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and that is as above suggested. This measure is not only in the interest of our empire, but it will undoubtedly tend to strengthen the existing ties of friendship, and to secure the advantages of commerce permanently. For this reason has his Majesty the Tycoon addressed a letter to his Majesty the President, with the object of postponing the opening of the two ports and the two cities as above mentioned.

We consulted the ministers of foreign powers on this subject, and also fully explained it to the Prussian minister, last arrived, who agreed to the reasons set forth, in consequence of which, in the treaty concluded with Prussia, the article referring to the two ports and the two cities was omitted.

It is our heartfelt desire that your excellency will take the foregoing in due consideration, and in view of the urgency of the case and the importance of our statement, be pleased to submit the matter to his Majesty the President, and cause it to be settled and accepted in conformity with our wishes, and for the perpetuation of the existing friendship between the two countries.

We also consulted his excellency Townsend Harris on the subject, who partly agrees with us. A communication by him will also be made to your excellency.

We further beg leave to inform you that similar communications have been sent to the governments of those powers having treaties with Japan.

Stated with respect and courtesy
: On the 23d day of the 3d month of the 1st year of Runkin.

KUDSI YAMATO NO KAMI.
ANDO TSCSIMA NO KAMI.

The Tycoon of Japan to the President of the United States :

Greeting: I have to state to your Majesty the President of the United States of America, that since a treaty was concluded between my empire and the United States, the relations between the two countries have been in steady progress of organization, and that the time approaches, when much of what is stipulated in that treaty is to go into effect. But there are several obstacles in the way of execution of that article of the treaty which relates to the opening of the ports of Hiogo and Neëgata, and the admittance of foreign trade in the cities of Yedo and Osacca. I therefore desire to postpone the opening of the places above named. More particular information on this subject will be communicated by the members, of my council for foreign affairs, Kudsi Yamato no Kami and Ando Tsusima no Kami, to the minister of foreign affairs of the United States.

I hope that your Majesty, animated by friendly feeling, will consent to this. I wish happiness and prosperity to the United States. On the 23d day of the 3d month of the 1st year of Runkin.

(Name of his Majesty the Tycoon.].

Mr. Harris to Secretary of State.

No. 21.]
LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES IN JAPAN,

Yedo, June 7, 1861. Sir: In my despatch No. 4, dated January 22, I had the honor to inform you of the steps taken by me to insure the arrest and punishment of the murderers of Mr. Heusken, the interpreter to this legation.

Since then I have frequently pressed the Japanese ministers to give me some evidence of the sincerity of their professions.

A large number of persons have been arrested on suspicion, but their com

plicity in the crime could not be brought home to them; some of them were convicted of other crimes, and have been executed. I am convinced that the Japanese are acting in good faith, and that they earnestly wish to discover and punish the assassins of Mr. Heusken.

I hand you herewith (No. 1) copy and translation of a letter froin the minister for foreign affairs, stating that the three Yakonines who attended Mr. Heusken on the night of his murder have been punished for neglect of duty, and also that four guards, who were on duty near the place where Mr. Heusken was assaulted, have also been punished for remissness on that melancholy occasion. I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

TOWNSEND HARRIS,

Minister Resident in Japan. Hon. SECRETARY OF STATE, Washington.

To his excellency Townsend Harris, minister and plenipotentiary of the United

States of America, &c., &c., fr.: We state to you in writing, in reference to the murder of Mr. Heusken, secretary at your legation, which took place last year, that stringent orders were issued to arrest the criminals, of which we informed you before.

As the escort, however, on that occasion did not act properly, punishment has been awarded to Sudzuki Dzennodzio and six other persons, as stated in accompanying writing.

It is desirable that the foregoing be brought to your notice.
Stated with respect and courtesy.
On the 26th day of the 4th month of the 1st year of Bunkin, (June 5, 1861.)

KUĎSI YAMATO NO KAMI.
ANDO TSUSIMA NO KAMI.

