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ANTI-SLAVERY

R E P O R T E R.

VOLUME I. NEW SERIES, 1846.

UNDER THE SANCTION OF THE BRITISH AND FOREIGN ANTI-SLAVERY SOCIETY.

LONDON:

PUBLISHED BY PETER JONES BOLTON, No. 8, KENNINGTON TERRACE;

SOLD BY W. EVERETT, 14, FINCH LANE, CORNHILL ;

AND TO BE HAD AT THE OFFICE OF THE BRITISH AND FOREIGN ANTI-SLAVERY SOCIETY,

27, NEW BROAD STREET.

IN D E X.

A.
Anti-slavery cause, retrospect of, 1. , British Guiana-

Crowning crime of Christendom,
Anti-Slavery League, 162, 166, 180.
murders in, 168;

poem on, 58.
Abolition of slavery-
Anti-slavery lodgings, 112.

new ordinances of, 29, 62 ; Cruising system on the West Coast
generally, 32;
Anti-slavery meetings-
population of, 78;

of Africa, 140.
in Tunis, 31, 38, 40.
at Belfast, 77;

taxation of, 78.

Cuba-
Abolition principles-

at Birmingham, 125 ;

British India, alleged slavery in, 193. general intelligence from, 63.
in Belfast, 206 ;

at Cambridge, 61 ;

Brock, Rev. W., letter of, to the mines in, 26, 47.
in France, 180;
at Colchester, 61 ;

Patriot on Rev. M. M. Clark Cultivation of sugar, 9, 24.
in Holland, 180;
at Ipswich, 61 ;

and American slavery.

Cussac's work on slavery in the
in Mississippi, 207;

at Norwich, 60;

Brougham, Lord, speeches of, against French Colonies, ll.
in New Hampshire, 79, 207 ;
at Saffron Walden, 61 ;

the sugar duties, 125, 149.
in North Carolina, 30.
at Woodbridge, 61.

protest of, against the sugar duties,
Abolitionist arrested, 15, 80 ; Anti-slavery Presbyterian Assembly,

151 ;

D.
imprisoned, 64.

158.

Buxton, Sir T. F., reference to, 14.
Absenteeism, evils of, 168.
Anti-slavery tour, 60.

Buxton, Sir E. N., speech of as chair- Danish Abolitionists, 200.
Acland, Sir T. D., M.P., speech of, Argument against immigration, 22. man of public meeting, 90. Death of Torrey, 89, 144.
on sugar duties, 130.
Aristocracy of skin, 152.

Death of the liberator, a poem, 74.
Addresses
Arno's Vale Estate, expenditure of,

Decision in the case of a fugitive
to the Evangelical Alliance on
21.

C.

slave, 204.
American slavery, 51;
Arrest of Abolitionist, 15, 80 ;

Demerara, Madeirans, in, 62, 207.
to the Free Church of Scotland, of negroes, 16.

Cambridge, meeting at, 61.

Deputation to Mr. Secretary Glad-
on American slavery, 98; Arrival of fugitives from Martinique, Cape of Good Hope, labour at, 78.

stone, 40.
to the French Anti-Slavery So- 15, 168, 208.

Capture of slavers, 64, 80, 112. Destruction of slave-vessels, 80.
ciety, on slavery in the French Ashburton, Lord, protest of, against Caroline, crew of, 14, 27.

Dexter, Benj. B., letter from, 202.
colonies, 53;

sugar duties, 152;
China, slavery in, 175.

D'Israeli, B., M.P., speech on the
to Lord John Russell, on immi. speech against the sugar duties, Christianity and slave-bolding, 10.

sugar duties, 131.
gration into the British colonies, 149.

Circassian war, 32, 47.

Dispensaries in Jamaica, 61.
123;

Asiatic missions and American sla- Clark, Rev. John, letter from (Ja- Disturbances at Bourbon, 79.
to the same, on the sugar duties, very,

138.
maica), 202.

Dominica, arrival of fugitive slaves
121.

Clark, Rev. M. M., letter from, at, 168 ;
Admission of coloured churches, 194.

B.
186.

exports and imports, 45, 62;
African immigrants, 208.

