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Recent Dutton Books

An Astounding Tale of Adventure Beasts, Men and Gods

By FERDINAND OSSENDOWSKI Pole whose life had Dr. Ossendowski, a been that of a scientist, a Professor, a prominent public official in old Russia, was forced to fly from Bolshevik assassins into the wild life of the Yenisei forests, in a sub-arctic winter with practically no outfit but an ax, a rifle and some cartridges. His story of a marvellous journey of thousands of miles, of hairbreadth escapes, and of visits to the inmost sanctuary of "the living Buddha," is told with obvious sincerity, with the lucid precision of a scientist, and with a restraint that is amazing. DR. ALBERT SHAW, Editor of The Review of Reviews, says of it: "I consider it the most extraordinarily interesting manuscript I have passed under my exe, for. years." Price, $3.00. postage extra.

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During the two centuries elapsed since Walpole, who called Prime Minister, there have been thirty-six holders of this office, and they represent a fascinating study in characand In this useful entertaining a brilliant volume Mr. Bigham gives character sketch of biographical and each. Handsomely illustrated from pho$8.00 tographs.

ter.

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New Gliding Records One Law for All.

A Flexible Tariff.

Is Ireland Leaderless ?..

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$5.00

Where Americanization Gets Rubbed Off 28 By Gino Speranza

A Plea for the Platitude.. By Brander Matthews

29

An Itinerant Merry-Go-Round in New York City

31

Photographs by Henry Hoyt Moore

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A preliminary survey of the half century from 1870 to 1920. A sequel to this brilliant writer's "Re-making of Modern Europe," invaluable for the reader who wishes to bring into right proportions his knowledge of foreign politics, or to review the background and probe the diplomatic origins of the World War.

$3.00

The Gain of Personality

By W. CHARLES LOOSMORE
Author of "Nerves and the Man"

A popular psychological statement of the practical value of personality in every $2.50 walk of life.

Any bookstore, or if not, they can be had, postage extra, from E. P. DUTTON & CO. Publishers, 681 Fifth Ave., N. Y.

3535

Can Unemployment Be Reduced ?.... 35 By Ernest G. Draper

By the Way....

39

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Long course of eleven months, beginning October 2, 19 Lectures by notable librarians, assigned reading and pra tice work in the library. Short courses winter and summes For further particulars address The Librarian, as above. The McCarter School

Cranford, New Jersey For little children from four to eight years of age. Ideal Alice McCarter home and school life.

Normal Training Deponent Ethical Culture School

For young women desiring training in kindergar ten, new types of elementary school teaching and the expressive arts of the school. Faculty of specialists. School opens September 18th.

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YONKERS, NEW YORK Registered in New York State. offers a 2 years' course as general training to refined, educated women. Require! mente one year high school or its equivalent. Apply to the Directress of Nurees, Yonkers, New York.

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CURTISS AVIATION BOOK. Glenn
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LIGHTNING CONDUCTOR DISCOVERS AMERICA. C. N. and A. M. Williamson. A delightful Cloth. tale of mystery and travel. 384 p. Was $2. Our Price, Ppd. 87c THESE TWAIN. Arnold Bennett. Most interesting of all his books. Cloth. 520 p. Was $1.50. Our Price, Ppd. 746 MCEWAN'S EASY SHORTHAND A vest pocket manual for busy people. Was 75c. Cloth. Our Price, Ppd.

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EVOLUTIONIST'S LIBRARY. Bry-
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A HISTORY OF ENGLISH BAL-
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BE AN ARTIST

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The Autobiography of a Dog

By MARSHALL SAUNDERS
Revised Edition, Illustrated. $1.50-now ready.
Written for children-read by adults, too.
At your Bookstore, or

New York State. But of most impor tance, in the light of his Outlook article at least, is his association with the State Immigration Commission and his former directorship of the Prison Association of New York, established by the Society for THE JUDSON PRESS, 1701 Chestnut St., Phila. ■Italian Immigrants. Mr. Speranza's article on immigration is the first of a series of three which The Outlook intends publishing shortly. The other two I are by Miss Natalie De Bogory and Mr. Carleton Beals.

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Economical Heat Control For Every Type of Building

Adsco Heating saves 20% to 30% of all fuel cost and gives perfect heating comfort in hotels, Y. M. C. As., office-buildings, factories or residences. Low pressure steam or vapor can be supplied from any make of individual boiler in each building or from a central steam plant supplying a group of buildings through underground mains. Hot water systems can easily be changed over to Adsco Heating.

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SEPTEMBER 6, 1922

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OW will the business of the coun-
try be stimulated; how will the
revenues of the railways be af-
fected; and what percentage of increase
will there be in travel by rail, as a re-
sult of the bill signed by President Har-
ding a few days ago, directing the Inter-
Commission,
State Commerce

after

notice and hearing, to require railways
to issue interchangeable mileage books
or scrip coupon tickets?

