Celtic [mythology]

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Marshall Jones Company, 1918 - 398 páginas
 

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Contenido

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Página 379 - OSSIAN. The Poems of Ossian in the Original Gaelic. With a Literal Translation into English, and a Dissertation on the Authenticity of the Poems.
Página 102 - Complete is my chair in Caer Sidi; Plague and age hurt not him who is in it, They know Manawyddan and Pryderi; Three organs round a fire sing before it, And about its points are ocean's streams. And the abundant well above it — Sweeter than white wine the drink of it.
Página 136 - The mythic trees of Elysium were not unknown on earth, though there they were safely guarded; and another instance, besides those already described,17 is found in the oak of Mugna. "Berries to berries the Strong Upholder [a god?] put upon it. Three fruits upon it, viz. acorn, apple, and nut; and when the first fruit fell, another used to grow." Leaves were always on this useful tree, which stood until Ninine the poet cast it down.18 What is perhaps a debased myth of a world-tree like Yggdrasil is...
Página 48 - Behold the sid before your eyes, It is manifest to you that it is a king's mansion Which was built by the firm Dagda; It was a wonder, a court, an admirable hill.
Página 368 - Torlough" by John, son of Rory MacGrath. 5 plates. (Roy. Irish acad. Trans, v. 32, sec. C., p. 133-198. Dublin, 1903.) Cattle-raid (The) of Cualnge. (Tain Bo Cuailnge.) An old-Irish prose-epic, translated for the first time from Leabhar na h-Uidhri and the Yellow Book of Lecan, by LW Faraday.
Página 209 - And everlasting abode of torture. It is a law of pride in this world To believe in the creatures, to forget God, Overthrow by diseases, and old age, Destruction of the soul through deception. A noble salvation will come From the King who has created us, A white law will come over seas; Besides being God, He will be man.
Página 19 - ... or borrowed these from the old myths, but they had little sense of proportion and were infected by a vicious rhetorical verbosity and exaggeration. Many tales revel monotonously in war and bloodshed, and the characters are spoiled by excessive boastfulness. Yet in this later stratum the mythopceic faculty is still at work, inasmuch as tales were written in which heroes were brought into relation with the old divinities. The main sources for the study of Irish mythology are the documents contained...
Página 31 - smith") had promised that though the battle lasted seven years, he would replace every broken sword or spear-head; no spear-head forged by him would miss, and none whom it pierced would continue in life. He kept his promise, making weapons by three turns in his forge, and renewed the blunted or broken instruments of war. Elsewhere we learn that Goibniu's immortal ale, like nectar and soma, made the divinities immortal,17 so that he is the equivalent of the Greek Hephaistos, god of craftsmen, who...
Página 168 - Diarmaid, and four others remained outside. Presently Midac left the palace, when all its splendour disappeared, and the Feinn were unable to move. Meanwhile an army arrived, but Diarmaid and the others repulsed it after long fighting; and he released Fionn and the rest with the blood of three kings.33 In a folk-tale version the blood was exhausted before Conan was reached, and he said to Diarmaid, "If I were a pretty woman, you would not have left me to the last," whereupon Diarmaid tore him away,...

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