Clarkson, Thomas, death of, 153; general intelligence from, 15.
Agents for colonies, 16.
Bahamas, population of, 63.

biography of, 172;

Douglass, Frederick, extract of a
Alabama-
Baltimore, civilization in, 16.
leader on, 180;

letter from, 32;
Abolitionist imprisoned, 64 ; Barbadoes, crops in, 208;

biography of, continued, 189. speeches of, at public meetings,
Anti-slavery movement in, 63; disturbances in, 208 ;

Clay, Cassius M., seizure of the 93, 95.
Negro dogs, in, 63 ;
railway in, 15 ;

press of, 30;

Duncan, John, account of Mr., the
prohibition of slave-dealing in, 63 ; revenue of, 45.

speech of, at New York, 45.

American traveller, 16.
Alexander, G. W.--

Bazaar at Philadelphia, 58, 73, 132, Colchester, meeting at, 61.
speeches of, at public meetings, 143, 162,

Colonial agents, 16.
90, 96;
Beet root sugar, 16.
Colonial functionaries, 143.

E.
letter from, on the subject of free Belfast, meeting at, 77.

Colonial Gazette, 199.
labour, 186.

Bentinck, Lord George, speech of, Colonial intelligence, 14, 29, 44, 61, Ecclesiastical bodies in America,
American ambassadors, 78.

against sugar duties, 128.

74, 77, 88, 11, 168, 188, 207. their action, 156.
American Anti-slavery Society, 105, Berbice, Coolies in, 207 ;

Colonial produce, trade in, 44. Education in Virginia, 14.
191.
emigration to, 78 ;

Colonization and the slave-trade, 30. Egypt, slavery in, 48.
American cotton, market for, 32, 56. leasing estate in, 207.

Coloured churches, admission of, 194. Ellenborough, Lord, protest of,
American delegates to the Evange- Bexley, Lord, protest of, against the Constantinople, slave-market at, 69. against the sugar duties, 151.
lical Alliance, 185.

sugar duties, 151.
Consumption of sugar, 16.

Emancipadoes in Jamaica, 29.
American ecclesiastical bodies, their Bey of Tunis, 200.

Conviction of slave-dealers, 80. Emancipation of eight slaves in New
action, 156.

Bible argument against slavery, 7, Coolie immigration, 199; its im- Orleans, 152.
American negroes, 78.
38, 54, 70, 140, 158, 176, 196. moral tendency, 37.

Emancipation in Texas, 80.
American politicians, their move- Biography-

Coolies—

Emigration of Coolies -
ments, 42.
Clarkson, Thomas, 172, 189; in Berbice, 207 ;

to Berbice, 78 ;
American slavery, addresses on, to Knibb, Rev. W., 26;

in British Guiana, 45, 62;

to Mauritius, 5.
the Evangelical Alliance, 51; Torrey, Rev. C. T., 106.

in Jamaica, 29, 44, 62, 77 ; Escape of slaves from the French
to Free Church of Scotland, 98 ; Birmingham, meeting at, 125.

in Mauritius, 5;

colonies, 20, 112, 168, 208.
defeating Asiatic missions, 138; Blood-hounds, 76.

in Trinidad, 58, 62, 78, 137, 160, Evangelical Alliance-
and Evangelical Alliance, 146; Blyth, Rev. G., letter from (Ja. 163, 192.

addresses to, on American slavery,
and Free Church of Scotland, 108; maica), 202.

Cotton, cultivation of

51, 191;
illustrated, 155, 194 ;
Bourbon, disturbances at, 79.

in India, 9, 196;

American delegates to, 185 ;
meetings on, in America, 200; Brazilian government and the slave- in Jamaica. 61, 77 ;

and American slavery, 146 ;
in Finsbury Chapel, 95 ;

trade treaty, 12.
in Port Natal, 9;

leading articles on, 58, 73, 142,
overtures on, 187.
Brazilians charged with piracy, 28. in Pennsylvania, 46.

161, 179, 180, 198;
Americans in the Dominican service, British emancipated colonies, report Cotton, manufacture of articles from letters from, 53, 192 ;
47.

free-grown, 4, 23.

proceedings of, 145, 165, 183,201.
Andexation of Texas, 25, 29, 30, 77. British exports, 16.

Creole, the, negroes of, 16.

Evils of absenteeism in Jamaica, 168.
Annual meeting of the British and British Guiana, Coolies in, 45, 62 ; Crew of the Caroline, 14, 27. Expenditure of Arno's Vale Estate,
Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, crops in, 78;

Crops-

21.
72, 90.
flogging ordinance, 45, 62 ;

in Barbadoes, 208;

Expedition to the Niger, 77.
Anti-slavery bazaar, 58, 73, 132, legislation in, 36, 73;

in British Guiana, 78;

Exports from Jamaica, 29.
143, 162.
Madeirans in, 62, 78 ;

in Jamaica, 44,

Extracts from La Réforme, 25.

on, 134.

