New Zealand Journal of Science, Volumen1

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J. Wilkie & Company, 1883

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Página 108 - When natural causes are liable to be set aside and neutralized by what is called volition, the word Science is out of place. If it is free to man to choose what he will do or not do, there is no adequate science of him. If there is a science of him, there is no free choice, and the praise or blame with which we regard one another are impertinent and out of place.
Página 134 - Although much remains obscure, and will long remain obscure, I can entertain no doubt, after the most deliberate study and dispassionate judgment of which I am capable, that the view which most naturalists until recently entertained, and which I formerly entertained — namely, that each species has been independently created — is erroneous.
Página 93 - At first sight the lower curve might be thought the more useful of the two, as it includes the effect of the step, but a little consideration will show that this is not the case. For most cases in which worms are used the efficiency of the transmission, as such, is of very little account.
Página 135 - Although I am fully convinced of the truth of the views given in this volume . . . , I by no means expect to convince experienced naturalists whose minds are stocked with a multitude of facts all viewed, during a long course of years from a point of view directly opposite to mine.
Página 555 - ... the study of nature. The circle of knowledge comprehends both, and we should all have some notion, at any rate, of the whole circle of knowledge. The rejection of the humanities by the realists, the rejection of the study of nature by the humanists, are alike ignorant. He whose aptitudes carry him to the study of nature should have some notion of the humanities; he whose aptitudes carry him to the humanities should have some notion of the phenomena and laws of nature.
Página 555 - ... has. This one's special aptitudes are for knowing men, — the study of the humanities ; that one's special aptitudes are for knowing the world — the study of nature. The circle of knowledge comprehends both, and we should all have some notion, at any rate, of the whole circle of knowledge.
Página 555 - The mother tongue, the elements of Latin and of the chief modern languages, the elements of history, of arithmetic and geometry, of geography, and of the knowledge of nature, should be the studies of the lower classes in all secondary schools, and should be the same for all boys at this stage.
Página 68 - Why didn't somebody teach me the constellations, too, and make me at home in the starry heavens which are always overhead, and which I don't half know to this day?
Página 135 - It is so easy to hide our ignorance under such expressions as the " plan of creation," " unity of design," &c., and to think that we give an explanation when we only re-state a fact. Any one whose disposition leads him to attach more weight to unexplained difficulties than to the explanation of a certain number of facts will certainly reject the theory.
Página 555 - ... so averse are they to cram ; so clearly do they perceive that what forms a youth, and what he should in all ways be induced to acquire, is the orderly development of his faculties under good and trained teaching.

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