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Sacred Lute

:

A COLLECTION OF SACRED MUSIC;
DESIGNED FOR THE USE OF CONGREGATIONS GENERALLY,

CONSISTING OF NEW TUNES, ANTHEMS, AND CHANTS

FOR PUBLIC AND PRIVATE WORSHIP.

TO WHICH IS ADDED AN ELEMENTARY DEPARTMENT INCLUDING A VARIETY OF LIGHT GLEES, CHORUSES, &c., &o.,

FOR

THE SOCIAL CIRCLE, CONCERTS, AND MUSICAL CONVENTIONS,

BY T. E. PERKINS,
NEW OLIVE BRANCH," "ORIENTAL GLEE AND TNTHEM BOOK," "SHINING STAR,” “BOOK OF SABBATH ANTHEMA."

AUTHOR OF THE

NEW YORK:

F. J. HUNTINGTON, BROOME ST.
CINCINNATI AND CHICAGO: POE & HITCHCOCK.

PHILADELPHIA:
J. B. LIPPINCOTT & CO.-PERKINPINE & HIGGINS,

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2107 PREFA C E.:+47

sa THE SACRED LUTE is intended for the use of “Christian Congregations generally," and the author has laboured with industrious care to meet the requirements of the multitudes thus designated.

In the matter of selections from American composers, he has not rested content with the fruits of sturdy begging, still less with the meagre concessions of courtesy. The works of Dr. Mason, Mr. Bradbury, and the late Mr. Woodbury have been ransacked for everything which could enrich its pages, or lend interest and variety;* while a like care has been bestowed in selections from the standard authors of olden time; yet the magnitude of the work leaves space for an amount of original music, amply sufficient, it is believed to meet the hunger for what is new.

The work contains all the metres of the Methodist Hymn Book, and therefore the metres of all hymn books in use, To meet the wants as well as furnish tunes for the metres of the M. E. Church, the author has had the able assistance of Mr. SYLVESTER Main, so widely and favourably known as Mr. Woodbury's assistant in the compilation of the “New Lute of Zion," and subsequently as one of the compilers of the " Methodist Hymn and Tune Book," and whom the agents of the book room, Messrs. Carlton and Porter, in the preface to that work, justly commend as “one of our most experienced and popular choristers, selected in view of his known interest in the objects of the work, his attainments in the science of music, and his acquaintance with our denominational tastes."--The Lute is divided as follows: Part 1.-SINGING-SCHOOL DEPARTMENT.

Part 4.-CHANTS. Consisting of 74 pages, comprising The Nulation Department, mostly contributed

Among which will be found all those which are coneidered standard and useful. by Dr. Mason ; Progressive Singing School Exercises, written by the author, after the : popular plan adopted in the New Olive Branch; and a very large miscellaneous

Part 5.---PRAYER-MEETING DEPARTMENT. selection of Glees, &c., for the Social Circle and Concerl-Room, which contains a variety of pieces suitable for Fourth of July celebrations, Literary Anniversaries, School Con This is a collection of the choicest melodies, old and new, for Social Prayer, the ventions, Temperance Meetings, &c., and a choice selection of Patriotic Songs. Love-feast, and Class Meeting ; and for especial use in times of revival. The design is Pirt 2.-CONTAINS THE MÉTRICAL CIIURCII MUSIC.

to furnish a variety of melodies which may be sung by 'all-easy of execution yet not

light, words and music that will touch the heart as well as the ear. Many of the old Short, Common, Long, and Particular. These last are numbered and arranged

melodies are written out and harmonized for the first time. in regular order, as in the Methodist Hymn Book, from 1st to 40th ; 80 that all metres of the same kind will be found together. This part of the work comprises upward of

PART 6.-OLD FOLKS' DEPARTMENT. 600 tunes, including all the metres in the Methodist Ilymn Book and those of other denominations, in every key, and every variety of measure.

This contains all the old familiar tunes sung by our fathers in days gone by ; Part 3.-ANTHEMS AND SET PIECES.

melodies which stir the heart, and with which many a pleasant association is interThis department is unusually large, containing 101 pages, comprising most of the

woven, forming a chain of many links, uniting ig sweetest harmony the past and the

present. old favourites, with a large number of new pieces, composed expressly for this work.

To the Notation Department, mostly the contribution of Dr. Mason, who for such a service is without an equal, are added directions for voice training and culture, followed by cheerful, merry glees, and songs for Musical Conventions, and the Social Circle, in which it is thought teachers will find much to lighten their duties, and pupils equal relief from the tedium of the school-room, while they are' in no wise inconsistent with the succeeding and sacred portions of the work designed exclusively for chóirs and the sanctuary.

* These gentlemen and the Estate of Mr. Woodbury are in fact parties to, and interested in, the copy-night of the SACRED LUTI.

Entered according to act of Congress, A, D. 1864, by F. J. HUNTINGTOX, in the Clerk's office of the District Court for the Southern District of New York

UENRY BEYER, litereotyper sud Blectroty por, 638 Broadway, Now York,

C. A. ALVORD
Pruuter, 15 Vandewater St., New York,

folio

the

2127

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INTRODUCTION.