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HOUSE

15 DEC 1932

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122 ;

34 ;

97;

120 ;

191;

Leading articles on-

Manufacture of articles from free-
F.

J.
Polish insurrection, 58, 72;

grown produce, 4, 9, 23;
prize poems, 25, 43 ;

of sugar in Jamaica, 78,
Famine in Russia, 16.
Jamaica-

protest against the sugar duties, Marriage among slaves, 53.
Fanchon, story of, 70.
arrival of Emancipados in, 29 ;

Martinique-
Félice, Professor de, letter from, 76 ; Coolies in, 29, 44, 61, 77 ;

Queen's speech, 26 ;

Escape of slaves from, 15;
work of, on emancipation, 106. crops in, 44 ;

Reformed Presbyterians, 198; jealousy of anti-slavery publica-
Fires in Trinidad, 62.

cultivation of cotton in, 61, 77 ; Report of the British and Foreign tions in, 30.
Flight of the slave, a poem, 200. dispensaries in, 61;

Anti-slavery Society, 88; Maryland --
Flogging ordinance in British Guiana, evils of absenteeism in, 168;

Richardson, James, 89, 180; Meeting of slave-holders in, 63 ;
45.
exports from, 29;

Secretary of State for the Co- Dr. Snodgrass, threatened pro-
Florida, dreadful case of Lynching in, House of Assembly of, 29 ;

lonies, 9;

secution of, 46.
46.
immigration into, 24, 77 ;

slavery in the Danish colonies, Mauritius, emigration of Coolies to,
Foreign intelligence, 15, 25, 49, 63, import duties, 188;

200;

5.
78, 88, 143, 206.
liberated Africans in, 45 ;

in the French colonies, 9.

Meeting at Finsbury Chapel, 95.
France, right of search, 31, 48. management of estates in, 188; slavery and the slave-trade in Meeting of slave-holders in Mary-
Freedom and slavery contrasted, 14, manufacture of sugar in, 78;

Muscat, 9.

land, 63.
69.
railways in, 14;

slave-trade papers, 26 ;

Memorials-
Freedom bequeathed to slaves in rate of wages in, 188;

slave-trade returns, 143 ;

to Right Hon. W. E. Gladstone,
New Orleans, 15.
savings banks in, 29;

Dr. Smyth's retraction of charges M.P. on West India legislation,
Free-grown cotton, manufacture of
scarcity of work in, 29;

brought by him against Frederick
articles from, 4, 23, 43, 57. sugar manufactory in, 29;

Douglass, 143;

to the same, on the immoral tend.
Free-labour produce, letters on, 186. unwillingness to work in, 168. Sugar duties, 41, 58, 88, 104, 122, ency of Coolie immigration, 37 ;
Free Church of Scotland -
James, Rev. John Angell, opinion

142;

to the same,

on legislation in
address to, on American slavery, of slavery, 186.

suppression of the slave-trade, 178; British Guiana, 67 ,
Joy of liberty, 15.

Torrey, Rev. C. T., 73, 89; to Lord Stanley, on legislation in
and American slavery, 108;

West Indies, general intelligence Trinidad, 35.
and slave-holders' money, 77 ;

from, 180;

to the same,

on legislation in
K.
leading article on, 105.

Legislation in British Guiana -

British Guiana, 36.
French Anti-slavery Society-

Memorial to Right Hon. W. E. to Lord John Russell, on the

sup-
address to, on slavery in the French Kentucky gag law, 63 ;

Gladstone, M.P., on, 67 ;

pression of the slave-trade, 169;
colonies, 53 ;
legislation in, 46.

extract from a memorial to Lord Mendi mission, 22.
letter from, 54 ;
Keppel, George, reply to memorial Stanley, on, 36.

Methodist Church in the United
petition of, to the Chamber of on the part of Lord John in Trinidad, extracts from a me- States, its position, 194.
Deputies, 103.
Russell, 172.

morial to Lord Stanley, on, 35.

