYAGES

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WEST INDIES

MEGANTIC (20,000 tons displacement) Jan. 15, Feb. 17, Mar. 22, 1923 Magnificent cruising ship of admirable construction for tropic voyages. Premier steamer to the West Indies.

Rates $250 Upwards

Itinerary arranged by Cruise Department of more than 25 years' experience in the West Indies. From New York to Havana, Haiti, Santiago, Kingston (Port Antonio), Panama Canal (Panama City), La Guaira (Caracas), Trinidad (La Brea), Barbados, Martinque (St. Pierre), St. Thomas, San Juan, Nassau, Bermuda.

A wonderful, health-giving holiday among the brilliant lands and sunshine seas beneath the Southern Cross.

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Frank's CRUISE de LUXE Mediterranean

(Limited to 450 Guests-About Half Capacity)

By Magnificent New Cunard S.S. "SCYTHIA," Specially Chartered

Twin-Screw Turbine Oil-Burner, 20,000 Tons. Sailing Jan. 30, 1923, returning April 2, visiting

Egypt, Madeira, Spain, Portugal, Gibraltar, Algiers, Tunis, Holy Land, Turkey, Greece, Italy, Sicily, Riviera, Monte Carlo, etc.

The "Scythia" is a veritable floating palace, with spacious decks, lounges, veranda cafés, ? elevators, commodious staterooms with running water and large wardrobes; bedrooms and suites with private baths. The famous Cunard cuisine and service. (Only one sitting for meals.) Free optional return passage at later date by any Cunard steamer from France or England. Rates, deck plans, itinerary and full information on request. Early reservations advisable.

Also De Luxe Tours to Europe, South
America, Japan, China and California

FRANK TOURIST CO.

489 Fifth Ave., New York Established 1875 219 So. 15th St., Philadelphia

BY THE WAY

HE caption-writer of the London

TuSphere seems not to have been

around the globe much, notwithstanding the title of his paper. In a recent issue he says that the Municipal Building of New York City is "situated on the 'Great White Way' of the American capital"!

The President of the Harvard Club of Singapore writes from that antipodean port to the "Harvard Alumni Bulletin" that his club is small but flourishing, and is doing what it can to advance the interests of Harvard on that side of the world. To this end, he says, a small model of the John Harvard statue has been placed in the office of the Colonial Secretary for the Straits Settlement," "where it is doing a great deal to remove the impression generally current among official Britons that Harvard is merely the name of a beer." Furthermore, he announces, a large photograph of the last Harvard-Yale football game has been hung in the club-house of the Dyak Head Hunters Association of North Borneo, where it is arousing enthusiastic interest among the young and enterprising head hunters, who believe that they could pick up some valuable hints dur- | ing a course at Harvard.

Athletes, owing perhaps to their severe training and strenuous exertions, are often short-lived. An exception to this rule, if it is a rule, is furnished by the career of Henry E. Buermeyer, who recently died at the age of eighty-four. He was one of the founders of the New York Athletic Club and the first amateur champion heavyweight boxer of the United States. In his prime he could put up two ninety-eight pound dumbbells at the same time, could lift 1,250 pounds from the floor, and could run a hundred yards in 104 seconds. He held more than fifty medals which he had won in athletic events of various sorts.

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In "Studies of the Chinese Drama," by Kate Buss, it is said that in Chinese theaters the pleasant custom obtains of collecting the admission fee during the evening after those persons who may not find themselves interested in the performance have had time to depart. In other cases money may be tossed upon the stage at the end of a performance. All Chinese theaters, it is remarked, have certain unhygienic customs such as a common use of wet towels, passed about to "refresh" the audience; the omnipotent teacup; and the unfreshened air. Stands for teapots and cups are within reach of everybody, and tea is served continuously; even an actor may be offered a cup of tea while playing, if his part is difficult or prolonged.

The so-called evil smells of China, the author of the above-quoted book observes, are traditional, and give pleasure to the Chinaman, whose idea of sweet and foul differs from our own. The

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Chinaman's scent perception is more highly developed than the Westerner's, it seems; we cultivate mainly sight and hearing, while the Chinese revel in "sweet" odors that to us are objectionable.

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"On two successive pages of your issue of October 4," a subscriber writes, "an incorrect quotation occurs-'He who runs may read.' The passage from which this is taken is in the Bible, Habakkuk ii. 2, 'And the Lord answered me and said, Write the vision, and make it plain upon tables, that he may run that readeth it.' As annotated in the Scofield Reference Bible, 'that he may run that readeth-i. e., as a messenger of the vision.'"