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M

M USICAL Ν Ο Τ Α Τ Ι Ο Ν: BEING A BRIEF EXPLANATION OF THE CHARACTERS OR SIGNS USED IN WRITTEN MUSIC. •P47 S2

CHAPTER I. .1864

VIII. Measures and Parts of Measurer may be indicated to the ear by count. ing, and to the eye by motions of the hand, called Beats. Thus we are said to

count or to beat the time.
\ I. There are three departments in the elements of music, each of which has
its respective characters or signs.

$ IX. There are four kinds of measure in common use:

1. A measure having two parts, accented on the first, is called 1. Rhythmics, troating of the length of Tones

DOUBLE MEASURE. It may be indicated by counting one, two; 2. Melodics, treating of the pitch of Tones.

or by a downward beat, and an upwardl beat. Taking quarter notes 3. Dynamics, treating of the power of Tones.

as a standard (which are most convenient to begin with), it may

be thus represented :
CHAPTER II.

RHYTHMICS.
II. The relative length and duration of tones is represented by characters

2. A measure having three parts, accented on the first, is called called Nores.

Triple MEASURE. It may be indicated by counting one, two, ♡ III. The following notes are in common use; their names indicate their

three; or by a downward beat, an inward beat tto the left), and representative length.

an upward beat. It may be thus represented : Whole. Half. Quarter. Eighth. Sixteenth.

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OF NOTES.

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Note. The same characters are also used for a Melodic purpose. See § 23.
IV. Characters, corresponding to the notes, are used to indicate silence,
called Rests.
Whole. Half. Quarter. Eighth. Sixteenth.


V. A dot (.), immediately following a note or rest, adds one half to its
representative length.

PO VI. A figure three (3) placed over or under any three equal notes, reduces the
length represented by them to that of two of the same kind without the figure,
Tones thus represented, and notes thus written are called TRIPLETS.

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4. A measure having six parts, accented principally on the first, and

lightly on the fourth part, is called SextUPLE MEASURE. It may be indicated by counting one, two, three, four, five, six; or by two downwara beats in the first the hand falling half way), an inward beat, an outward beat, and two upward beats. li may be thus represented :

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MELODICS,

KUSICAL NOTATION.
4

8 XI. The end of a section or period, or the final close of a piece of music, or 8 XX. Each line and each space of the staff is called A DEGREE; thus the staff
the end of a line in poetry, is often indicated (as at the close of the foregoing contains nine degrees, there being five lines and four spaces.
examples) by a Double BAR.

9 XXI. When more degrees than pine are needed, lines and spaces above and

below the staff are used, called LINES ABOVE, or SPACES ABOVE, or LINES BELOW,
Nork.-The rules for accent, as here given, are liable to many exceptions.

or SPACES BELOW.
XII. In the foregoing examples a quarter note has always been used on each

Note:—These added lines are often called Leger Linss.
part of a measure, but any other note may be thus used, producing VARIETIES

$ XXII. Any degree of the staff may be taken to indicate the tone one ; but
or MEASURE.

when this is determined the others must follow in regular order.
• XIII. Figures written in the representation of fractions are often placed at

0 XXIII. The melodic succession of tones is indicated by notes written upon
the commencement of a piece of music to designate both the kind and the variety the staff

.
of measure. The numerator referring to the kind of measure, and the denomi.

Note.—The same characters (notes) are primarily used to indicate the length of
nator to the variety of measure.

tones. See & III.
Examples of some of the common Varieties of Measure, marked by Figures.

CHAPTER V.
Double Measure. Triple Measure. Quadruple Measure.

Sextuple Measure,

ABSOLUTE PITCH, SCALE PITCH, AND CLEFA.
3

6 XXIX. That pitch which is independent of scale relationship is ABSOLUTE
Pitch. It is designated by letters, and is named from their names, as A, B, C

D, E, F, G.
PPP P

Ć Ć D B ♡ XXV. The primitive or MODEL scale * (by which is meant the first in the

universally received order of classification) is based upon C, or C is taken as one;
E e

and the order of the tones is as follows:

C is one, D is two, E is three, F is four, G is five, A is six, B is seven, and C is

eight.
CHAPTER IV.

0 XXVI. Letters are used to show the pitch of the scale, and its position as
written upon the staff, and when thus used they are called CLEF-LETTERS, or

CLEFs.
XIV. Tonos, considered with respect to relative pitch, are disposed in a

; XXVII. There are two clefs in common use, G or
certain series, called The SCALE, or Ths DIATONIC SCALE.
$ XV. The scale consists of a regular succession of eight tones. These are

0 XXVIII. The G clef is placed upon the second line; it is used for Treblo
named from the names of numbers; ONE, TWO, THREE, FOUR, FIVE, ȘIX, SEVEN,

and Alto, and frequently for Tenor voices. The F clef is placed upon the fourth

line; it is used for Bass, and (when the two parts are written on the same staff)
À XVI. The difference of pitch between any two tones is called an INTERVAL.

for Tenor voices.
0 XVII. There are two kinds of intervals, larger and smaller, in the regularly

Erample.

