Four Poems from "Zion's Flowers;": Or, "Christian Poems for Spiritual Edification."

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George Richardson, 1855 - 212 páginas

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Página 50 - And these things, brethren, I have in a figure transferred to myself and to Apollos for your sakes; that ye might learn in us not to think of men above that which is written, that no one of you be puffed up for one against another.
Página 46 - One shall say, I am the Lord's; And another shall call himself by the name of Jacob; And another shall subscribe with his hand unto the Lord, And surname himself by the name of Israel.
Página 45 - Cast away from you all your transgressions, whereby ye have transgressed; and make you a new heart and a new spirit: for why will ye die, O house of Israel? For I have no pleasure in the death of him that dieth, saith the Lord God: wherefore turn yourselves, and live ye.
Página 48 - Thus I was as a man that heareth not, and in whose mouth are no reproofs.
Página 156 - O my soul, come not thou into their secret; unto their assembly, mine honour, be not thou united! For in their anger they slew a man, and in their self-will they digged down a wall. Cursed be their anger, for it was fierce, and their wrath, for it was cruel. I will divide them in Jacob and scatter them in Israel.
Página 6 - And further, by these, my son, be admonished : of making many books there is no end ; and much study is a weariness of the flesh.
Página ii - And no man putteth new wine into old bottles; else the new wine will burst the bottles and be spilled, and the bottles shall perish.
Página 42 - He that hath wife and children, hath given hostages to fortune ; for they are impediments to great enterprises, either of virtue or mischief. Certainly the best works and of greatest merit for the public, have proceeded from the unmarried or childless men : which both i1v affection and means have married and endowed the public.
Página xv - Trenchmore, and the Cushion-Dance, and then all the Company dance, Lord and Groom, Lady and Kitchen-Maid, no distinction. So in our Court, in Queen Elizabeth's time, Gravity and State were kept up. In King James's time things were pretty well. But in King Charles's time, there has been nothing but Trenchmore, and the Cushion-Dance, omnium gatherum, tolly-polly, hoite cum toite.
Página xxxix - lecture, and " a " Mr. James Durham preach, — graciously, and weel to the times as could have been desired." So that you see we are not of the loose-laced species, we! " And generally all who preached that day in the Town gave a fair enough testimony against the Sectaries.

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