This is doubtless a correct interpretation of the Scripture; but our quotations have the sanction of usage as crystallized by the poets. Cowper, for instance: But truths on which depends our main concern,

That 'tis our shame and misery not to learn,

Shine by the side of every path we tread

With such a luster he that runs may read.

And Tennyson:

Read my little fable:

He that runs may read.

Most can raise the flowers now,
For all have got the seed.

An "anti-feminist reaction" is noted in the "Woman Citizen" as gaining force in several countries, among them Great Britain. As illustrating the point, it is said that a woman physician, who until recently held a position as adviser at a maternity clinic in England, was dismissed when she married!

America does not share in the reaction above noted by the "Woman Citizen," for it continues to give women greater advantages. The latest privilege conferred by a new Federal law, according to the "Citizen," gives the alien-born woman the opportunity of becoming an American citizen after only one year's residence. It takes away from her, however, the easy method of becoming a citizen by annexing a native husband. The law, fortunately, is not retroactive, and foreign-born women who have been forehanded in acquiring citizenship through the marital method will not lose their standing as citizens.

San Francisco has more hotels than any other city in the United States except New York, according to a recent report of the Hotel Association. It has only four houses, however, of the "first capacity"-hotels having more than 450 rooms. Of these New York has 18, Chicago 11, Los Angeles 5; Boston, Cleveland, Detroit, Minneapolis, New Orleans, and Pittsburgh each have three; Cincinnati, St. Louis, and Washington have two; Philadelphia has one. Atlantic City and Saratoga, strangely enough, are not included in this list.

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Outlook

for groups of students engaged in the study of current events, history, civics, English, etc. Information as to special rates for subscriptions ordered in quantities for class work will be sent on request to

published each week based on that week's issue of The Outlook and is sent without charge to all subscribers who request it, but is especially designed Educational Director, THE OUTLOOK COMPANY, 381 Fourth Avenue, New York City

W. L.DOUGLAS

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$5 $6 $7 &$8 SHOES and WOMEN

W. L. Douglas shoes are, actually demanded
year after year by more people than
any other shoe in the world.
W.L.DOUGLAS constant endeavor for forty years has
been to make the best shoes possible
for the price. Protection against unreasonable profits
is guaranteed by the price stamped on every pair.
THEY ARE MADE of the best and finest leathers,

by skilled shoemakers, all work-
ing to make the best shoes for the price that money
can buy. The quality is unsurpassed. The smart styles
are the leaders in the fashion centers of America.

W.L. DOUGLAS shoes are sold in 110 of our own
stores in the large cities and by
shoe dealers everywhere. Ask your shoe dealer to
show you W. L. Douglas shoes. Only by examining
them can you appreciate their value. Refuse substi-
tutes. Insist upon having W. L. Douglas shoes with
the retail price and the name stamped on the sole.
The retail prices are the same everywhere.
If not for sale in your vicinity, write for catalog.
TO MERCHANTS: If no dealer in your town
handles W. L. Douglas shoes, write today
for exclusive rights to handle this quick
selling, quick turn-over line.

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President

W. L. Douglas Shoe Co, 167 Spark St. Brockton, Mass.

Boys Shoes $4.00 & $4.50

W. L. Douglas name and portrait is the best known shoe Trade Mark in the world. It stands for the highest standard of quality at the lowest possible cost. The name and price is plainly stamped on the sole.

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Says Rev. Charles W. Gilkey: "No other religious journal has contributed, either to my thinking, preaching or living, anything like the wealth of guidance and inspiration that I find in The Christian Century.”

Prof. Harry F. Ward: "I consider The Christian Century the most promising venture in the field of religious journalism in the English-speaking world." Rev. Charles E. Jefferson: "Wherever I go among men, east and west, I find they are reading your journal."

Pres. W. H. P. Faunce: "I read every paragraph in The Christian Century every week with constantly growing satisfaction. Here is a journal that puts first things first and leaves the petty things far out on the circumference."

Rev. Cornelius Woelfkin: "The Christian Century is the only publication which comes to my home which gets a reading straight through upon its arrival." Dr. Sherwood Eddy: "Among the few journals that have stood for complete social justice and a full social gospel, The Christian Century holds a unique place."