These are the interesting questions
which are raised in connection with this
bill, urged by the commercial travelers'
associations as a means of getting more
salesmen out on the road, thereby help-
ing to improve business conditions gen-
erally. The Inter-State Commerce Com-
mission, which is directed by the bill to
fix "just and reasonable rates" to be
charged for such interchangeable mile-
age, as well as to make other regula-
tions governing its issuance and use,
will hold hearings on the subject the
latter part of next month, having set
September 26 for this purpose.

While the railways did not make any
strong opposition to the passage of the
bill, they are known to be doubtful as
to whether there will be sufficiently
increased percentage of travel to make
up for the losses they will sustain
through the reduction in rates which, it
is expected, will be granted to pur-
chasers of the interchangeable mileage,
and which was the real object sought in
the bill.

The rate which has been suggested
tentatively for these books is 2.5 cents
a mile, as against the present basic
rate on most of the railways of the
country of 3.6 cents a mile. It has been
estimated by railway officials that they
will have to increase their passenger
business by more than forty per cent in
order to make up for the loss of revenue
suffered through this rate reduction.
The New England roads, a large per-
centage of whose receipts is derived
from their passenger traffic, would have
to see a particularly large gain in this
class of business in order to make up for
the loss through reduced rates. In addi-
tion, increased expenditures by the roads
will be necessitated; and there seems to
be much doubt as to whether the net
revenues of the roads will be improved.
The carriers of the country have not

(C) Harris & Ewing

PRESIDENT HARDING SIGNING THE MILEAGE SCRIP BILL
This bill authorizes interchangeable mileage books for use over the different railway systems

been earning the dividend rate to which
they were entitled under the Transpor-
tation Act; and any measure which is
likely still further to reduce their earn-
ing capacity must be given most careful
consideration before it is finally put into
operation through direction of the Inte
State Commerce Commission.

The Commission, therefore, is expected
to go fully into the question of the rate
to be charged for the interchangeable
mileage; whether it shall be transfer-
able or non-transferable; what rules and
regulations shall be required for the
issuance and use of these tickets; and
to what baggage privileges holders of
such .tickets shall be entitled.

As indicated by Commissioner Esch,
of the Inter-State Commerce Commis-
sion, when he appeared at the hearings
held on the bill before the House Com-
mittee on Inter-State and Foreign Com-
merce, the Commission did not show
itself strongly in favor of this legişla-
tion. He said they had hoped to find it
possible to reduce fares and freight rates
"in such a manner that all our people
could enjoy the benefits of such reduc-
tions." He declared that the reduction
in fares to a special class, as the pur-
chasers of interchangeable mileage
tickets would be, materially reducing
the revenues of carriers, would make it
more difficult to order a general reduc-
tion in passenger fares which might be

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cally proposed that Mexico should control the United States in the interest of humanity and law. One of the reasons adduced was the Herrin massacre. If Americans do not want to be considered lawless by Mexicans, it behooves them to insist, and continue to insist, that the slaughter of twenty-three men in the Herrin mines last June should lead to the indictment and trial of its perpetrators.

Every move in that direction is of public interest. The State of Illinois is not unaware of the ill fame attaching to this crime, and through its AttorneyGeneral, its State Chamber of Commerce, and its press is urging action. Through State effort a special Grand Jury has at last been impaneled in Williamson County, and as an aid to non-partisanship in feeling neither miners nor operators were included in the panel.

The circuit judge's charge to the Grand Jury, as summarized by a newspaper correspondent, was in part "a defense of this county and its law officers,

5

a challenge to critics everywhere, and an exposition of the law."

It is to be hoped that this judge added a vigorous injunction to the Grand Jury to pursue murderers unflinchingly.

THE KU KLUX AND POLITICS

TH

HERE has been much discussion as to the influence of the Ku Klux Klan in the political situation. Sensationalists have been inclined to exaggerate it. In National matters it is practically nil; in the East and the Southeast it is negligible; in the West and Southwest it has had local effects in different ways, but has not acted consistently or for definite issues.

An example of this was seen the other day in the announcement that in Texas Earle Mayfield, "Ku Klux candidate," as the newspapers called him, had won in the "run off" primary for the United States Senatorship which followed the first primary, in which six candidates engaged. An examination of the facts shows that his Ku Klux support was only a minor matter. The Ku Klux candidates for State offices made a poor showing and were defeated by large majorities. The prohibition issue was prominent in the State campaign. Mayfield was "dry." His opponent, Ferguson, was "moderately wet;" and the fact that when Governor he was impeached and removed from office told heavily against him. If the Texas primary showed anything, it was that Mayfield was the stronger man personally, and that the prohibition sentiment is still strong in Texas. It is even intimated that the Democratic situation is so unsatisfactory in Texas that a good liberal Republican might have a chance.