Mines in Cuba, 47.
French Colouies-

Ketley, Rev. Jos., accident to, 62. Legislation in Kentucky, 46 ; M.Lean, Captain, narrative of the
slavery in, 9, 11, 20, 53, 70, 108, Kidnapping, 206.

Letters from

Susan King, 68, 208.
King, Rev. A., letter of, 184.

Alexander, G. W., 5, 186 ; Missionary Conventions in the United
escape of slaves from, 20, 112, Knibb, Rev. W., biography of, 26. American Anti-slavery Society, States, 30.
168, 208.
Kubrairiewich's work on Austrian

Missouri, free basis of, 63.
French ordinance, 18.

Poland, 74.
Blyth, Rev. G., 202;

Missouri, the slave shackles found in
Fugitive, rescue of a re-captured, 15.

Brock, Rev. W., 166 ;

the, 32.
Fugitives in New Hampshire, 207.

L.
Clark, Rev. John, 202;

Murder of negroes, 80, 108.
Fugitive slave, life of a, 70.

Clark, Rev. M. M., 186;

Muscat, slavery and the slave-trade
Labour at the Cape of Good Hope,
Dexter, B. B., 202;

in, 3.
Eaton, Joseph, 5;'
78.
Evangelical Alliance, 53, 192 ;

N.
G.
Leading articles on-

Félice, Professor, 76;
abolition of slavery in Tunis, 40;

French Anti-slavery Society, 54 ;

Negro dogs in Alabama, 63.
Gag law in Kentucky, 63 ;

American Anti-slavery Societies,

Gurney, J. J., 5;

Negroes in America. 78.
in Congress, 64.

105;
Keppel, George, 172;

Negroes murdered, 80, 108.
Gladstone, Right Hon. W. E., M.P., American cotton, 56 ;

l'helps, Rev. A. A., 29, 75;

Negroes of the Creole, 16.
memorial to, on the immoral American politicians, their move.

Reade, Sir T., 39;

New Niger expedition, 77.
tendency of Coolie immigration, ments, 42;

Norwich, meeting at, 69.
American slavery, 200 ;

Rhoads, Samuel, 46, 76 ;
on legislation in British Guiana, annexation of Texas, 25 ;

Richardson, James, 111, 133, 154, No slavery in Oregon, 207.

181, 195 ;
annual meeting of the British and
on West India legislation, 34.

Foreign Anti-slavery Society,
Sturge, Joseph, 5, 124 ;

0.
Governor of Antigua, presentation

72;

Tappan, Lewis, 46, 201;

Thomas, George, 5;
of, 10.
anti-slavery bazaar, 58, 73, 143 ;

O'Donnell, General, 66, 79.
Graham, Rev. W., U.S., suspension anti-slavery cause, 8;

Whittier, J. G., 75, 164.

Ordinances, French, 18.

Liberated Africans-
of, for advocating slavery, 15. anti-slavery sentiment in France

in Jamaica, 45 ;

Oregon, no slavery in, 207.
Gurney, J. J., 5.

and Holland, 180;
in Trinidad, 45.

Original Correspondence, 75, 111,
Anti-slavery League, 162, 180;

201.
ANTI-SLAVERY REPORTER, 8;
Liberation of slaves, 80.

Overture on American slavery, 187.
H.
Bey of Tunis, 200 ;

Liberty Bazaar, at Philadelphia, 58,
Brazilian slave-trade, 10;
73, 132, 143, 162.

P.
Hayti, news from, 47, 64.

British Guiana legislation, 73;

Liberty of British subjects invaded,

68.
Heathenism in the United States, 15.
Brock, Rev. W., 161;

Parliamentary intelligence-

203,
Home intelligence, 14, 28, 60, 77, Christianity and slave-holding, 10 Liberty party in America, 158,

House of Lords-

206.
187.
Colonial functionaries, 143;
Licentiousness of slavery, 80.

sugar duties, 125, 147;
Horrors of the slave-trade, 119.
Colonial Gazette, 199;

House of Commons-

Literary notices-
Human affection trafficked in, 70.

Colonial Intelligence, 74, 88 ;
Coolie immigration, 199 ;

sugar duties, 127, 128.
Emancipation, immediate et com-
Coolies in Trinidad. 160 ;

Peel, Sir Robert, M.P., on the sugar
plete, des Esclaves.-Appel aux
Abolitionistes. Par G. de Félice, Pennington, Rev. J. W. C., the

duties, 130.
crowning crime of Christendom,
I.

