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SCHEDULE I-Cotton and Manufactures of

SCHEDULE J-Flax, Hemp, and Jute, and Manufactures of

SCHEDULE K-Wool and Manufactures of

SCHEDULE L-Silk and Silk Goods

SCHEDULE M-Papers and Books

INDEXED

WASHINGTON
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

1921

åd at

44-20648

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JOSEPH W. FORDNEY, Michigan, Chairman.

WILLIAM R. GREEN, Iowa.
NICHOLAS LONGWORTH, Ohio.
WILLIS C. HAWLEY, Oregon.
ALLEN T. TREADWAY, Massachusetts.
IRA C. COPLEY, Illinois.

LUTHER W. MOTT, New York.
GEORGE M. YOUNG, North Dakota.
JAMES A. FREAR, Wisconsin.
JOHN Q. TILSON, Connecticut.
ISAAC BACHARACH, New Jersey.
LINDLEY H. HADLEY, Washington.
CHARLES B. TIMBERLAKE, Colorado.
GEORGE M. BOWERS, West Virginia.
HENRY W. WATSON, Pennsylvania.

II

CLAUDE KITCHIN, North Carolina.
HENRY T. RAINEY, Illinois.
CORDELL HULL, Tennessee.
JOHN N. GARNER, Texas.
JAMES W. COLLIER, Mississippi.
CLEMENT C. DICKINSON, Missouri.
WILLIAM A. OLDFIELD, Arkansas.
CHARLES R. CRISP, Georgia.
JOHN F. CAREW, New York.
WHITMELL P. MARTIN, Louisiana.

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SCHEDULE I.

COTTON AND MANUFACTURES OF.

COMMITTEE ON WAYS AND MEANS,
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,
Wednesday, January 26, 1921.

The committee was called to order by the chairman (Hon. Joseph
W. Fordney) at 10 o'clock a. m.

COTTON CLOTHS AND YARNS.

[Paragraphs 250 and 252.]

A. H. LOWE, REPRESENTING THE CONSOLIDATED TARIFF COMMITTEE
OF COTTON MANUFACTURERS, FITCHBURG, MASS.

Mr. LowE. We have prepared a consolidated brief, and I have been selected to represent the general cotton-manufacturing industry. This industry is one of the three great essential industries-feeding, housing, and clothing the people.

The committee, of which I am the general chairman, is made up of representative members of the National Council of American Cotton Manufacturers; the American Association of Cotton Manufacturers, having an office at Charlotte, N. C.; the National Association of Cotton Manufacturers, having an office in Boston, Mass.; the Association of Cotton Textile Merchants, having an office in New York City; and the Arkwright Club, having an office in Boston, Mass., representing fully 1,000 mills, including finishing plants, print works, and bleachers, North and South.

These organizations and mills are represented by a consolidated committee of 32 gentlemen.

The industry represented by this committee is one of the great manufacturing enterprises of the Nation and has an investment estimated at approximately $2,000,000,000. About $750,000,000 of this is in the cotton-growing States and $1,250,000,000 in the noncotton-growing States.

It is estimated that 180,000 cotton-mill operatives are employed in the mills in the cotton-growing States and 250,000 in the mills in the noncotton-growing States, a total of 430,000 employees, with probably a million and a half people directly dependent upon wages paid by our cotton mills.

About 6,420,000 bales of cotton were consumed in this country in 1920. Of this amount, about 3,500,000 bales, or 56 per cent, were consumed in the cotton-growing States and 2,920,000 bales, or 44 per cent, were consumed in the noncotton-growing States.

These figures are given to show to some extent the importance of the industry. Upon its successful operation rests the demand for and prices of cotton, one of the great staple products of the soil.

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