There have been some queer developments in the Ku Klux Klan. Thus in Georgia it has been alleged that Negroes were being asked to join, and in New York it has been charged that the Negro "Moses," Marcus Garvey, had been approached by the Klan. There are many indications that the Ku Klux is soon to pass away as a disturbing element. Yet nct many weeks ago newspaper accounts stated that "a crowd totaling nearly 30,000 from Chicago and northern Illincis gathered to witness the initiation of nearly 3,000 new members into the secret council of the Ku Klux Klan. The ceremonies were performed in an immense field three miles northwest of Springfield. Similar ceremonials, celebrating the initiation of tens of thousands of new members, have taken place in other parts of the country."

Officially the Ku Klux has promised not to wear its regalia in night raids and disclaims any intention of regulating supposed evil-doers by violence. As a terrorizing agency it is practically dead.

But its attractiveness to the great class of "joiners" is strong, for it combines mystery and publicity uniquely; it is a "secret society" which, as the Chicago incident above quoted shows, thrives on flashlight photographs and press notices.

TH

A NAVY ON THE SCRAP HEAP HE "scrapping of navies" is a new industry in the world. In the past the business has been of the single-order variety; it has never been carried on in a wholesale manner. "The old order changeth," however, and now the breaking up of battleships and cruisers and destroyers is to be performed on a grand scale. A beginning already has been made.

While the naval treaty which was signed by the United States, Great Britain, France, Italy, and Japan at the Washington Conference on the Limitation of Armaments has not yet been ratified by all the Powers signatory thereto, the United States already has sold two of the old battleships which were on the list of capital ships to be scrapped and is preparing to ask bids within the next sixty days on five other vessels of the same class.

The two battleships which already have been sold are the Maine and the Missouri, with the exception of the Wisconsin, also on the junk pile in the yards of Henry A. Hitner's Sons, in Philadelphia, the oldest vessels of the larger fighting class in the Navy; and it is stated that both of them would have been disposed of even if there had been no naval treaty. Nevertheless they are among the twenty-eight American battleships listed for scrapping in the

Α'

RT knows no class distinctions. No two men in civilized society could be farther apart in environment and tradition than a New England farmer and a royal prince of Europe; and no two men could be more distantly removed from the stage type of artist with flowing tie and bohemian tastes. Yet John Lillie, farmer, of Dorset, Vermont, and Prince Eugen of Sweden have in common the love of art and the gift of creating beauty with paint and canvas. As a landscape painter each is among the most interesting and original of contemporary artists. Next week The Outlook will publish an article about John Lillie by Zéphine Humphrey. Week after next The Outlook will publish an article about Prince Eugen by H. G. Leach. Each article will be illustrated with reproductions of the artist's paintings.

treaty assented to by the five great naval Powers in Washington on February 1 last.

The five other battleships on that list which, it is announced, are to be put up for sale in the immediate future are the Georgia, Rhode Island, Nebraska, Virginia, and New Jersey, all of which have seen seventeen years of service. The Maine and the Missouri, of 12,500 tons each, had been in the Navy for almost twenty years past. The Wisconsin, sold previous to the Armament Conference, had seen more than twenty-one years of service.

In addition to the battleships, a large number of other vessels have been sold recently by the Navy, although not as a result of the naval treaty. Many of them were old and useless and would have been sold anyway, while others were disposed of because of the post-war paring down of the Navy and because of the necessity for economy.

Most of the vessels recently sold by the Navy for scrapping have been bought and are now in the Delaware River yards of the Henry A. Hitner's Sons Company, in the northern suburbs of Philadelphia. This concern, the principal one in the United States engaged in the business of navy scrapping, now has in its possession quite a formidable modern armada. It includes, in addition to the three battleships named, two cruisers, eleven torpedo-boat destroyers, four monitors, eight submarines, about one hundred and forty sub-chasers, several colliers, tugs, and mine planters.

In all, it is a fleet with a tonnage of approximately 125,000. As navies go nowadays, this doomed navy is perhaps not large, but there are important nations with navies much smaller in ton. nage. At the beginning of the European War the smallest of the Great Power navies was that of Italy, which was of 285,460 tonnage, not much more than twice the tonnage of the "Hitner Fleet."

The great part of navy scrapping, not only for the United States, but for the other nations signatory to the FivePower Treaty, still remains to be done; and when the full fleet of heavy-tonned capital ships which are to be discarded upon final ratification of the naval treaty are thrown upon the market this newborn industry of turning battleships wholesale into the crucible for peacetime purposes will receive a new impulse and make some of the short-lived navies thus formed formidable indeed.

A PIONEER IN

PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE

T is natural that public interest in Dr.

Istephen Smith should be centered in

the fact that when he died the other day he was within a few months of com

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