THE SCALE IN BOTH CLEFS.
progressive scale, called Steps and Half-steps; thus the intervals between
ihree and four, and seven and eight, are half-steps, all the others are steps.

8 XVIII. In elementary singing exercises the following syllables are used in
connection with the tones of the scale:
Nanies of Tones,
One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven, Eight.

A B C D E F G A B C D E F
Syllables as Written, Do, RE, Mi,

MELODICS.

THE SCALI..

and F or

LIGHT.

G

G

SOL, La, Si, Do.
Syllables as Pronounced, Doe, Ray, Mee, Fah, Sol, Lah, See, Doe.

9:
$ XIX. The relative pitch of tones is indicated to the eye by a character con-
sisting of five parallel, horizontal lines, together with their intermediate spaces,
eallod TAL STATT.

*Sometimes called the Normal Scale, and also the Typio Scale.

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MUSICAL NOTATION.

5 CHAPTER VI.

CHAPTER VIII.
MELODICS. CHROMATIC SCALE

MELODICA. TRANSPOSITION OF THE SCALE XXIX. There is another scale formed by intermediate tones between those 0 XXXVII. Thus far the pitch C has been taken as one, or as the basis of the tones of the Diatonic scale which are separated by the interval of a step. It scale; but this may be changed, and any other pitch may be taken as one. Such consists of thirteen tones, and twelve intervals of a half-step each ; this is called a change of pitch is called The Transposition or the ŠCALE. the CHROMATIC SCALE.

Q XXXVIII. When any pitch is taken as one, the scale is said to be in tho $XXX. The intermediate tones are named from either of the tones of the Key of that pitch; thus if he one, the scale is said to be in the key of C; if G Diatonic scale, between which they occur, with the addition of the word sharp, be one, the scale is said to be in the key of G, etc. bignifying higher, or the word Aat, signifying lower, prefixed or surfixed. Thus XXXIX. Each key is noted at the commencement of the staff, immediately the intermediate tone between one and two is named with respect to relative

after the clef, by an indication of its component tones. Such an indication of pitch SHARP Onc, or Flat Two, and with respect to absolute pitch, C-SHARP, or the key is called The SIGNATURE. D-FLAT.

♡ XL As the Model Key (C) embraces none of the intermediate tonos (tonos $XXXI. Characters are used as signs of interinediate tones, i. e., of the tones named sharp, or flat), so tho absence of the characters by which they are indi. Launed sharp or fat, called Sharps and Flats.

cated (sharps or flats) serves as its Signature. XXXII. An intermediate tone is indicated by the same degree of the staff

0 XLI. Tho Signature of all other keys consists of such sharps or flats as as is the Diatonic scale-tone from which it is named; but with the eharacter indicate the intermediate tones (tones named sharp or fiat) necossary to constituto or 2) affixed to that degree.

the key represented. XXXIII. Sharps und Flats (signs) continue their significanoe troughout the

0 XLII. Tabular view of the order of the succession of koys in transposition,

with the signatures: measure in which they occur, and also from measure to measure, when the same tono is repeated, or unless canceled by an intermediate noto upon some other de

1. By Fifths. gree of the staff. They are also canceled by a sign, called a Natural. (1)

Key of G. Signature ono sharp, or F#.
D.

two sharps, or F# and C.

A.
CHAPTER VII.

three sharps, or FH, C# and G#
E.

four sharps, or FH, CHG. and Doctor MELODICS. MINOR SCALE.

2. By Fourths. \XXXIV. There is another Diatonic scale, consisting also of eight tones, but

Koy of F. Signature one flat, or Bh. arranged according to a different order of intervals from that which has already

B.

two flats, or B7 and E. been explained, called The MINOR SCALE.

three flats, or Ry, E, and Ah. Ar.

four flats, or By, En, Ay and Diz XXXV. The Minor scale is used in various forms. The following are tho

Nore. It is not supposed necossary to extend this tabular view beyond the present

limits.
XXXVI. 1. The Natural Minor Scale; consisting of the following series

CII A PTER IX.
A, B, C, D, E, F, G, A.
2 The HARMONIC MINOR SCALE, (called also regular), as follows:
A, B, C, D, E, F, G, A.

( XLIII. Thero are fivo principal degrees of Force, as follows:
3. The MELODIC Minor Scale (irregular), as follows:

1. Very soft,

PIANISSIMO,

abbreviated
2. Soft,
Puno,

P.
A, B, C, D, E, F, G, A.

3. Medium,

Mezzo,
In connection with this forni in the ascending scries, the Natural Minor Scale

4. Loud,

FORTE, is genorally used in tho descending series.

f. 5. Very loud,

FORTI&SIMO,

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DYNAMICS

YORCE OF TOXES.

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