106;
58;
Cuban mines, 26;

coloured preacher, 61.

Essai sur le Gouvernement paternel
Illustrations of slavery, 102, 118, cultivation of cotton at Port

de l'Autriche. Par Michel Ku- | Pennsylvania, cultivation of cotton in,
155, 187, 194.
Natal, 9;

brairewich, 74 ;

Petitions-
Immigration-

cultivation of sugar, 24 ;
Situation des Esclaves dans les

against immigration into the British

Colonies Françaises,-Urgence
argument against, 22;
cultivation of sugar and cotton in

colonies, 124;
address to Lord John Russell, on, India, 9;

de leur Emancipation. Par M.

of the French Anti-slavery Society,
death of Torrey, 89;

J. B. Rouvellat de Cussac, 11.

for the aboliltion of slavery in
into the British West Indies, 29, deputation to Mr. Secretary Glad. Loss of the Lucy Walker, 162.

Louisiana -

the French Colonies, 103.
57, 77, 88, 136;

stone, 40;
revolt of slaves in, 63;

Phelps, Rev. A. A., extract of
into Jamaica, 24, 77;
Evangelical Alliance, 58, 73, 142,

letters from, 29, 75.

slave beaten to death in, 64 ;
petition against, 124.

161, 179, 180, 198;
Importation of sugar, 42.

Philadelphia Liberty Bazaar, 58, 73,
extracts from La Reforme, 25 ;
sugar crop in, 15, 64;

132, 143, 162.
Imports into Dominica, 62;

Free Church of Scotland, 105;

sugar estates in, 31;
into Jamaica, 188.

Piracy, Brazilians charged with, 28.
free-labour cotton, 43, 57;
Lynching in Florida, 46.

Poetry-
Imprisonment of Abolitionists, 15, foreign intelligence, 88, 143;

The crowning crime of Christen-
64.
Governor of Antigua, 10;

dom, 58;
Incompetency of an armed force, for immigration into Jamaica, 24 ;

M.

37 ;

67 ;

46.

• 123.

Death the liberator, 74:
the suppression of the slave- immigration into the British co-

The flight of the slave, 200;
trade, 162.

lonies, 57, 88, 123 ;
Madeirans-

Loss of the Lucy Walker, 162;
India-

importation of sugar, 42 ;
in British Guiana, 62, 78 ;

Ode on the death of Thomas
cultivation of cotton in, 196; incompetency of an armed force, in St. Vincent, 62, 168;

Clarkson, 180;
slavery in, 193.

162 ;
in Trinidad, 207.

Ode on the death of Rev. C. T.
Inglis, Sir R. H., M.P., on the Irish Presbyterians, 143;

Mahommedan and Turkish slavery, Torrey, 144 ;
sugar duties, 129.
legislation in the West Indies, 25, 195.

The slave-ship, 43;
Insurrection in Poland, 64, 79.

Malay slave-trade, 20.

The slave-trade, 12, 17;
Ipswich, meeting at, 61.

manufacture of articles from free- Management of estates in Jamaica, Texas ! the voice of New England,
Irish Presbyterians, 144.

grown cotton, 9;
188.

12, 17.

40;

123;

30;

i

208;

68 ;

53;

Polish insurrection, 58, 64, 72, 79. Russell, the Right Hon. Lord John, Stanley, Lord, memorials to, on legis- United States -
Population,

M.P., addresses to, on immi. lation in British Guiana, 36 ; annexation of Texas, 29, 30, 77;
of Bahamas, 62;
gration to the British colonies, on the same in Trinidad, 35.

Baltimore civilization, 15 ;
of British Guiana, 78.

St. Lucia, arrival of fugitives from colonization and the slave-trade,
Portugal
on the sugar duties, 121;

Martinique in, 45, 168, 208 ;
progress of the anti-slavery cause memorial to, on the suppression of exports from, 29.

cultivation of cotton in Pennsyl-
in, 31, 47, 63;

the slave-trade, 169;

Sturge, Joseph, speeches of, at public vania, 46 ;
slave laws in, 63.
speech of, on the sugar duties, 127. meetings, 92, 95 ;

decision in the case of a fugitive
Prize Poems on Beard's Picture, 17, Russians and Circassians, 32.

letter from, in reply to Mr. Porter, slave, 204 ;
25, 43.

