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six slaveholding jurors. No slave can leave the plantation without a written permission; and any person giving permission without authority shall be fined fifty dollars. Any person who shall mutilate a slave and render him incapable of work, shall be fined fifty dollars, and pay the master two dollars per day for every day lost; and if the slave be forever made unable to work, then the offender shall pay his value, or suffer one year's imprisonment. Any person, having been a slave, returning to this State without permission, shall be forced back to slavery. Any free person of color who may be ordered to leave the State and does not, may be imprisoned at hard labor for five years. Free persons of color are not allowed to land in the State without a legal permit. A master of a vessel must give a bond for the non-landing of free persons of color on board his vessel. "This is the law of the chivalrous apostles of treason and rebellion; the rope, the stocks, the clog, the ballchain, the gag, the vice, the "nigger dogs," are the humanizing aids for their enforcement, and conspicuously portray the religion, humanity and civilization of the slaveocracy of the barren and ruined land under their horrid and diabolical sway. Thank God, the Moses of this people has come, and is now bravely leading the sons of Africa from the land of bondage to the glorious heritage of freedom and human rights. Yes, the crisis which involves the question whether this accursed viper shall be suffered longer to gnaw at our national vitals, to destroy and overthrow our constitutional liberty and laws, or whether the cause of the stupendous affliction now upon this promised land of liberty shall be a^uh hilated.

"There can be but one voice from the just, the good and the humane, and that voice is—perish slavery, perish its upholders, perish every power and obstacle to the disenthralment and liberty of the oppressed, whatever be his complexion or his condition. Hope beameth bright for the triumphant realization of freedom's jubilee. The battles fought, the proclamations from that best and greatest man, Abraham Lincoln—the man of liberty, of humanity, the people's man—the territory conquered, brothers reclaimed, those freed, show a future brighter and more glorious than the most generous ever conceived a hope for. How much more tenaciously should we cling to our dear country, now that she has .been imperiled and made to weep tears of blood because of the unnumbered dead, the waste and desolation of her once fruitful fields and happy and contented culturers. Our forefathers were the instruments that have marked and explored the destiny of this land. The disciples of Calhoun have striven, and are still striving to pervert and destroy their lofty aspirations, and these oligarchs find sympathizers in the cold and withering aristocracy of the North; but the people have spoken in their strength and declared that these cravenhearted and weak-kneed traitors shall not succeed, but with their braver friends, fighting for their treason, shall go down in ignominy together. When treason and rebellion shall be crushed, and the great people, including us, Louisianians, shall realize nature's just law, that slavery is no longer to blight and curse the civilization, morality and religion of the nation, when man will be acknowledged 'for a' that;' that color and difference in complexion may still be 'endowed with power to discover, with sense to love, and with imagination to expand towards their limitless perfection the attributes of Him whose finger the heavens are the handiwork," then the blessings of Liberty, life and the pursuit of happiness, equality and all the other great human rights of civil, political and religious self-government will follow, to make glad the philanthropic heart, and bring happiness, prosperity and fraternity to unborn millions, who will rise up to revere and treasure our sacred bequeathment. Then that flag, acknowledged by every people, the emblem of all that is good, great and glorious, will dance over the oblivious graves of the parricides who trailed it in the dust of Fort Sumter; and when the names of the Arnolds of this struggle will only be sounded with execration and contempt. Then

the people will feel and universally exclaim—

*******

"Who would sever Freedom's shrine?
Who would draw the inviduous line?
Though by birth one spot be mine,
Dear is all the rest.

Dear to me the South's fair land!
Dear the central mountain band!
Dear New England's rocky strand!
Dear the prairied West!

By our altars, pure and free!

By the laws deep-rooted tree!

By the Past's dread memory!

By our Washington!

By our common kindred tongue!
By our hopes, bright, buoyant, young,
By the tie of country strong!
We will still be one!

Father's, have ye bled in vain?
Ages, shall ye droop again?
Maker, shall Ave rashly stain
Blessings sent by Thee?

No! receive our solemn vow,
While before thy throne we bow,
Ever to maintain, as now,
c Union, Liberty !'"

Said Dr. Dostie, "I always cherished liberty, but I was led step by step, in the progressive movement of events, to perceive and acknowledge the truth that the Republic could no longer exist and withhold the sacred right of four millions of human beings. Events have proved the direct antagonism between Slavery and Republicanism, and that the one or the other must perish." Every event that unfolded the great plan of American freedom was embraced by him with enthusiastic joy. The arming of the negroes to fight against slavery and rebellion, was to him a source of rejoicing. The news of the fall of Port Hudson was received by the loyal people of New Orleans with great demonstrations of delight. The event was celebrated by thousands, both white and black, who assembled upon Canal Street around the statue of Henry Clay, to listen to addresses from the orators chosen for the occasion. Dr. Dostie being one of the speakers, addressed the audience as follows:

"On the 4th of July, 1*776, our noble sires fought a great moral battle, and achieved a victory, proclaiming to the world the great truth, that all men are created equal, and are from God entitled to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. Under the influence of these inestimable blessings this nation has grown, prospered and flourished to rank with the first in the world's history.

"In I860, traitors laid the corner-stone of slavery, and for more than two years struggled to erect a * Bastile' on the ruins of liberty. But the men of the West, who had sworn with their swords to cut their way to the Gulf, met the enemy of man and free institutions at Visksburg, the Gibraltar of their power, on the eightyseventh anniversary of Freedom's Day, and achieved a victory that has broken the back-bone of the monster rebellion. On the 8th of January, 1815, the iron-nerved Champion of Freedom—the immortal author of the words, 'the Union must and shall be preserved,' met the lion power of Great Britain on the plains of Chalmette, and drove the ruthless invader back, and taught him a lesson that he has never forgotten; showing to the world that freemen are mighty and cannot be bound by the power of despotism.

"Forty-eight years and six months thereafter the undaunted and heroic Banks fought a battle and won a victory vaster in its consequences than followed the brilliant achievement of the democratic Jackson. General Banks conquered the second stronghold of the rebellion, and now we are rejoicing that commerce will again flow uninterruptedly upon the bosom of the great Father of Waters, from its source to the Gulf. Let us, my fellowcitizens, devoutly thank the Great Disposer of all Good for these manifold blessings, and let us in all future prove ourselves freemen indeed, and firmly serve and uphold the flag of our fathers and make it what they designed, the emblem of liberty to all.

"Let us hold in hallowed remembrance the times that

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