Pres. Ozora S. Davis: "There are some things that a man cannot get along without in these days; The Christian Century is one of them. You are fearless and constructive and are leading the way." Bishop Francis J. McConnell: "I regard The Christian Century as the greatest journalistic force working for social and international righteousness coming from any press of the Christian Church."

Some Notable Contributors:

FRANCIS J. McCONNELL
WILLIAM L. STIDGER

CHARLES E. JEFFERSON
FREDERICK W. NORWOOD
WILLIAM E. BARTON
JOHN R. MOTT
JOHN M. COULTER
SHERWOOD EDDY
ERNEST F. TITTLE
ROBERT E. SPEER

ALBERT PARKER FITCH

WILLIAM ADAMS BROWN

JANE ADDAMS

HENRY CHURCHILL KING

PAUL HUTCHINSON

JOHN SPARGO

HARRY EMERSON FOSDICK
ALVA W. TAYLOR
RUFUS M. JONES

JOHN R. EWERS

FREDERICK F. SHANNON
EDGAR DE WITT JONES
JOSEPH ERNEST MCAFEE
LLOYD C. DOUGLAS
CHARLES A. ELLWOOD
H. D. C. MACLACHLAN
WINFRED E. GARRISON
LYNN HAROLD HOUGH
DEAN W. R. INGE

MAUDE ROYDEN

EDWARD SCRIBNER AMES

ORVIS F. JORDAN

SHAILER MATHEWS

SAMUEL MCCOMB

ROGER BABSON

VIDA D. SCUDDER

JOSEPH FORT NEWTON
CLELAND B. MCAFEE

Dr. John Dewey's

criticism of China's Missionary Schools appeared in the New Republic some months ago.

"American missionary education [in China] has failed," thus Dr. Dewey quotes a Chinese student, "to develop independent energetic thought and character among even its most distinguished graduates. It has produced rather a subservient intellectual type, one which is characterized as slavish."

Dr. Guy W. Sarvis,

Professor of Economics and Sociology in the University of Nanking, replies to Dr. Dewey's criticism in one of the most trenchant and informing articles on Christian educational ideals in China that has yet appeared.

"Many of us who are in missionary educational work in China
are former students of Dr. Dewey or enthusiastic followers of
his educational and philosophical doctrines. We believe he de-
sires to aid China in every possible way. We do not understand
why, on the basis of assumption and hearsay, he has used the
weight of his influence to damage institutions which, with all
their imperfections, are making possible the most important con-
tribution of America to China."

Dr. Sarvis' reply will appear in a forthcoming issue of The
Christian Century.

"CHRISTIANIZING PUBLIC OPINION"

By SAMUEL MCCREA CAVERT

The educational function of Christianity is not accomplished until the public opinion of the social order has itself been made Christian, so says Dr. Cavert in two articles about to appear in The Christian Century. These articles illuminate the concept of the social responsibility of the church.

"STUDIES IN SIN"

By H. D. C. MACLACHLAN

Using Tolstoi, Ibsen, Browning, Kipling, Bernard Shaw, Strindberg, Dostoiefsky, and A. S. M. Hutchinson as his background, Dr. Maclachlan is now beginning a series of articles on such subjects as "The Sin Against the Holy Ghost," "Sin and Atonement," "The Sin of Immaturity," "The Sin of the Secret Wish," "Sinning at Long Range," "Second Hand Sinning," "Sin and Punishment," and "Sin and Social Conventions." This will be a remarkable interpretation of literature and a unique discussion of the modern conception of sin.

"CHRIST AND MODERN LIFE"

Running currently with all other good things, the editors will continue to discuss and interpret the social aspects of the Christian gospel. Editorials and articles on such themes as these will be appearing each week:

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THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY,

508 S. Dearborn St., Chicago Dear Sirs: Please enter my name (a new subscriber) for a year's subscription to The Christian I Century at your regular rate of $4.00 (ministers $3.00). I will remit upon receipt of bill and you will please send me without extra charge a copy of D "The Reconstruction of Religion," by Ellwood, or "The Crisis of the Churches," by Leighton Parks, or "Creative Christianity," by George Cross, or "The Creative Christ," by Drown, or "Toward the Understanding of Jesus," by Simkhovitch, or "What and Where Is God?" by Swain, or "The Mind in the Making," by Robinson.

Name..

THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 508 S. Dearborn St., Chicago

Dear Sirs: Enclosed please find $1 for a twelve weeks' acquaintance subscription to The Christian Century.

Name

Address

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