124.

freedom bequeathed to slaves, 15
Proceedings of the Evangelical Alli-

St. Vincent, African immigrants to, fugitives in New Hampshire, 207 ;
ance, 145, 165, 183, 201 ;

government officers, 78;
of the Anti-slavery League, 166.

S.
immigration into, 15, 62:

gag law in Kentucky, 63 ;
Profits of sugar cultivation in the

Madeirans in, 62, 168.

heathenism at home, 15;
West Indies. 21.

Sugar-

joy of liberty, 15;
Profits of the slave-trade, 32.
Saffron Walden, meeting at, 61.

Crop in Louisiana,
64 ;

kidnapping, 206 ;
Progress of abolition principles in Sale of slaves in America, 152.

cultivation in the West Indies, its legislation in Kentucky, 46 ;
the United States, 15.
Sandon, Lord, speech of on the sugar

profits, 21 ;

liberty of British subjects invaded,
Prohibition of slave-trading in Ala-

duties, 129.

from beet root, 16;
bama, 63.
Scarcity of food in Surinam, 47.

general consumption of, 16;

liberty party, 206 ;
Prospects of slave-trading in the Scarcity of work in Jamaica, 29.

manufactory in Jamaica, 29.

Louisiana sugar, 15 ;
United States, 15.
Slave-
Sugar duties -

Lynching in Florida, 46 ;
Protests against the sugar duties--

beaten to death in Louisiana, 64 ; address to Lord J. Russell on, 121; meeting of slave-holders in Mary-
of Lord Ashburton, 152;
dealers convicted, 45, 80;

answer of Joseph Sturge to Mr. land, 63;
of Lord Bexley. 151;
dealing in Alabama, 63;

Porter's letter, on the, 124; missionary conventions, 30;
of the British and Foreign Anti-
markets, 69, 138;
debates on, 125, 146;

negro dogs in Alabama, 63;
slavery Society, 113, 122;
shackles, 32.

leading articles on, 41, 58, 88, negroes arrested, 16 ;
of Lord Brougham, 151 ;
Slave-holders-

104, 122, 142;

no slavery in Oregon, 207 ;
of Lord Ellenborough, 151;
Christian fellowship with, 51, 52,
paragraphs on, 77, 100 ;

petitions for freedom, 206 ;
of Lord Stanhope, 151.

protests against, 113, 151, 152. position of the Methodist Church,
Purchase of land for manumitted

and the Free Church, 77;
Suppression of the slave-trade ; me.

194 ;
slaves, 47.
meeting of, in Maryland, 63 ;

morial on, 169.

progress of abolition principles, 15;
trading connection with, 49, 50.

Surinam, Dutch commission for the prohibition of slave-trading in Ala-
Slave-trade-

purpose of inquiring into the bama, 63;
R.
in Angola, 31;

state of slavery in, 30 ;

prospects of trade, 16;
on coast of Africa, 64, 139, 152;
and colonization, 30;
scarcity of food in, 47.

purchase of land for manumitted

slaves, 47 ;
Railways-
in Cuba, 31;

rank of a slave, 15;
in Barbadoes, 15;
of the Great Desert, report on,

T.

revolt of slaves in Louisiana, 63;
in Jamaica, 15.
133, 154, 180;

right of petition, 30;
Randolph's slaves, 46, 205.

Tappan, Lewis, letters from, 46, 201. runaway slaves, 207 ;
Rank of a slave, 15.

poem on, 17;

Taxation of British Guiana, 78. slavery in Mississippi, 207 ;
Reade, Sir T., letter from on the profits of, 32;

Testimony to the advantages derived in Texas, 47 ;
abolition of slavery in Tunis, report on, 16, 48, 64, 114 ;

from emancipation, 29.

proceedings against Dr. Snodgrass,
39.
returns, 143;

Texas-
Reasons for withdrawing from our Spanish, 65;

annexation of, 29, 30, 77;

southern ministers, 207 ;
trading connection with slave.
suppression of, 169;
emancipation in, 80 ;

speaker of the House of Repre-
holders. Plan suggested for so treaty and Brazilian Government, legislature of, 79;

sentatives, 30;
doing, 49.

12.
news from, 79;

war against the press, 30 ;
Reed, Rev. A., withdrawal of from Slavers captured, 31, 80, 112.

slavery in, 47.
the Evangelical Alliance, 184.
Slavery-

Torrey, Rev. C. T., fate of, 22;
Reformed Presbyterians, 198.

in British India, 193;

apprehended death of, 69;
Report of the British and Foreign in China, 175;

leader on, 73;
Anti-slavery Society, 81, 88. in the Danish colonies, 200;

sympathy for, 89 ;

Virginia
Report of Mr. Jas. Richardson on in Egypt, 48 ;

biography of, 106.