Translation of sentence. Sudzuki Dzennodzio, Kondou Nawosaburo, Adzime Konkichi, dismissed the service; they cannot be reinstated, and are not permitted to go out.

Sinkichi, Dzenske, Marorokee, Tatuemon, guards at the guard-house, dismissed the service as guards, and not permitted to serve again in that capacity. A true translation.

A. L. C. PORTMAN,

Interpreter.

Mr. Harris to Secretary of State.

No. 26.]
LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES IN JAPAN,

Yedo, July 2, 1861. Sir: In my despatch No. 26, dated August 1, 1860, I had the bonor to inform the department that I was of the opinion that it would be expedient to postpone the opening of this city for the residence of American citizens beyond the date fixed therefor by the treaty of Yedo, and I gave my reasons in ericRSO for that opinion.

During the eleven months that have elapsed since I addressed the department on this matter all my observation has tended to strengthen the views I have already expressed on the subject. The American merchants in Japan are generally of the opinion that no material advantage to their business will arise from the opening of this city to them as a place of residence.

I respectfully request your perusal of a copy of the despatch in question, which I transmit herewith, (No. 1.)

The time for some definite action is rapidly approaching, and I shall be extremely embarrassed if I do not receive your instructions in this behalf before that period actually arrives. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant;

TOWNSEND HARRIS,

Minister Resident. Honorable the SECRETARY OF STATE,

Washington.

Mr. Harris to Mr. Seward.

No. 29.]
LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES IN JAPAN,

Yedo, July 10, 1861. Sir: I have to pray you to be pleased to lay before the President my respectful request to be recalled as minister resident of the United States in Japan.

My first commission as the agent of the United States in this country dates back to August 4, 1855, and during the whole period I have been absent but once from my post of duty. This was under a sick certificate, and the whole time of absence was only fifty-one days.

The extraordinary life of isolation that I have been compelled to lead has greatly impaired my health, and this, joined to my advancing years, warns me that it is time for me to give up all public employment.

I could wish to be relieved early next January, as this would enable me to pass the Red Sea, on my return, in the month of March. I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

TOWNSEND HARRIS,

Minister Resident. Hon. William H. SEWARD,

Secretary of State, Washington.

Mr. Harris to Mr. Seward.

No. 30.]
LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES IN JAPAN,

Yedo, July 12, 1861. SIR: I have the honor to inform you that I had an interview with the ministers for foreign affairs yesterday, and on this occasion I repeated the substance of my letter to them dated the 8th instant (a copy of which forms enclosure No. 2 of my despatch No. 27) on the subject of the late attack on the British legation, and enlarged on the danger that would attend any vacillation on their part in securing the arrest and punishment of the authors of that criminal attempt on the life of all the persons composing the English legation.

The ministers then made the following statement: The number of men engaged in the attack was fourteen; of these three were killed on the spot, and one, who was wounded, was made prisoner. Three more were tracked the next morning to Sinagawa; of these two were found to have ripped themselves ap, and the third, who had also wounded himself, was seized. Both the prisoners were in safe custody, and were receiving medical treatment, previous to their being strictly examined. Lists of the names of the fourteen members of the band were found on the prisoners, and the ministers do not doubt that it correctly states the actual number of those engaged. The other seven had been traced further, and every effort was being made to arrest them; but that was a difficult matter; and, iu proof of their statement, they informed me that in the parallel case of the murder of the regent in March, 1860, although the assassins were well known, yet up to this time only one of them had been arrested although the government had every possible inducement to stimulate their efforts, and were also aided by the powerful clan of the murdered prince.

They stated that Mr. Alcock had, in March last, refused his consent to the posting of the guard, as was desired by the Japanese in command at the legation, and added that, had the guard been posted as was desired by then, i might not have prevented the attack, but they were confident the assailants would have been killed or beaten off before they had penetrated the house.