Convention question, 63 ;
the slave-trade of the Great in the French colonies, 9, 11, 20, Trade in colonial and tropical pro- education in, 14 ;
Desert, 133, 154, 180.
53, 70, 108, 120 ;

duce, 44.

House of Assembly, 63 ;
Rescue of a re-captured fugitive, 15. in Mississippi, 207 ;

Traffic in human affection, 70.

Randolph's slaves, 46, 205 ;
Resolutions of the Committee of the in Muscat, 3, 9;

Trinidad-

slave market in, 138.
Society on the death of the Rev. in the Portuguese colonies, 63; Coolies in, 62, 78, 137, 163, 192;
C. T. Torrey, 107.
in Texas, 47.

fires in, 62;
on the death of Thomas Clarkson, illustrated, 102, 118, 155, 187, legislature of, 35;

W.
191 ;

194 ;

liberated Africans in, 47;
Retrospect of the Anti-slavery cause, contrasted with freedom, 14, 59; Madeirans in, 207;

War in Circassia, 47;
1.
licentiousness of, 80.

popular representation of, 78. in Gallicia, 64, 79.
Revolt of slaves in Louisiana, 63. Slaves


Tunis, abolition of slavery in, 31, 38. Weld, Theodore D., notice of, 7.
Rhoads, Samuel, letters from, 46, 76. emancipated in New Orleans, 152; | Turkey, serfdom in, 79;

West Indies, general intelligence
Richardson, James, arrival of at in Virginia, 80 ;

slavery in, 205.

from, 33, 51, 180;
Tripoli, 89.
marriage among, 53.

profits of sugar cultivation in, 21.
letter from, 111;
Smyth, Dr., reference to, 143 ;

Whittier, John G., letter from, 164.
report of, on the slave-trade of the Snodgrass, Dr., threatened prosecu-

U.

papers, 26;

46;

V.

Wilson, Maria, case of, and her nine
Great Desert, 133, 154, 181; tion of, 46.

children, 206.
leading article referring to his Songs' of the female slaves, en route United States-

Withdrawal from our trading con-
labours in the Great Desert, over the Great Desert, 196. Abolitionists arrested, 15, 80;

nection with slave-holders and
Southern ministers, 207.

abolition principles in New Hamp- reasons for so doing, 49.
letter of, on Turkish slavery, 125. Spanish slave-trade, 65.

shire and North Carolina, 30, Woodbridge, meeting at, 61.
Right of petition, 30.
Stanhope, Lord, protest of, against 79, 207;

Worthington, Nicholas, emancipation
Right of search, 31, 48.

the sugar duties, 15).
American ambassadors, 78;

of 100 slaves by his will, 30.

180 ;

1

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RETROSPECT OF THE ANTI-SLAVERY CAUSE.

circumstances as honourable to the emancipated slaves, as it was

satisfactory to every true philanthropist. No crime stained the It is impossible to recur to the history of the anti-slavery cause, advent of freedom. No man was injured in his person or property. during the last few years, without being deeply grateful for the In his gratitude for the benefit he enjoyed, the liberated negro important triumphs which, under the divine blessing, it has forgot the injuries he had received, and was prepared to return achieved.

good for evil. Seven years have now passed away since the enIn the early part of the year 1831, it is probable that not a single slaved population of these dependencies of the Crown were made free; leading abolitionist anticipated the overthrow of slavery in the and whether we estimate the blessings of liberty by the amount of colonial or territorial possessions of this country, during the life- physical happiness it has bestowed, or measure it by the moral time of the existing generation of slaves; and that they would have advantages it has conferred on one of the most degraded portions hailed with satisfaction a measure which secured to the children of of mankind, we must admit that it has more than realized the most such slaves the blessings of freedom on their attaining the age of sanguine expectations of its friends. Formerly, the slave populatwenty-one years. At that time, the colonists, confiding in their tion melted away under a system of toil, privation, and punishstrength and political importance, were in full opposition to the ment, too dreadful to be endured; now they increase rapidly in British legislature and the government, in relation to the regulations numbers, in property, and in influence; formerly, they were for the mitigation of the system of slavery, which had been voted by denied the blessings of education and religion ; now they enjoy the legislature, and had received the sanction of the King, as far both, and their improvement in character is as remarkable as their back as 1823; and then, too, the government were indisposed to increase in number. punish their contumacy, or to secure, by an appeal to the Imperial This great work having been so happily achieved, the abolitionParliament, what they had failed to obtain by concession and ists directed their attention to the evil of slavery, as it had conciliation. Nor were the abolitionists themselves either bold developed itself in other parts of the British empire. Year after or pressing in their demands; they asked simply for the ameliora- year they brought the subject under the attention of government tion of the condition of the slave population, and the gradual and of Parliament, and were gratified by the intelligence that, on extinction of slavery. But in that memorable year, one portion of the 5th of January, 1842, the Supreme Council of India had promulthe body advanced the great doctrine of immediate and entire gated a law, that “in no part of the Straits' settlements, (including abolition, and with a decision which nothing could alter, a courage Malacca, Singapore, Penang, and Province Wellesley,) shall the which faced all difficulties, and a zeal which knew no intermission, status of slavery be recognized as existing by law.” And "all they sent forth their agents through the length and breadth of the courts and officers of law” were “ prohibited from enforcing any land; and in a period of time which scarcely sufficed for a claims founded on any supposed right of masters, in regard to thorough organization, they carried the question with the public. slaves within the settlements aforesaid,” and were “enjoined to It was universally felt, that “SLAVERY WAS A Crime BEFORE afford protection to all persons against whom any supposed rights God,” which admitted of no delay in its extinction ; and that of slavery were attempted to be enforced.” By this act, many freedom should be given to the slave, without stint or restriction. thousands of slaves were liberated, and an atrocious slave-trade, Having thus convinced the public mind, and secured the public chiefly carried on by Chinamen or Malay pirates, for the most conscience, there was but little difficulty in moving the con- iniquitous purposes, was suppressed. stituencies throughout the kingdom, to exact from their representa- The British Government having had the defective state of the tives the advocacy of sound opinions in the House of Commons. law for the suppression of the slave-trade, so far as it related to The result was, the return of a large body of members to Parliament British India, pointed out, they submitted a measure to Parliament pledged to sustain the abolition cause. Events, in the meanwhile, to cure the same. This remedial act having passed the legislature, had transpired in the colonies, of such a character as to arrest the received the sanction of the Crown on the 10th of August 1842. attention of the government, and to compel them to action. In May, It provides, that “all the powers vested in the governors, lieu1833, Mr., now Lord Stanley, submitted to the House of Commons tenant-governors, and other persons exercising the authority of his celebrated scheme of abolition, which, after undergoing a governors in Her Majesty's colonies and plantations, and in Her lengthened discussion, and various important modifications, went Majesty's officers there, civil and military, for the more effectual into effect on the 1st of August, 1834. It admitted the justice and suppression of the importation of slaves into such colonies and expediency of abolition, but placed the whole of the slave popula- plantations, by sea, and for the punishment of all persons guilty of rion, above six years of age, under a system of coercion for a the crime of introducing, or attempting to introduce, slaves to any period of six years. It created an intermediate state of bondage, such colonies or plantations,” shall be “extended to, and vested in falsely called “apprenticeship,” which allowed the existence of the the respective governors, civil and military, of the several presidenworst features of the system of slavery, without the corresponding cies or places within the territories under the government of the advantages of the promised state of freedom. It soon became East India Company.” It was notorious, that slaves were every obvious to those who watched the progress of the measure, that year introduced into British India from Africa; and that, owing to " apprenticeship’ was but another name for slavery; and the facts the different opinions entertained by the law officers of the comhaving been laid before the public, and forced on the attention pany, of the existing Acts of Parliament against the slave-trade, no of Parliament, with the accustomed ability and energy of the proper cognizance was, or could be, taken of those criminal acts. leaders of the anti-slavery cause, that fruitful source of irrita- But this law has removed all difficulties on that head ; and we may tion, cruelty and oppression, was altogether removed.

hope it will be found sufficient to secure the object at which The memorable 1st of August, 1838, witnessed the complete it aims. triumph of abolition principles, throughout the British West Indies, The principle of abolition having been once recognized by the goSouth America, Southern Africa, and the Indian Ocean, under vernment, it became easy to apply it. We find, therefore, the Go

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