As to the motives of the attack, the ministers stated that there was a strony public feeling against all foreign trade and relations, mainly owing to the increased dearness of everything since the ports were opened, and also in part to a deeply rooted love for old customs and the traditional policy of exclusion. The ministers added that these men belonged to a band of desperate outlaws. willing to make themselves the exponents of the national feelings, and who gloried in sacrificing their lives in such a cause.

They attacked the British legation, hoping not only to distinguish themselves by slaying all the members of the mission, but also to bring about a war with the foreigners, and thereby secure a return to their old state of isolation.

The ministers stated that they believed the foregoing to be the sole motives that actuated the men, who were all of low degree, and were without any insti. gators or abettors among men of high rank or station.

They were well aware that these repeated attacks on foreigners and their inability to punish the offenders would cause foreign governments to look on them with distrust, and perhaps to doubt their sincerity. They hoped that k I had been so long in the country, and knew its condition better than any other! foreigner, I would give my testimony in support of the truth of their representations. ,

As to the security of the foreign representatives here, they could assure me that if they were permitted to use the same means for the protection of the diplomatic representatives as they used for their own security, we might satels rely on having the same amount of protection that they enjoyed themselves.

The ministers desired to repeat the assurance that they were 'using every means in their power to arrest, not only the persons engaged in the last attack, but also of all who had assailed foreign residents.

I transmit herewith (No. 1) copy of a letter dated the 11th instant, addressed i by me to the British minister, Mr. Alcock. I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

TOWNSEND HARRIS,

Minister Resident. Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD,

Secretary of State, Washington.

No. 75.]
Legation OF THE UNITED STATES IN JAPAN,

Yedo, July 11, 1861. Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter, dated the 8th instant, in acknowledgment of my letter to you of the same date.

You thank me for the expression of my views upon the present conjuncture, in which, you are glad to say, there is a general accordance with your own, and you add that “ if there be any.divergence, it is in the absence of all hope on my part that the Japanese government will behave otherwise on this than on every former occasion of the like nature.”

I endeavored to avoid expressing any opinion whatever as to the future action of the Japanese government, and if you will take the trouble to reperuse my letter, I think that you will see that you have somewhat misconstrued the expressions used by me.

I had a long interview with the minister for foreign affairs to-day, and the principal subject of consideration was the recent outrage on your legation.

I do not enter into any particulars of the discussion, as I deem it best to leave the ministers themselves to be their own interpreters in this matter. I have the honor to be, sir, your most obedient, humble servant,

TOWNSEND HARRIS,

Minister Resident of the United States in Japan. RUTHERFORD ALCOCK, Esq., C. B.,

H. B. M.'s Minister Plenipo'y and Envoy Extra'y in Japan.

Mr. Harris to Mr. Seward.
No. 31.)
LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES IN Japan,

Yedo, July 15, 1861. Sir: I have the honor to transmit herewith (No. 1) copy of a letter from J.K. De Witt, esq., Netherlands consul general in Japan, informing me of his decision not to return to this capital until further instructed by his government.

I also transmit (No. 2) copy of my reply to the foregoing.
I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your most obedient servant, .

TOWNSEND HARRIS,

Minister Resident. Hon. Wm. H. SEWARD,

Secretary of State, Washington.

No. 224.] CONSULATE GENERAL OF THE NetherLANDS IN JAPAN,

Yokohama, July 10, 1861. Sir: After the attack on the British legation on the night of the 5th instant, I have the honor to acquaint you that I have decided not to return to Yedo until I shall have received further instructions from my government on this subject.

At the same time, I have the honor to send you a copy of the letter whereby I have communicated to the Japanese ministers this my decision, to which I am led by the same motives which moved me to leave Yedo temporarily in the beginning of this year. I have the honor to be, sir, your most obedient, humble servant,

J. K. DE WITT. TOWNSEND HARRIS, Esq.,

Minister Resident of the United States in Japan.

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